Hmmm... the page you're looking for isn't here. Try searching above.
  • Parents of A.J. Freund Forced 5-Year-Old in Cold Shower Before Fatal Beating: Prosecutors

    Scott Olson/GettyAndrew “A.J.” Freund, the 5-year-old Illinois boy whose body was found Wednesday morning in the woods, was forced into a cold shower “for an extended period of time” before he was beaten “repeatedly” to death by his parents on April 15, prosecutors allege.Nine days after his murder, the missing toddler’s body was found wrapped in plastic and buried in a shallow grave about seven miles away from his Crystal Lake home. The toddler’s parents, 36-year-old JoAnn Cunningham and 60-year-old Andrew Freund Sr., were arrested and charged hours after the Wednesday discovery with first-degree murder, aggravated battery, domestic battery, and failure to report a missing child or child death. Freund Sr. was also charged with concealment of a death.“It was apparent to me that nobody was going to sleep and nobody will sleep until justice is brought for AJ. This is the beginning of that process,” said FBI Agent Jeffrey Sallet at a Wednesday afternoon press conference.The couple appeared at McHenry County Circuit Court on Thursday morning, wearing orange prison jumpsuits as Judge Robert A. Wilbrandt set their bond at $5 million each. Both were represented by public defenders, who did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment.Prosecutors allege in a criminal complaint that three days before the 5-year-old’s parents reported him missing, he was forced into the shower and then “struck” to death.Local, state, and federal authorities launched a multi-county search for the little boy, finally finding his body after the couple was confronted with cell-phone evidence, Crystal Lake Police Chief Jim Black told The Daily Beast on Thursday. Search crews recovered the toddler’s body in the woods and technicians immediately removed evidence from the family’s home, including a child’s mattress and a shovel. An official cause of death has not yet been determined, but A.J.’s autopsy is scheduled for Thursday afternoon, the McHenry County Coroner’s Office said. “To A.J.’s family, it is my hope that you may have some solace knowing that A.J. is no longer suffering, and his killers have been brought to justice,” Black said Wednesday. “To A.J., we know you’re at peace playing in heaven’s playground, and are happy you no longer have to suffer.”According to Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) records, A.J. was born in 2013 with “opiates in his system,” and was removed from his parents’ custody a month later. He was placed in foster care, records show, for two years before he was returned to Cunningham and Freund Sr. in June 2015. Twice last year, DCFS caseworkers were called to the Freund home to investigate separate allegations of neglect, but both were “determined to be unfounded,” a spokesperson said Thursday. In December, when police called the agency after Cunningham was arrested on a misdemeanor traffic charge, authorities documented “significant problems” with the couple’s “cluttered” and “dirty” home, including an “overwhelming” “smell of feces” in the toddlers’ bedroom, documents show. Crystal Lake Police also confirmed officers visited the home, which is an hour outside of Chicago, about 10 times over the past five years, and often noted the poor condition of the house in their reports. “This news is heartbreaking. Protecting vulnerable children who come to our attention is at the core of our mission at DCFS. All of us feel this loss,” Marc Smith, acting director of DCFS, said in a statement obtained by The Daily Beast. “Our priority is the care and safety of Andrew’s younger sibling.”A DCFS spokesman confirmed Thursday that the couple’s younger son, 3-year-old Parker, has been placed in protective custody.Cunningham and Freund are scheduled to appear in court on April 29. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here

  • Congo park ranger tells of taking viral selfie with gorillas

    A park ranger in Congo has described how he captured a selfie with two gorillas that went viral. Mathieu Shamavu, a ranger at Virunga National Park in eastern Congo, said he was checking his phone when he noticed two female orphaned gorillas, Ndakazi and Ndeze, mimicking his movements, so he took a picture with them. The gorillas look as if they're posing for the camera and when Shamavu posted the picture on social media on Saturday it quickly clocked up thousands of likes and comments.

  • Councilwoman shamed for her 'lazy' work outfit: 'Why does a big girl think she can wear leggings?'

    "This is classic misogyny," says Emily LaDouceur, councilwoman for Berea, Kentucky.

  • Selena Gomez Says Her Girl Squad Kept Her From Hitting Rock Bottom

    Selena Gomez got candid in Coach's new "Dream It Real" podcast on Wednesday, opening up about therapy, her support circle of friends and what she believes fans don't know about her. Listen to what Selena had to say.

  • Man credited with calling the 2008 crisis says the next 20 years in the stock market will 'break a lot of hearts'

    Jeremy Grantham, an investor credited with predicting the 2000 and 2008 downturns, told CNBC on Thursday that investors should get inured to lackluster returns in the stock market for the next two decades, after a century of handsome gains. “In the last 100 years, we're used to delivering perhaps 6%,” but the U.S. market will be delivering real returns of about 2% or 3% on average over next 20 years, the value investor and co-founder of Boston-based asset manager GMO told CNBC in a rare interview. Over the past five years, the S&P 500 index (SPX) has produced a compound annual growth rate of 8.1%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) has boasted a CAGR of 9.1%, while the Nasdaq Composite Index (COMP) has registered a compound return of 11.4% over the same period, according to FactSet data.

  • Netflix revealed their most-streamed show, and we have a feeling you won't be surprised

    Thanks to the magic of Netflix, we now have round-the-clock access to thousands of TV shows. And while all that choice is definitely exciting, it doesn’t make deciding what to watch any easier.

  • 13-year-old girl dies after being placed on life support two days after attack outside middle school

    Middle School student, Kashala Francis, told her mother, Mamie Jackson, that on Thursday she was attacked by two girls after school and at some point, a third girl jumped in and kicked her in the head.