• NASA's "Spinoff" is the Coolest Magazine You've Never Read
    Science
    The Drive

    NASA's "Spinoff" is the Coolest Magazine You've Never Read

    Since it was founded in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s goals have been civilian. The agency’s main objective, to explore outside our orbit, was part of a larger mission to provide "the most effective utilization of the scientific and engineering resources of the United States." Consider that a success: Each year, thousands of consumer products benefit from “spin-offs,” integration of technologies and processes originally developed for and by NASA. Aptly titled Spinoff, each issue is 100-plus pages of essential nerd material and trivia fodder, charting the diaspora of space technology.

  • Top French court rules burkini bans violate basic freedoms
    World
    Associated Press

    Top French court rules burkini bans violate basic freedoms

    France's top administrative court on Friday overturned a ban on burkinis in a Mediterranean beach resort, effectively meaning that towns can no longer issue bans on the swimsuits that have divided the country and brought world attention to its fraught relationship with Muslims. The ruling by the Council of State specifically concerns a ban on the Muslim garment in the Riviera town of Villeneuve-Loubet, but the binding decision is expected to impact all the 30 or so French resort municipalities that have issued similar decrees. The bans grew increasingly controversial as images circulated online of some Muslim women being ordered to remove body-concealing garments on French Riviera beaches.

  • World
    Reuters

    Suspected 'terror' attack at Indonesian church; no serious casualties

    Indonesian police were investigating a suspected terror attack by a knife-wielding assailant on a priest during the Sunday service at a church, and a bomb squad had been deployed to determine whether the attacker's backpack contained explosives. There were no serious casualties, though the priest and his attacker suffered minor injuries, according to police in Medan city, northern Sumatra. "A terrorism act was carried out on Sunday morning at the Saint Joseph catholic church," said Rina Sari Ginting, spokeswoman for Medan police in a statement.

  • Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers
    World
    AFP

    Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers

    Venezuela sent an opposition leader who was under house arrest back to jail and expelled a delegation of Ecuadoran lawmakers, amid rising political tension over a campaign to recall leftist President Nicolas Maduro. Former San Cristobal mayor Daniel Ceballos was abruptly taken from his home before dawn by members of the Venezuelan intelligence services, his wife said on Twitter, posting a video of their vehicles as they drove away. Patricia de Ceballos said her husband was loaded into an ambulance where he was shown an order transferring him to a prison in a distant state.

  • Stranded Sailors Saved Thanks To 'SOS' Message After Week on Desert Island
    U.S.
    Inside Edition

    Stranded Sailors Saved Thanks To 'SOS' Message After Week on Desert Island

    A couple of mariners stranded on an uninhabited Micronesian island were saved when a U.S. Navy plane spotted their "SOS" message written in the sand. The search began when officials in Guam received notification Aug. 19 from Pan-Pacific Education and Communication Experiments by Satellite (PEACESAT) of an overdue 18 ft. vessel with two people aboard en route to Tamatam Island, Federated States of Micronesia. This past spring, another group of castaways in Micronesia managed to get themselves rescued with a message on the beach.

  • Mining leader, 2 others, accused in Bolivia official's death
    World
    Associated Press

    Mining leader, 2 others, accused in Bolivia official's death

    Bolivian authorities accused the president of a mining federation and two of his top officials of the killing of deputy interior minister Rodolfo Illanes amid a bitter strike, officials said Saturday. Illanes was kidnapped and beaten to death by striking mine workers on Thursday after to going to the town of Panduro, 80 miles (130 kilometers) south of La Paz, to mediate in the dispute over mining laws and dwindling paychecks. Bolivia's Attorney General's Office has detained 40 miners, among them protest leader Carlos Mamani, president of the National Federation of Mining Cooperatives of Bolivia.

  • World
    Christian Science Monitor

    How North Korea’s merchant ships became a target for UN sanctions

    At a Cuban port in June 2013, the Chong Chon Gang took on secret cargo: some 240 tons of Soviet-era weapons. Later, under the direction of diplomatic staff stationed in Cuba, the ship’s crew of 32 North Koreans layered thousands of bags of raw sugar over the weapons, concealing them from sight. Many of the crew were employees of the state, according to a 2016 United Nations report, with salaries paid by a marine ministry in Pyongyang.

