Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States. Established pursuant to Article III of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors.
Get the latest news and discussion about the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Supreme Court to hear census citizenship question dispute
    Reuters

    Supreme Court to hear census citizenship question dispute

    The Supreme Court said in a brief order that it will hear arguments on Feb. 19. Eighteen U.S. states, 15 cities and a handful of civil rights groups are asking U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman in New York to remove the citizenship question, saying it will frighten immigrants into abstaining from the 2020 census, costing their communities political representation and access to federal aid due to a population undercount. The justices on Nov. 2 allowed the trial to go ahead but blocked the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the U.S. Census Bureau.

  • Bad To The Bone: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Gets Down In Epic 'SNL' Rap Video
    HuffPost

    Bad To The Bone: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Gets Down In Epic 'SNL' Rap Video

    After bouncing back from three broken ribs, tough-as-nails Supreme Court judge

  • Matt Whitaker faces challenge in Supreme Court
    Yahoo View

    Matt Whitaker faces challenge in Supreme Court

    President Trump’s appointment of Matt Whitaker as acting attorney general is facing a challenge on the legal front, as opponents of his appointment are asking the Supreme Court to rule that, because the Senate has not confirmed him.

  • Supreme Court turns down appeal from British woman on Texas death row
    HoustonChronicle.com

    Supreme Court turns down appeal from British woman on Texas death row

    The Supreme Court last week turned down an appeal from a British woman sentenced to die for a Harris County murder-kidnapping, moving the case one step closer to a possible execution date. Linda Carty was sent to death row in 2001 after she was convicted of masterminding a plot to murder her 20-year-old neighbor and steal the woman's baby in order to save her own common-law marriage. In the years since the killing of Joana Rodriguez, Carty has consistently professed her innocence, insisting she was railroaded by prosecutors who failed to turn over evidence and coerced witnesses to win a conviction. Yet the nation's highest court has now turned down her most recent appeal without comment, refusing

  • Case could upset a key source of cash for local courts
    seattlepi.com

    Case could upset a key source of cash for local courts

    Caption Close DETROIT (AP) — The Michigan Supreme Court is hearing a dispute over $1,611. The result, however, will carry a much higher price, impacting millions of dollars now raked in from criminal defendants who must pay to keep the heat turned up, the air conditioners humming and the floors waxed in local courts all over the state. The Legislature and Gov. Rick Snyder have given local governments sweeping authority to put a portion of court operating costs on the backs of people convicted of crimes, often the poor. The question for the Supreme Court on Monday is whether the law is an illegal tax. Counties, prosecutors and the attorney general's office are urging the Supreme Court to keep

  • Trump Makes Risqué Joke About Antonin Scalia's Widow Having 9 Kids During Medal of Freedom Ceremony
    People

    Trump Makes Risqué Joke About Antonin Scalia's Widow Having 9 Kids During Medal of Freedom Ceremony

    Trump Makes Risqué Joke to Antonin Scalia's Widow at Medal of Freedom Ceremony

  • Backlog of divorce cases in Supreme Court to be cleared in 2019, says chief justice
    Jamaica Gleaner

    Backlog of divorce cases in Supreme Court to be cleared in 2019, says chief justice

    WESTERN BUREAU: Chief Justice Bryan Sykes is projecting that the current list of divorce cases before the Supreme Court will be cleared by 2019, once the relevant documents are submitted and each matter is disposed of within 16 weeks. Sykes made the projection while delivering the keynote address at the Jamaican Bar Association's 45th annual Continuing Legal Education Conference last evening, at the Hilton Rose Hall Resort in Montego Bay. The conference's theme was “The 21st Century Lawyer: Technology, Compliance and Forensics”. In his address, Sykes said the successful application of the strategy to dispose of divorce cases within 16 weeks was proposed by the Supreme Court's matrimonial division.

  • CBI vs CBI: DSP Ashwini Gupta moves Supreme Court over repatriation to IB
    Business Standard India

    CBI vs CBI: DSP Ashwini Gupta moves Supreme Court over repatriation to IB

    Amidst the ongoing feud inside the premier investigation agency, another CBI officer has moved the Supreme Court challenging his repatriation to the Intelligence Bureau, terming it "unjustified" and "malafide". Deputy SP Ashwini Kumar Gupta has alleged that he was repatriated to his parent Intelligence Bureau (IB) cadre as he was investigating various corruption charges against CBI Special Director Rakesh Asthana, who has been divested of his duties and sent on leave along with CBI Director Alok Kumar Verma. Gupta, in his plea, said he had joined the Intelligence Bureau in January 1999 and inducted on deputation to the CBI in July 2014, initially for three years, till June 2017. Subsequently,

