Kellyanne Conway

Kellyanne Elizabeth Conway (née Fitzpatrick; born January 20, 1967) is an American pollster, political consultant, and pundit who serves as counselor to the president in the administration of U.S. president Donald Trump. She was previously Trump's campaign manager, having been appointed in August 2016; Conway is the first woman to have run a successful U.S. presidential campaign.
News about Donald Trump's former campaign manager and senior adviser to his transition team.
  • Fentanyl presence growing as opioid deaths decline slightly
    WWLP Springfield

    Fentanyl presence growing as opioid deaths decline slightly

    While opioid overdose deaths in Massachusetts declined for the second year in a row, prevalence of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl has continued to climb to the point where it is now present in almost every death that's screened for drugs. The latest state overdose data, released Wednesday, showed fentanyl was present in 92 percent of opioid deaths where a toxicology screen occurred in the first quarter of 2019, up from 89 percent in 2018. “The real killer in this is the presence of fentanyl, which unfortunately is at an all-time high,” said Public Health Commissioner Dr. Monica Bharel. The new statistics landed Wednesday as White House officials highlighted their efforts to go after fentanyl traffickers.

  • Ivanka Trump, Kellyanne Conway, and other top Trump aides have had their White House offices relocated to remove potential asbestos
    Business Insider

    Ivanka Trump, Kellyanne Conway, and other top Trump aides have had their White House offices relocated to remove potential asbestos

    Part of the White House is undergoing construction to remove potentially dangerous materials and several top Trump advisers have been relocated.

  • Daily Mail

    Now George Conway calls his wife Kellyanne's boss a RAPIST

    Kellyanne Conway's husband George Conway has called President Donald Trump a 'rapist' in just the latest tweet to feature the widening political gulf between the power couple. George Conway, a prominent lawyer, jumped in Tuesday after Trump once again blasted his former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, who has been bashing Trump in TV appearances and on Monday said he is 'off his rocker.' On Tuesday morning, the Washington Examiner published a story where anonymous staffers leveled new accusations against Scaramucci which had not aired before the former loyalist started calling Trump unfit.   During Scaramucci's 11-day tenure, he told a female White House official he had

  • Kellyanne Conway's Curiously Relevant Family History
    Medium

    Kellyanne Conway's Curiously Relevant Family History

    Born with a surname like Fitzpatrick, it's clear Kellyanne has Irish ancestry, but not nearly as much as one might think. This particular branch of her family came to the United States many generations ago, back in the 1700s, so it contributed just a whisper of Irish heritage. It's almost a fluke that Conway wound up with a surname that represents so little of her background. Mankind has been migrating and mixing it up for millennia, so the breakdown of Conway's ancestry should be taken as approximations, rather than absolutes. But in addition to what Conway disclosed of her heritage, I unearthed research showing that she has a collection of lines adorned with Anglo-sounding surnames, and three

  • White House insists fundamentals of U.S. economy 'very strong'
    Las Vegas Sun

    White House insists fundamentals of U.S. economy 'very strong'

    WASHINGTON — The "fundamentals" of the U.S. economy are solid, the White House asserted, invoking an ill-fated political declaration of a decade ago amid mounting concern that a recession could imperil President Donald Trump's reelection. Exhibiting no such concern, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway declared to reporters on Monday, "The fact is, the fundamentals of our economy are very strong." It's a phrase with a history. Republican John McCain was accused of being out of touch when he made a similar declaration during the 2008 presidential campaign just hours before investment bank Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, setting off a stock market crash and global financial decline. A case can

  • The Kansas City Star

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. WITH EYES ON 2020, WHITE HOUSE INSISTS ECONOMY IS STRONG Despite record low unemployment and a growing economy, that growth is slowing and stock markets have swung wildly in recent weeks on fears of recession. 2. EMBATTLED HUAWEI CONFIDENT IN OWN TECHNOLOGY Founder Ren Zhengfei tells AP he doesn't want relief from U.S. sanctions if it requires China to make concessions in a tariff war. 3. 'PROTESTERS VS. POLICE': DIE-HARDS IN HONG KONG DEFEND STANCE Demonstrators explain how largely peaceful marches against proposed changes to the city's extradition law morphed into a summer of tear gas

  • Kellyanne Conway 'to lay low until the rule of law dies down': Americans often fooled by satire, researchers find
    OregonLive.com

    Kellyanne Conway 'to lay low until the rule of law dies down': Americans often fooled by satire, researchers find

    A lot of people who decry “fake news” are simply mad about news they don't like. But actual fake news -- that is, false or deliberately misleading information masquerading as news -- really can be a problem. And it turns out this even includes satire. Ohio State University communications professors Kelly Garrett and Robert Bond, along with OSU Ph.D. student Shannon Poulsen, spent months studying how people respond to satirical news -- and they found “it's pretty easy to mistake a satirical message for a literal one.” This isn't all that surprising. Many satirical news articles are subtle and play with strongly held views -- and they often quickly skitter past our eyeballs via social media --

  • AP News in Brief at 6:09 a.m. EDT
    The Kansas City Star

    AP News in Brief at 6:09 a.m. EDT

    AP News in Brief at 6:09 a.m. EDT White House insists 'fundamentals' of US economy are strong WASHINGTON (AP) — The "fundamentals" of the U.S. economy are solid, the White House asserted, invoking an ill-fated political declaration of a decade ago amid mounting concern that a recession could imperil President Donald Trump's reelection. Exhibiting no such concern, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway declared to reporters on Monday, "The fact is, the fundamentals of our economy are very strong." It's a phrase with a history. Republican John McCain was accused of being out of touch when he made a similar declaration during the 2008 presidential campaign just hours before investment bank Lehman Brothers

  • White House Insists 'Fundamentals' of Economy Are Strong
    NBC New York

    White House Insists 'Fundamentals' of Economy Are Strong

    The "fundamentals" of the U.S. economy are solid, the White House asserted Monday, invoking an ill-fated political declaration of a decade ago amid mounting concern that a recession could imperil President Donald Trump's reelection. Exhibiting no such concern, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway declared to reporters, "The fact is, the fundamentals of our economy are very strong," It's a phrase with a history. Republican John McCain was accused of being out of touch when he made a similar declaration during the 2008 presidential campaign just hours before investment bank Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, setting off a stock market crash and global financial decline. A case can be made for the