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  • U.S.
    Yahoo Finance

    Certain pockets of America are feeling a 'disproportionate impact' from the coronavirus pandemic

    A new analysis by Yahoo Finance and Economic Innovation Group (EIG) highlights a subset of America for which the coronavirus pandemic has been particularly devastating.

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  • World
    The Telegraph

    'When the internet goes down the night raids start': Inside the deadly phenomenon of web shutdowns

    Late in a December evening Masrat Jan, a 40 year old mother of four from the village of Sangria Barzol in Indian-administered Kashmir, developed sudden chest pain and begged her husband to get her to hospital. Her family rushed her to the nearest hospital. But because it had no cardiac specialists, she was referred to another facility more than another hour’s drive away. She died there five minutes after arrival - a collateral victim, doctors explained, of a draconian security environment. “The Doctors told us if there was an Internet, they could have contacted the cardiologists in Srinagar and stabilized her,” her father, Gul Mohammad Shah, told the Telegraph. “She would have survived had there been an internet service available.” India’s government shutdown internet, mobile phone and landline services in Kashmir before stripping the region of its partial autonomy on August 5, 2019, saying it wanted to stave off civilian protests.

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  • Business
    Axios

    Miami mayor: "Gentrification is real" but government has limited ability to stop it

    Miami Mayor Francis Suarez's ambitions to attract Big Tech has generated a lot of headlines — but it will likely come with some negative impacts for current residents, for which the mayor admits there may not be solutions.What he's saying: "Gentrification is real," Suarez told "Axios on HBO." But even with his efforts to promote affordable housing, he argues that "government has a limited amount of resources and a limited amount of ability to stop things that are market driven."Get market news worthy of your time with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free.What's happening: Since a tweet that went viral on Dec. 4, Suarez has been chatting it up with tech billionaires like Elon Musk on Twitter about building car tunnels under the city, while others — like PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel and Shutterstock founder Jon Oringer — have moved to the city.Blackstone signed a long-term lease in downtown Miami in January, and Suarez says Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan also are moving to the city.The founders of smart mattress company Eight Sleep are offering discounts to businesses that make the move.Between the lines: Businesses aren't just coming for the sun and sand, though. Miami already offers tax credits of up to $50,000 a year for companies that relocate to its downtown, and Suarez tells "Axios on HBO" he's looking to "triple" the size of the program.He also wants to provide further incentives through the Venture Miami office and possibly even more through Miami-Dade County."What we don't want to do is we don't want to lose companies because we're not competitive," Suarez said during an interview. "You know, my, my philosophy has always been: 'If we're even, [companies are] leaving."Yes, but: Experts warn that Miami already has a massive economic inequality problem that would only be exacerbated by an influx of tech companies and their wealthy heads."[T]he powers attempting to help the region cope with global warming are barely focused on these inequalities, and that lack of vision could seriously complicate efforts to save South Florida," Mario Alejandro Ariza wrote for Yale's School of the Environment in September. By the numbers: Miami was home to 35 billionaires — about 5% of the U.S. total — as of September, and has likely added significantly to that number in recent months. Meanwhile, 40% of the households in Miami-Dade County are working poor and nearly one-fifth live below the poverty line, Ariza notes.Miami's coastal location also make it seriously vulnerable to the effects of climate change, which Ariza argues are likely to be borne overwhelmingly by the city's poorer Black and brown residents.What to watch: "The plan is to continue to build more affordable housing. The plan is to also give people high-paying jobs," Suarez says.However, that has been the plan as long as Suarez has been in office, and Miami has a relative rate of inequality similar to that of developing countries like Panama and Colombia, according to the global standard Gini coefficient, a measure of income inequality.More from Axios: Sign up to get the latest market trends with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free

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  • U.S.
    The Telegraph

    Parish church discovers its painting of Last Supper bears touch of Titian

    A vast painting of The Last Supper that has hung in a parish church in Herefordshire since the turn of the last century is being seen in a new light following the discovery of crucial evidence that links it to the workshop of Titian, one of the 16th-century’s greatest masters. A 12.5-foot-long painting in St Michael and All Angels church in Ledbury, was long assumed to be a much later copy. Hanging high on a wall, in a dark and dirty state, its potential had been missed. Ronald Moore, a conservator and art historian, removed centuries of discoloured varnish and was astonished to discover Titian’s inscribed name, a bold under-drawing worthy of Titian himself and an apostle that must be a portrait of him as the facial features precisely match his self-portrait. In a three-year study, he linked it to a 1775 letter in which its former owner, John Skippe, an Oxford-educated artist and noted collector, wrote of buying “a most capital and well-preserved picture by Titian” from a wealthy Venetian family, adding that it was commissioned by a Venetian convent. It was donated to the Ledbury church in 1909 by one of Skippe’s descendants. “It’s so big and nobody’s taken any notice of it for 110 years,” Mr Moore said. “Anything coming from Titian’s workshop is very important indeed.”

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