  • CIC again asks PMO, RBI to disclose wilful defaulters' list, Rajan's letter
    wap.business-standard.com

    CIC again asks PMO, RBI to disclose wilful defaulters' list, Rajan's letter

    Severely admonishing the RBI and the PMO, the Central Information Commission has again directed them to disclose the list of wilful defaulters and Raghuram Rajan's letter on bad loans.   In an exhaustive 66-page order, the panel pulled up the Prime Minister's Office for not complying with its directive to disclose the letter from former RBI Governor Rajan on bad loans. Information Commissioner Sridhar Acharyulu said, "If there is any objection based on any exception, the PMO should have pleaded such provision and justify their denial."  He said the PMO refused to comply with the direction of disclosure of action on Rajan's letter on "grounds which are not legal, which is unfortunate". Acharyulu

  • Bustle

    11 Sonia Sotomayor Quotes We Can All Learn From

    Even before she joined the Supreme Court, Justice Sonia Sotomayor established herself as a person ready and willing to take a strong stance and refuse to back down. It's unsurprising, then, that looking across her career, you can find numerous quotes from Sotomayor that will inspire you and make you think about things in a totally different way. Sotomayor was an Obama nominee for the Supreme Court, but before that, she was the daughter of a Puerto Rican family that moved to the Bronx, according to Biography.com. Driven by a mother who pushed them fervently towards higher education and her own desire to become a judge, Sotomayor went to Princeton and rose to the top of her class both there and,

  • Dismissed and denied justice at the Supreme Court? - JCSA helping fired employee fight to get his job back
    Jamaica Gleaner

    Dismissed and denied justice at the Supreme Court? - JCSA helping fired employee fight to get his job back

    After 11 years as a clerk at the Supreme Court, Lloyd Smith was fired last year in what he believes was an unfair retaliation to his complaints about the lack of staff evaluation, the constant changing of his duties, and his concerns after being bypassed for promotion. And Smith is getting the support of the Jamaica Civil Service Association (JCSA), which has taken up his case to right a wrong it believes was carried out by the court administrators who recommended his dismissal to the Services Commission. "We are aware of Mr Smith's case and we appealed to the level of the Governor General's Privy Council, and it rejected the appeal and didn't say on what grounds," O'Neil Grant, president of the JCSA, told The Sunday Gleaner.

  • Canada's Supreme Court gets case of woman fined for escalator conduct
    Daily Mail

    Canada's Supreme Court gets case of woman fined for escalator conduct

    Canada's Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case of a woman who was detained and fined more than $400 Canadian dollars for refusing to hold onto an escalator handrail inside a subway station nearly a decade ago. On May 13, 2009, Bela Kosoian, a native of Georgia, was approached by a police officer inside the Montmorency subway station in the Montreal suburb of Laval because she disregarded a pictogram instructing commuters to hold onto the railing of the escalator. Kosoian pushed back, saying that to her, the pictogram was not an 'obligation.' As the commuter was rummaging through her bag in search of cash to purchase her ticket while riding the escalator, the officer – a six-year veteran on

  • Attorney general sides with Rhode Island synagogue
    HoustonChronicle.com

    Attorney general sides with Rhode Island synagogue

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The attorney general of Rhode Island asked the U.S. Supreme Court Friday to review and reverse a lower court's decision that gave a New York congregation control of Rhode Island's Touro Synagogue and a set of bells valued in the millions. Attorney General Peter Kilmartin filed a friend of the court brief arguing that the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals committed a legal error by not following or even referencing any Rhode Island law on charitable trusts, which is binding on a federal court in this type of case. Touro Synagogue in Newport is the oldest synagogue in the U.S., dating to 1763. Congregation Jeshuat Israel currently worships there. "Touro Synagogue represents

  • Esquire

    When Will the Supreme Court Get Fed Up With Crooked Republican Gerrymanders?

    Concerned about black and brown and other inconvenient voters actually voting, the Republicans in Virginia gerrymandered the daylights out of their electoral maps, as did Republican majorities in a great number of state legislatures around the country. They also got caught, as did Republican majorities in a great number of state legislatures around the country. They also got slammed in federal court, as did Republican majorities in a great number of state legislatures around the country. The court forced the map to be redrawn, which is in the process of happening at the moment. Over this same stretch of time, the Republicans in Virginia nearly lost their legislative majorities. This did not stop