• NASA's "Spinoff" is the Coolest Magazine You've Never Read
    Science
    The Drive

    NASA's "Spinoff" is the Coolest Magazine You've Never Read

    Since it was founded in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s goals have been civilian. The agency’s main objective, to explore outside our orbit, was part of a larger mission to provide "the most effective utilization of the scientific and engineering resources of the United States." Consider that a success: Each year, thousands of consumer products benefit from “spin-offs,” integration of technologies and processes originally developed for and by NASA. Aptly titled Spinoff, each issue is 100-plus pages of essential nerd material and trivia fodder, charting the diaspora of space technology.

  • Bangladesh police kill 'mastermind' of Dhaka cafe attack
    World
    Reuters

    Bangladesh police kill 'mastermind' of Dhaka cafe attack

     DHAKA (Reuters) - Bangladesh security forces killed three Islamist militants on Saturday, including a Bangladesh-born Canadian citizen accused of masterminding an attack on a cafe in Dhaka last month that killed 22 people, mostly foreigners, police said. The militants were cornered in a hideout on the outskirts of the capital and, having refused to surrender, were killed in the ensuing gunbattle, Monirul Islam, the head of the Dhaka police counterterrorism unit, told Reuters.

  • Addict risks all in deadly Philippine drug war
    World
    AFP

    Addict risks all in deadly Philippine drug war

    Pedicab driver Reyjin dives into a neighbour's house for a quick meth fix, fearful of taking a bullet to the head in Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's brutal war on drugs but unable to quit. More than 2,000 people have died violent deaths since Duterte took office two months ago and immediately implemented his scorched-earth plans to eradicate drugs in society, ordering police to shoot dead traffickers and urging ordinary citizens to kill addicts. Armed police constantly circle in Reyjin's Manila slum community, but he continues to snort the fumes of the highly addictive methamphetamine known as "shabu" that Duterte has warned is destroying the lives of millions of poor Filipinos.

  • Gymkhana 9 Is Allegedly Filming in Buffalo and Uber is Bleeding Money: The Evening Rush
    U.S.
    The Drive

    Gymkhana 9 Is Allegedly Filming in Buffalo and Uber is Bleeding Money: The Evening Rush

    The Evening Rush is your daily roundup of auto, gear, and lifestyle news, all in one place. According to the National Safety Council, traffic fatalities have been on the rise. Listen up New Yorkers: Gymkhana 9 is being filmed in Buffalo.

  • Stranded Sailors Saved Thanks To 'SOS' Message After Week on Desert Island
    U.S.
    Inside Edition

    Stranded Sailors Saved Thanks To 'SOS' Message After Week on Desert Island

    A couple of mariners stranded on an uninhabited Micronesian island were saved when a U.S. Navy plane spotted their "SOS" message written in the sand. The search began when officials in Guam received notification Aug. 19 from Pan-Pacific Education and Communication Experiments by Satellite (PEACESAT) of an overdue 18 ft. vessel with two people aboard en route to Tamatam Island, Federated States of Micronesia. This past spring, another group of castaways in Micronesia managed to get themselves rescued with a message on the beach.

  • Wildfires burn in Grand Teton National Park
    U.S.
    Yahoo News Photo

    Wildfires burn in Grand Teton National Park

    Popular areas in Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks were welcoming tourists for the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, but a wildfire forced some people to drive a little farther than they expected to get to the festivities. The blaze in Grand Teton National Park shut down a route leading to Yellowstone’s South Entrance, so visitors coming from the south through Wyoming will have to take an hour long detour into Idaho. The wildfire in Grand Teton has burned about 19 square miles since lightning sparked it last month.

  • Top French court rules burkini bans violate basic freedoms
    World
    Associated Press

    Top French court rules burkini bans violate basic freedoms

    France's top administrative court on Friday overturned a ban on burkinis in a Mediterranean beach resort, effectively meaning that towns can no longer issue bans on the swimsuits that have divided the country and brought world attention to its fraught relationship with Muslims. The ruling by the Council of State specifically concerns a ban on the Muslim garment in the Riviera town of Villeneuve-Loubet, but the binding decision is expected to impact all the 30 or so French resort municipalities that have issued similar decrees. The bans grew increasingly controversial as images circulated online of some Muslim women being ordered to remove body-concealing garments on French Riviera beaches.

  • Fed's Yellen sees stronger case for interest rate hike
    Business
    Reuters

    Fed's Yellen sees stronger case for interest rate hike

    The Federal Reserve is getting closer to raising interest rates again, the head of the U.S. central bankand other policymakers said on Friday in comments that left the door open for a hike as early as next month. Fed Chair Janet Yellen told a global monetary policy conference that the case for a rate increase had grown stronger, while Fed Vice Chair Stanley Fischer suggested a move could come at the central bank’s September policy meeting if the economy was doing well.