  • Obama presses Congress for Zika funding as worries grow
    Health
    AFP

    Obama presses Congress for Zika funding as worries grow

    US President Barack Obama called on Congress Saturday to step up funding to combat the Zika virus, warning that delay is putting more Americans at risk. Obama's latest appeal, in his weekly radio address, came the day after the US authorities expressed deepening worry about the spread of the mosquito-borne virus, urging that all donated blood be tested for Zika. The Congress has denied past administration requests for Zika funding, instead redirecting funds that had been earmarked to fight Ebola, cancer and other diseases.

  • This Week Fast Forward 8.28.16
    Politics
    ABC News Videos

    This Week Fast Forward 8.28.16

    Speed through the highlights from the latest "This Week." Clinton foundation officials looking for invitations. For major. Donors do you see any problem with that I've been a government affairs. So you know this notion that somehow mother someone who

  • Wildfires burn in Grand Teton National Park
    U.S.
    Yahoo News Photo

    Wildfires burn in Grand Teton National Park

    Popular areas in Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks were welcoming tourists for the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, but a wildfire forced some people to drive a little farther than they expected to get to the festivities. The blaze in Grand Teton National Park shut down a route leading to Yellowstone’s South Entrance, so visitors coming from the south through Wyoming will have to take an hour long detour into Idaho. The wildfire in Grand Teton has burned about 19 square miles since lightning sparked it last month.

  • Merkel rejects Muslim migrant ban, urges fair distribution
    World
    Associated Press

    Merkel rejects Muslim migrant ban, urges fair distribution

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Sunday slammed those countries in Europe who say they won't take in Muslim refugees, a position that several eastern European governments have taken in response to the influx of migrants from the Islamic world. Merkel said she was hopeful that European Union members would reach an agreement on outstanding questions arising from the migrant crisis, one of which is how to fairly distribute asylum-seekers among all the bloc's 28 member states.

  • South Africa's finance minister to be charged for graft -City Press
    World
    Reuters

    South Africa's finance minister to be charged for graft -City Press

    South Africa Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan may be charged this week for graft, the City Press newspaper reported on Sunday, citing senior sources in the police, the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), and the tax service. Thirty witnesses had been lined up to testify against Gordhan and three former officials from the South African Revenue Service (SARS), the paper said. Police summoned Gordhan this week in connection with an investigation into a "rogue spy unit" set up in the revenue service when he headed the organisation, rattling South African markets and sending the rand down 5 percent.

  • Rebels, Colombia eye peace deal strides
    World
    AFP

    Rebels, Colombia eye peace deal strides

    Colombia and Marxist FARC rebels will ink their landmark peace deal officially late next month, authorities said. "The solemn date of the signing will be between September 20 and 26, depending on the schedules and the dignitaries who will be in attendance," said Defense Minister Luis Carlos Villegas. President Juan Manuel Santos has said it could be at UN headquarters, in Bogota or in Cuba.

  • Wife Bites, Stabs Husband With Scissors For Drinking Her Beer: Cops
    U.S.
    Inside Edition

    Wife Bites, Stabs Husband With Scissors For Drinking Her Beer: Cops

    A Pennsylvania woman was arrested last week after cops say she stabbed and bit her husband because he drank her beer.  Tracey Lee Giffin faces an aggravated assault charge in Fayette County after the alleged incident, which cops say occurred last Sunday

  • Lifestyle
    Associated Press

    Couple files lawsuit to bring dozen cats into remodeled home

    A Buncombe County couple is going to court to get permission to keep the 12 cats they refer to as their "tribe" in their refurbished home. The Asheville Citizen-Times reports (http://avlne.ws/2btgiek) Debra and Harry Stonecipher haven't moved into the 6,700 square foot house they recently renovated, and won't until Baby, Dante, Duchess and the nine other indoor cats can come with them.

  • China Is Fueling a Submarine Arms Race in the Asia-Pacific
    World
    Foreign Policy Magazine

    China Is Fueling a Submarine Arms Race in the Asia-Pacific

    With China plowing money into its military machine and making aggressive claims to disputed island chains, Beijing’s regional rivals are investing in the one weapon that can undercut the increasingly potent People’s Liberation Army. Across South and East Asia, China’s neighbors are spending heavily on submarines, purchasing silent diesel-electric machines capable of slipping past Chinese defenses. The leaked plans outlined in minute detail the capabilities of a Scorpene-class vessel purchased by India, and New Delhi immediately demanded that French authorities investigate how the respected DCNS shipbuilder had lost control of the plans.

