CIA

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is a civilian foreign intelligence service of the federal government of the United States, tasked with gathering, processing, and analyzing national security information from around the world, primarily through the use of human intelligence (HUMINT).
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  • Who Is to Blame for America’s Disturbing Iran Policy?
    National Review

    Who Is to Blame for America’s Disturbing Iran Policy?

    Difficulties with Iran will recur regularly, like the oscillations of a sine wave, and the recent crisis — if such it was, or is — illustrates persistent U.S. intellectual and institutional failures, starting with this: The Trump administration's assumption, and that of many in Congress, is that if the president wants to wage war against a nation almost the size of Mexico (and almost four times larger than Iraq) and with 83 million people (more than double that of Iraq), there is no constitutional hindrance to him acting unilaterally.In April, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was pressed in a Senate hearing to pledge that the administration would not regard the 2001 authorization for the use of military force against al-Qaeda and other non-state actors responsible for 9/11 as authorization, 18 years later, for war against Iran. Pompeo laconically said he would "prefer to just leave that to lawyers." Many conservatives who preen as "originalists" when construing all the Constitution's provisions other than the one pertaining to war powers are unimpressed by the Framers' intention that Congress should be involved in initiating military force in situations other than repelling sudden attacks.The Economist, which is measured in its judgments and sympathetic to America, tartly referred to the supposed evidence of Iran's intentions to attack U.S. forces, allies, or "interests" as "suspiciously unspecific." Such skepticism, foreign and domestic, reflects 16-year-old memories of certitudes about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction: Remember Secretary of State Colin Powell spending days at the CIA receiving assurances about the evidence. There also are concerns about the impetuosity of a commander in chief who vows that military conflict would mean "the official end" of Iran, whatever that means.U.S. policy makes easing economic sanctions against Iran contingent on Iran doing twelve things, most of which (e.g., halting development of ballistic missiles, withdrawing from Syria, ending support for allied groups) it almost certainly will not do. This U.S. policy is congruent with U.S. disregard of this truth: Any nation, however prostrate, poor, or ramshackle, that ardently wants nuclear weapons can acquire them. Just four years after Hiroshima, the Soviet Union, which had been laid to waste by World War II, became a nuclear power. China was an impoverished peasant society in 1964 when it detonated a nuclear weapon. Pakistan's per capita income was $470 in 1998 when it joined the nuclear club. In the more than a decade since North Korea acquired nuclear weapons, U.S. policy has pronounced this "unacceptable." But U.S. behavior has been to accept it while unfurling the tattered flag of arms control — hoping to talk North Korea into giving up what it has devoted three decades to developing.Fifteen years ago, Condoleezza Rice, then George W. Bush's national-security adviser, said that an abstraction (the "international community") would not "allow the Iranians to develop a nuclear weapon." Allow? In 2012, President Obama said: "Iran's leaders should understand that I do not have a policy of containment. I have a policy to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon." If — probably when — that policy fails, we shall have a policy of containment, or a major war.Trump's national-security apparatus might include a plucky cohort of regime changers who, undaunted by 18 discouraging years (Afghanistan, Iraq), cling to the fatal conceit that U.S. policies, such as sanctions, can manipulate the internal dynamics of societies such as Iran's. In any case, today's president is, in one respect, like his predecessor: Obama denied that hundreds of U.S. air strikes that killed hundreds in Libya and helped to destroy a regime constituted involvement in "hostilities."Trump recently vetoed a congressional resolution that would have terminated U.S. involvement with Saudi Arabia and its allies in the war in Yemen, by the terms of the 1973 War Powers Resolution. It forbids the "introduction" of U.S. forces into "hostilities" for more than 90 days without congressional authorization. It defines "introduction" to include the assignment of U.S. military "to command, coordinate, participate in the movement of, or accompany the . . . military forces of any foreign country or government when such military forces are engaged . . . in hostilities."VIEW SLIDESHOW: USS Abraham LincolnThe U.S. military is providing intelligence, logistical support, and, for a time, occasional in-flight refueling of Saudi bombers. This certainly constitutes involvement in the commanding, coordinating, and movement of military forces. This is similarly certain: Whatever the U.S. does to Iran militarily will be decided unilaterally by this president. But his predecessor, and today's Congress and previous Congresses, will be implicated in the absence of restraint by laws or norms.© 2019, Washington Post Writers Group