  • Italy Earthquake: The Latest
    World
    The Atlantic

    Italy Earthquake: The Latest

    —The death toll from the magnitude-6 earthquake in central Italy has risen to 290. —The worst-affected areas are the villages of Arquata and Pescara del Tronto in the Marche region, and Accumoli and Amatrice, which are in Lazio. —Amatrice Mayor Sergio Pirozzi warned the city could be isolated if key access roads damaged during the aftershock were not quickly cleared.

  • What You Need to Know About Expired EpiPens
    Business
    Consumer Reports

    What You Need to Know About Expired EpiPens

    Anne McMaster, a retired nurse in Seattle with a serious allergy to bees, used to buy a new EpiPen every year when her current one expired. Instead, she just kept her old injector, figuring an expired EpiPen is better than no EpiPen at all. Although there are some lower-cost alternative injectors on the market, and Mylan, the maker of EpiPen, says it is introducing programs to make the device more affordable for consumers, many Americans are wondering whether it is indeed okay to use expired EpiPens.

  • Amtrak awards Alstom $2.0 bn deal for high-speed trains
    Business
    AFP

    Amtrak awards Alstom $2.0 bn deal for high-speed trains

    US rail operator Amtrak on Friday awarded a $2.0 billion (1.8 billion euros) deal to French manufacturer Alstom to supply new trains for its key Acela service between Washington, New York and Boston. The landmark deal for 28 new passenger trains will boost Amtrak's speed and capacity along its most heavily used and profitable route, with more than 3.5 million passengers a year, from 2021. The trains will carry more than 400 passengers, about one-third more than the existing Acela northeastern corridor express service, with a maximum speed of 300 kilometers per hour (180 miles per hour), though normal speeds will hover near 260 kilometers an hour.

  • China Is Fueling a Submarine Arms Race in the Asia-Pacific
    World
    Foreign Policy Magazine

    China Is Fueling a Submarine Arms Race in the Asia-Pacific

    With China plowing money into its military machine and making aggressive claims to disputed island chains, Beijing’s regional rivals are investing in the one weapon that can undercut the increasingly potent People’s Liberation Army. Across South and East Asia, China’s neighbors are spending heavily on submarines, purchasing silent diesel-electric machines capable of slipping past Chinese defenses. The leaked plans outlined in minute detail the capabilities of a Scorpene-class vessel purchased by India, and New Delhi immediately demanded that French authorities investigate how the respected DCNS shipbuilder had lost control of the plans.

  • U.S.
    Reuters

    Yellowstone employee falls to death in park canyon

    Estefania Liset Mosquera Alcivar, a concession employee, was with a small group of coworkers at the rim of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone shortly after 3:15 a.m. when she fell, according to accounts by her companions, the park's public affairs office said in a statement.

  • Wife Bites, Stabs Husband With Scissors For Drinking Her Beer: Cops
    U.S.
    Inside Edition

    Wife Bites, Stabs Husband With Scissors For Drinking Her Beer: Cops

    A Pennsylvania woman was arrested last week after cops say she stabbed and bit her husband because he drank her beer.  Tracey Lee Giffin faces an aggravated assault charge in Fayette County after the alleged incident, which cops say occurred last Sunday

  • Oregon fair generates buzz with 1st legal pot display in US
    Health
    Associated Press

    Oregon fair generates buzz with 1st legal pot display in US

    Living marijuana plants went on display Friday at the Oregon State Fair, with organizers saying it's the first state fair in the nation to allow cannabis for public viewing. The state voted to legalize recreational marijuana in late 2014. The Oregon State Fair allowed a display about marijuana without any living plants last year and it generated no complaints.

  • Kayla Mueller Part 5: Kayla's Sacrifice Allows Sex Slave to Escape
    Lifestyle
    ABC News Videos

    Kayla Mueller Part 5: Kayla's Sacrifice Allows Sex Slave to Escape

    Even after being raped by ISIS leader, Kayla foregoes her chance to run to save others. There's the Christmas tree. And there's my mom on Christmas eve. Reporter: With Kayla missing now for two christmases in a row, the family's only joy came in the

  • Bolivian president, opposition spar over official's killing
    World
    Associated Press

    Bolivian president, opposition spar over official's killing

    President Evo Morales and his political opponents traded recriminations Friday over the shocking beating death of a high-ranking government official by protesting miners who had blockaded a highway. The killing of Deputy Interior Minister Rodolfo Illanes underscored how Morales, a former coca growers' union leader, has increasingly found himself at odds with the same kind of popular social movements that fueled his rise to power and have made up his political base. "This is a political conspiracy, not a social demand," Morales said at a news conference, accusing his political opponents of backing the miners' cause.

