• Politics
    HuffPost

    Rush Limbaugh Claims The 'Common Cold' Coronavirus Is An Effort To ‘Get Trump’

    The conservative radio host declared communists and the media have "weaponized" the "common cold."

  • Health
    The Week

    Harvard scientist predicts coronavirus will infect up to 70 percent of humanity

    Harvard University epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch is predicting the coronavirus "will ultimately not be containable" and, within a year, will infect somewhere between 40 and 70 percent of humanity, The Atlantic reports. But don't be too alarmed. Many of those people, Lipsitch clarifies, won't have severe illnesses or even show symptoms at all, which is already the case for many people who have tested positive for the virus.That's precisely why he doesn't think the virus can be stopped. Viruses like SARS, MERS, and the avian flu were eventually contained in part because they were more intense and had a higher fatality rate. In other words, if you were infected by the virus that caused SARS, chances were you weren't out and about. But because the current coronavirus, known as COVID-19, can be asymptomatic, or at least very mild, there's a better chance people will likely go about their day as normal. The down side, though, is that it becomes harder to trace and prevent. In that sense it's similar to the flu, which can also be deadly, but often passes without the infected person seeking medical care.The Atlantic reports Lipsitch is definitely not alone in his prediction. There's an emerging consensus that the outbreak will eventually morph into a new seasonal disease, which, per The Atlantic, could one day turn "cold and flu season" into "cold and flu and COVID-19 season." Read more at The Atlantic.More stories from theweek.com The coronavirus recession? The real third way in 2020 Top member of Trump's coronavirus task force asks Twitter for help accessing map of virus

  • Business
    MarketWatch

    Suze Orman says investors should ‘rejoice’ at the Dow’s more-than-1,000-point tumble — here’s why

    Author and personal-finance expert Suze Orman had a simple two-word answer to the question of how to react to a market that just shed more than 1,000 points on the back of growing uncertainties, including the spread of the coronavirus outbreak. Orman said Monday on CNBC that investors should stay the course and explained why she thought investors worried about their retirement savings after a historic downturn for the Dow Jones Industrial Average should welcome such selloffs.

  • U.S.
    Dr. Phil CBS

    Parents Say 14-Year-Old Son Is ‘Addicted’ To Video Games, Terrorizes House To Get What He Wants

    Parents say their 14-year-old son is “addicted” to video games, plays up to 17 hours a day, and runs their household by “bullying” and “terrorizing” them. See some of his outbursts.

  • Politics
    The Fiscal Times

    Sanders Bristles When Asked on ’60 Minutes’ About the Cost of His Proposals

    In an interview with “60 Minutes,” Sen. Bernie Sanders didn’t want to get into any details when pressed about the price tag for his ambitious agenda. He said his Medicare-for-All plan would cost about $30 trillion over 10 years, which would, he argues, cost “substantially less than letting the current system go.” Asked about a total price tag for his entire agenda — which includes free public college, cancellation of all student debt and a Green New Deal to tackle climate change — Sanders said he doesn’t have a total cost figure:Anderson Cooper: But you say you don't know what the total price is, but you know how it's gonna be paid for. How do you know it's gonna be paid for if you don't know how much the price is?Bernie Sanders: Well, I can't-- you know, I can't rattle off to you ever nickel and every dime. But we have accounted for-- you-- you talked about Medicare for All. We have options out there that will pay for it.Later, after Cooper asked Sanders about how he’ll pay for a new universal childcare and pre-K proposal, the Democratic frontrunner pushed back on the premise of the question:“It's taxes on billionaires. You know? You know, I get a little bit tired of hearing my opponents saying—‘Gee, how you going to pay for a program that impacts and helps children or working-class families or middle-class families? How you going to pay for that?’ And yet, where are people saying, ‘How are you going to pay for over $750 billion on military spending?’ How you going to pay for a trillion dollars in tax breaks to the 1% in large corporations, which was what Trump did? When you help the billionaires and you help Wall Street, ‘Hey! Of course we can pay for it. That's what America's supposed to be about.’ Well, I disagree.”Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.