  • Trump enlists Barr on 'new front' in attack on intelligence agencies
    BostonGlobe.com

    Trump enlists Barr on 'new front' in attack on intelligence agencies

    WASHINGTON — President Trump tried somewhat clumsily last year to revoke the security clearance of the former CIA director who played a role in opening the Russia investigation. He then wanted to release classified documents to prove he was the target of a “witch hunt.” Both attempts petered out, hampered by aides who slow-rolled the president and Justice Department officials who fought Trump, warning that he was jeopardizing national security. But this past week, Attorney General William Barr engineered a new approach. At Barr's urging, Trump granted him new authorities to examine the start of the Russia investigation, showing a new level of sophistication for an old line of attack. Unlike Trump's

  • Trump admin bypassing Congress with $7 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates
    wbal.com

    Trump admin bypassing Congress with $7 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates

    (WASHINGTON) -- The Trump administration on Friday said it would sell $7 billion-worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates with getting congressional approval, citing Iran as an urgent threat.  The move has sparked bipartisan outrage on Capitol Hill, where lawmakers are promising to block the sales and calling out Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for what they see as an illegal decision made in a shady manner. "The excuse that this is somehow an emergency is just flat out false, and they know it. But they're still going ahead and doing it, which is beyond the pale," said a congressional aide, speaking anonymously to discuss the details of these deals, which the State Department

  • Jewish Insider

    Israeli Independence Scene in DC | Garcetti clarifies Jerusalem embassy stance

     Tell your friends to sign up for the Daily Kickoff here or for early 7AM access via Debut Inbox ** Good Thursday Morning! Enjoying the Daily Kickoff? Please share us with your friends & tell them to sign up at [JI]. Have a tip? We'd love to hear from you. Anything from hard news and punditry to the lighter stuff, including event coverage, job transitions, or even special birthdays, is much appreciated. Email Editor@JewishInsider.com **

  • China accuses U.S. officials of misleading public on trade war
    Reuters

    China accuses U.S. officials of misleading public on trade war

    China on Friday accused U.S. officials of lying to the public about their trade war, as rising tensions between the world's two largest economies kept financial markets in a state of unease. Talks to end the trade dispute collapsed earlier this month, with the two sides in a stalemate over U.S. demands that China change its policies to address a number of key U.S. grievances, including theft of intellectual property and subsidies for state enterprises. Washington has slapped higher tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to retaliate, and effectively banned U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, the world's largest telecom network gear maker.

  • Associated Press

    Maduro invites Huawei to set up 4G network in Venezuela

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is inviting China's Huawei to help set up a 4G network in Venezuela, prompting opposition leader Juan Guaidó to accuse him of having an "absolute disconnection with reality."

  • Reuters

    Reuters US Domestic News Summary

    U.S. President Donald Trump's campaign believes he can turn Republicans' biggest liability from last year's congressional elections - the debate about the future of healthcare in America - into a winning issue for his reelection. Harvey Weinstein, women who accused him of sexual misconduct, his former film studio's board members and the New York attorney general's office have reached a tentative $44 million deal to resolve lawsuits and compensate alleged victims of the Hollywood producer, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday, citing people it said were familiar with the matter. The deal, if finalized, would resolve a civil rights lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general's office last year that accuses Weinstein Co's executives and board of failing to protect employees from a hostile work environment and Weinstein's sexual misconduct, the Journal reported.