  • Indonesian priest injured in church attack
    World
    AFP

    Indonesian priest injured in church attack

    A knife-wielding man stabbed a Catholic priest and tried to set off an explosive device at a church in Indonesia on Sunday, police said, the latest attack on religious minorities in the mainly Muslim country. Priest Albert Pandiangan was holding a mass in the city of Medan on the western island of Sumatra when a young man approached him and stabbed him in his left arm, said local chief detective Nur Fallah. The attacker was carrying a homemade explosive device, said Fallah.

  • 4 Tips for Making Healthy Smoothies
    Health
    Consumer Reports

    4 Tips for Making Healthy Smoothies

    “When you use a blender, as compared to some juicers, you’re getting all of the vegetable’s fiber, which helps you feel full,” says Siegel. Bee pollen, creatinine, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), green tea powder, guarana, vitamin C—these are just a few of the extras found in so-called healthy smoothies available at smoothie shops, gyms, and supermarkets.

  • Minnesota sets broadest U.S. limits on chemicals blamed for bee declines
    U.S.
    Reuters

    Minnesota sets broadest U.S. limits on chemicals blamed for bee declines

    Minnesota's governor on Friday ordered the broadest restrictions yet in a U.S. state on the use of agricultural pesticides that have been blamed for hurting bees, fueling concerns that farmers there will not be able to protect crops from insects. Gov. Mark Dayton issued an executive order that requires farmers to verify that they face "an imminent threat of significant crop loss" before using the chemicals, called neonicotinoids. Details of how farmers would prove their need have not yet been determined.

  • Can France Bridge Cultural Divide Over Islam?
    World
    ABC News Videos

    Can France Bridge Cultural Divide Over Islam?

    ABC's Martha Raddatz reports from France on the culture clash over the "burkini" ban.

  • More exhausting than a five-setter: Protecting the US Open
    U.S.
    Associated Press

    More exhausting than a five-setter: Protecting the US Open

    In a less-traveled part of the 46-acre Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, an imposing black metal fence offers a reminder of the multiple security worries that come with hosting the U.S. Open. New York Police Department counterterrorism officials insisted that the fence, near a new 8,000-seat grandstand stadium, be reinforced earlier this year with thick strands of cable capable of withstanding a crash from a truck loaded with explosives. "A lot of this stuff is off the radar, but it goes back to what's happening in the world," the event's security director, Michael Rodriguez, said during a flurry of last-minute preparations for Monday's opening matches.

  • Politics
    Christian Science Monitor

    Why Americans want Gary Johnson at presidential debates

    Three out of five American voters want a third-party candidate to speak during the coming presidential debates, according to the latest Quinnipiac University poll – a sign that Americans want an alternative to this unusually negative presidential race. There are three presidential debates scheduled for September and October. Recommended: Election 101: Who is Gary Johnson?

  • U.S.
    Reuters

    Justice Department to decide charges against Arizona lawman in racial profiling case

    The U.S. Justice Department will decide whether criminal contempt charges will be brought against Arizona lawman Joe Arpaio for violating court orders in a racial profiling case, court documents released late on Friday showed. The criminal referral centers on U.S. District Judge Murray Snow's ruling that Arpaio intentionally violated a 2011 court order barring the sheriff's office from stopping and detaining drivers solely based on the suspicion that they were in the country illegally.

  • U.S.
    Associated Press

    Regulator: Dakota Access pipeline worker killed in accident

    A man working on the four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline was killed in an apparent accident in western North Dakota, a state regulator said Saturday. North Dakota Public Service Commissioner Brian Kalk said the man, whose name has not been released, died of his injuries Friday afternoon. The man was working as subcontractor for Dallas-based operator Energy Transfer Partners, which is building the nearly 1,200-mile pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois.

  • Supporters of Brazil's Rousseff insist she broke no laws
    World
    AFP

    Supporters of Brazil's Rousseff insist she broke no laws

    Brasília (AFP) - The final witnesses in the defense of suspended Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff have testified in her senate impeachment trial, days before a vote that could permanently remove her from power. The one-time Marxist guerrilla, who was imprisoned and tortured under Brazil's military dictatorship in the 1970s, says the charges against her are trumped up and amount to a right-wing coup. Testifying late Saturday on the third day of the impeachment trial were former economy minister Nelson Barbosa and Rio State University law professor Ricardo Lodi.