• Style
    Footwear News

    Hailey Baldwin Accents a Little Black Bikini With Her Go-To Nike Kicks

    Sneakers and bathing suits are Baldwin's new favorite outfit combo.

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  • Politics
    Refinery29

    This Is Amy Coney Barrett, The Potential RBG Replacement Who Hates Your Uterus

    With a vacant seat in the U.S. Supreme Court following the Friday passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, President Donald Trump says he is determined to fill her spot, vowing to nominate a new judge as early as this Friday or Saturday. “I will be putting forth a nominee next week. It will be a woman,” Trump said during a Sept. 19 rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina, just one day after Ginsburg died and her family stated that she hoped “not be replaced until a new president is installed.”While rumored nominees include Barbara Lagoa of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, and fellow appeals court judge Allison Jones Rushing, there is one woman who appears to be the frontrunner to flip RBG’s seat: Judge Amy Coney Barrett. And with her name making the top of nearly every speculative list, many are now wondering who Barrett is and what she really stands for. Amy Coney Barrett currently serves the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, a position she was appointed to by Trump in 2017. A Notre Dame Law School graduate, she began her career in 1998 as a clerk for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Under his tutelage, Barrett honed conservative beliefs, including standing against abortion, and has been described as Scalia’s “ideological heir.” According to those who have studied her career more closely, like Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List anti-abortion political group, Barrett is “a woman who brings the argument to the court that is potentially the contrary to the views of the sitting women justices.” And by all accounts, this appears to be true, and Barrett plans to continue Scalia’s anti-abortion legacy.During her 2017 confirmation hearing, she made clear that in her new role as judge, she would follow the Supreme Court’s lead in looking to restrict and ban abortion. This is particularly important, considering that in 2018, she was also under consideration to fill the Supreme Court seat that is now occupied by Brett Kavanaugh.The following year, she joined a dissenting opinion in an appeals court case of Planned Parenthood Of Indiana And Kentucky vs. Indiana Health Commissioner, which determined an Indiana law banning patients from having abortions if their fetuses had disabilities — including life-threatening ones.But Barrett’s positions on abortion stem from her personal background and strong religious beliefs. In 2002, she joined her Catholic university’s faculty. At the time, fellow educators actively opposed ideas of secularization, and especially the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.“Life begins at conception,” she told Notre Dame Magazine, who also described Barrett’s view on Roe v. Wade as “creating through judicial fiat a framework of abortion on demand.”  For her part, Barrett is a practicing Roman Catholic and mother of seven. She is well-known throughout conservative circles for putting her religious convictions at the forefront of her work and identity. “Her religious convictions are pro-life, and she lives those convictions,” said U.S. district Judge Patrick J. Schiltz, one of her mentors.“I think the question of whether people can get very late-term abortions, you know, how many restrictions can be put on clinics, I think that would change,” Barrett said during a talk she gave on Roe v. Wade at Jacksonville University in 2016.Barrett’s nomination could stand to change everything for the Supreme Court. On Nov. 10, when the Supreme Court is back in session, they will once again hear arguments challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. With Barrett in the seat, women’s access to reproductive health could be in serious jeopardy. If Trump does nominate Barrett — a noted anti-abortionist — it would solidify fears for millions of Democrats: a 6-3 conservative majority in the Supreme Court that will most definitely derail years of inclusive healthcare initiatives. And, considering Ginsburg’s tenure protecting women’s rights and elevating social justice initiatives, Trump would actively be opposing her legacy by appointing Barrett, putting millions of vulnerable people at risk.“Amy Coney Barrett meets Donald Trump’s two main litmus tests,” Nan Aron, the president of Alliance for Justice, told the New York Times. “She has made clear she would invalidate the ACA and take health care away from millions of people and undermine a woman’s reproductive freedom.” Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?In The Wake Of RBG's Death, What Happens Next?Mitch McConnell Wasted No Time Being Human GarbageYou Owe Ruth Bader Ginsburg More Than You Know

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  • Health
    Best Life

    Dr. Fauci Says These 3 Places Must Close to Avoid More COVID Surges

    Throughout the COVID pandemic, it's become increasingly clear that certain types of businesses in particular can pose a serious COVID risk: those that are indoors with poor ventilation where people tend to gather close together. And while most states have now reopened the majority of businesses, Anthony Fauci, MD, the nation's leading immunologist, is warning that three specific businesses should stay closed amid COVID.During an appearance on MSNBC's All In on Sept. 17, host Chris Hayes pointed out that Arizona, Texas, and New York benefitted from closing certain establishments. And Fauci said, "I totally agree" with that tactic."In fact, the CDC just came out—if you go on their website—with a figure that's really telling. It shows the odds of risk of different types of situations that give you a higher risk of transmissibility," he explained. The CDC study Fauci was referencing examined COVID cases across 11 U.S. health care facilities and looked at the ratio of patients who received negative versus positive COVID test results and where they'd been in the past two weeks. Read on to find out the three businesses that create the most COVID risk, according to the CDC and Fauci. And for more risky behavior to avoid, check out 24 Things You're Doing Every Day That Put You at COVID Risk. 1 GymsFauci pointed out that one of the three riskiest places to go are gyms, where people tend to breathe heavily, expelling more potentially contaminated droplets, and where there isn't outdoor air filtering in.Among the patients studied by the CDC, 7.8 percent of people who tested positive had been to the gym in the past two weeks, while just 6.3 percent of those who tested negative had. And for more on COVID and gyms, check out This Is The Absolute Worst Place to Go in Your Gym During Coronavirus. 2 Bars"You've gotta look very carefully at things like bars, [which] are a really important place of spreading of infection. There's no doubt about that," Fauci told Hayes. "And that becomes particularly important if you happen to be in an area where there's a high degree of community spread."In the CDC study, 8.5 percent of people whose tests came back positive had been to a bar in the two weeks prior, compared to 5 percent of patients with negative test results. 3 RestaurantsThe CDC found that the biggest disparity between where positive COVID patients had gone versus negative COVID patients was restaurants: 40.9 percent of patients with COVID had dined out two weeks prior compared to just 27.7 percent of those who tested negative."When you have restaurants indoors in a situation where you have a high degree of infection in the community, you're not wearing masks, that's a problem," Fauci said. "So those are things that are crystal clear." And for more COVID updates, sign up for our daily newsletter. 4 Religious gatheringsWhile Fauci didn't call these out himself, the CDC report he referenced noted a marked different between the percent of people with positive COVID tests that had gone to church or another religious gathering (7.8 percent) and the percent of people with negative COVID tests that had (5 percent). And for more on this study, check out These Are the 4 Places People Went Before They Got COVID, Study Says.

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