  • Week in Review: Russian influence in EU elections, Cannes exclusives & ageing in Europe
    France 24

    Week in Review: Russian influence in EU elections, Cannes exclusives & ageing in Europe

    ARTICLES Former Trump campaign guru Steve Bannon is making a surprise cameo in France's European election campaign, ostensibly to help populist ally Marine Le Pen win. But he's proving an inconvenient interloper and giving Emmanuel Macron's side a lifeline. Eight journalists have been summoned for questioning by France's domestic intelligence services, including five new summonses revealed Wednesday, prompting outcry from press freedom advocates. The journalists face questioning in connection with the so-called Benalla Affair and leaks of confidential reports on French weapons used in Yemen. Intergenerational living – when senior citizens and young people team up as roomates – offers solutions

  • Intelligence Director Dan Coats Puts Barr on Notice Not To Imperil National Security
    HuffPost

    Intelligence Director Dan Coats Puts Barr on Notice Not To Imperil National Security

    "Highly sensitive classified information ... if publicly released would put our national security at risk,” Coats said in a statement.

  • lite.cnn.com

    Breaking News, Latest News and Videos

    Washington (CNN) - The Trump administration has declared an emergency to bypass Congress and expedite billions of dollars in arms sales to various countries -- including Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates -- citing the need to deter what it called "the malign influence" of Iran throughout the Middle East. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo formally told lawmakers Friday of the administration's plans. "These sales will support our allies, enhance Middle East stability, and help these nations to deter and defend themselves from the Islamic Republic of Iran," Pompeo said in a statement that put the value of the sales at $8.1 billion. In a Friday letter to congressional lawmakers, Pompeo said

  • Pompeo to make up canceled Germany trip on Europe tour
    The Seattle Times

    Pompeo to make up canceled Germany trip on Europe tour

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo next week will make up a trip to Germany he canceled earlier this month amid heightened tensions with Iran. The State Department says Pompeo will meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin before heading to additional stops in Europe. Pompeo abruptly canceled a planned May 7 stop in Germany to make an unexpected visit to Iraq, shortly after the Trump administration announced it was sending an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf in response to threats from Iran. After meeting Merkel and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, the department said Pompeo would travel on to Switzerland and the Netherlands before joining President Donald Trump on his

  • Trump tells intelligence agencies to 'quickly and fully cooperate' with Attorney General Barr, escalating the investigation into the start of the Russia probe
    Business Insider

    Trump tells intelligence agencies to 'quickly and fully cooperate' with Attorney General Barr, escalating the investigation into the start of the Russia probe

    President Donald Trump directed the US intelligence community on Thursday to "quickly and fully cooperate" with Attorney General William Barr's investigation of the origins of the multi-year probe of whether his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia. The move marked an escalation in Trump's efforts to "investigate the investigators," as he continues to try to undermine the findings of special counsel Robert Mueller's probe amid mounting Democratic calls to bring impeachment proceedings against Trump. Press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement that Trump is delegating to Barr the "full and complete authority" to declassify documents relating to the probe, which would ease his efforts to review the sensitive intelligence underpinnings of the investigation.

  • TheStreet.com

    Huawei Fallout, Yield Curve Inverting, Plus Splunk's Earnings: Market Recon

    On Thursday morning, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo came off as sternly decisive. Pompeo claimed that Huawei -- the Chinese tech and telecom giant that the administration took a hard-line stance against last week as it became more apparent that China had balked on several already agreed points in the on again/off again trade (non) negotiations -- had been dishonest in the way that it portrays its relationship with the Communist Party in Beijing. What traders heard Pompeo say was, "get the heck out of China." And we did.

  • Reuters

    China accuses U.S. officials of misleading public on trade war

    China on Friday accused U.S. officials of lying to the public about their trade war, as rising tensions between the world's two largest economies kept financial markets in a state of unease. Talks to end the trade dispute collapsed earlier this month, with the two sides in a stalemate over U.S. demands that China change its policies to address a number of key U.S. grievances, including theft of intellectual property and subsidies for state enterprises. Washington has slapped higher tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to retaliate, and effectively banned U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, the world's largest telecom network gear maker.

  • Bypassing Congress, Trump Sells Weapons to Saudi Arabia, Orders Troops to Middle East
    Rolling Stone

    Bypassing Congress, Trump Sells Weapons to Saudi Arabia, Orders Troops to Middle East

    Democratic and Republican representatives criticized the move, and one prominent Democrat said the president may have violated the law