  • South Africa's finance minister to be charged for graft -City Press
    World
    Reuters

    South Africa's finance minister to be charged for graft -City Press

    South Africa Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan may be charged this week for graft, the City Press newspaper reported on Sunday, citing senior sources in the police, the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), and the tax service. Thirty witnesses had been lined up to testify against Gordhan and three former officials from the South African Revenue Service (SARS), the paper said. Police summoned Gordhan this week in connection with an investigation into a "rogue spy unit" set up in the revenue service when he headed the organisation, rattling South African markets and sending the rand down 5 percent.

  • Business
    Christian Science Monitor

    Cybersecurity firms stirs controversy in alleging medical device flaws

    In an apparent first, the investment firm Muddy Waters Capital on Thursday relied on cybersecurity research to recommend that investors bet against a major medical device maker's stock. Muddy Waters issued a detailed litany of serious-sounding – but unconfirmed – flaws affecting a range of devices that St. Jude Medical Inc. manufactures. St. Jude said the flaws apparently uncovered by the cybersecurity firm MedSec were "absolutely untrue." Still, the company's stock price dipped 5 percent Thursday and was trading in negative territory Friday. Regardless of the veracity of MedSec's findings, its decision to reveal research to investment advisors and not to St. Jude or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulators opens a new and uncertain chapter in the relationship between industry, investors, and security researchers.

  • US repatriates 161 Cuban migrants
    U.S.
    AFP

    US repatriates 161 Cuban migrants

    The United States repatriated 161 Cubans this week after intercepting them at sea as they attempted to reach American soil, the US Coast Guard said Friday. Coast Guard patrol boats shuttled the migrants to Bahia de Cabanas, Cuba on three separate trips made Monday, Thursday and Friday, the agency said in a statement. "We discourage anyone from taking to the sea and attempting to reach U.S. soil illegally – they are risking their lives with very little chance of success," Coast Guard Captain Mark Gordon said.

  • Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers
    World
    AFP

    Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers

    Venezuela sent an opposition leader who was under house arrest back to jail and expelled a delegation of Ecuadoran lawmakers, amid rising political tension over a campaign to recall leftist President Nicolas Maduro. Former San Cristobal mayor Daniel Ceballos was abruptly taken from his home before dawn by members of the Venezuelan intelligence services, his wife said on Twitter, posting a video of their vehicles as they drove away. Patricia de Ceballos said her husband was loaded into an ambulance where he was shown an order transferring him to a prison in a distant state.

  • Minnesota sets broadest U.S. limits on chemicals blamed for bee declines
    U.S.
    Reuters

    Minnesota sets broadest U.S. limits on chemicals blamed for bee declines

    Minnesota's governor on Friday ordered the broadest restrictions yet in a U.S. state on the use of agricultural pesticides that have been blamed for hurting bees, fueling concerns that farmers there will not be able to protect crops from insects. Gov. Mark Dayton issued an executive order that requires farmers to verify that they face "an imminent threat of significant crop loss" before using the chemicals, called neonicotinoids. Details of how farmers would prove their need have not yet been determined.

  • Ex-wife says Trump campaign CEO made anti-Semitic remarks
    Politics
    Associated Press

    Ex-wife says Trump campaign CEO made anti-Semitic remarks

    An ex-wife of Donald Trump's new campaign CEO, Stephen Bannon, said Bannon made anti-Semitic remarks when the two battled over sending their daughters to private school nearly a decade ago, according to court papers reviewed Friday by The Associated Press. "He said he doesn't like Jews and that he doesn't like the way they raise their kids to be 'whiney brats,'" Piccard said in a 2007 court filing.

  • 5 Fast Facts: 2016 Land Rover LR4
    Lifestyle
    J.D. Power and Associates

    5 Fast Facts: 2016 Land Rover LR4

    Body Style: SUVAbstract: The LR4 remains the most traditional SUV in Land Rover’s stable with a luxury interior that can seat at least 5. Here are five fast facts about the 2016 Land Rover Discovery...Year: 2 016 The Land Rover LR4 is a boxy

  • Notting Hill Carnival
    World
    Yahoo News Photo

    Notting Hill Carnival

    Nearly one million people are expected by the organizers Sunday and Monday in the streets of west London’s Notting Hill to celebrate Caribbean culture at a carnival considered the largest street demonstration in Europe. (Getty)See more news-related photo