Russia investigation

The 2017–present Special Counsel investigation is an ongoing United States law enforcement investigation of the Russian government′s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including investigation of any possible links and/or coordination between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and the Russian government, "and any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.
Latest news and discussion surrounding the Russia investigation.
  • Reuters

    U.S. judge agrees five Manafort trial witnesses may testify with immunity

    By Sarah N. Lynch ALEXANDRIA, Va. (Reuters) - A U.S. judge said he would rule later on Monday on whether to delay the criminal trial of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and he would make public the identity of five witnesses granted immunity to testify. U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III also said the office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller must provide a list of about 30 witnesses to lawyers for Manafort, who had sought a delay in his criminal trial scheduled to start this week on bank and tax fraud charges.

  • Where special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation stands right now
    Good Morning America

    Where special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation stands right now

    The first trial in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is set to begin this week when former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort heads to court in Alexandria, Virginia. Although Manafort is the first to face trial, the recent indictment of 12 Russian military intelligence officers could be a sign that Mueller's investigation is heating up.

  • Moon-Strzok No More, Lisa Page Spills the Beans
    consortiumnews.com

    Moon-Strzok No More, Lisa Page Spills the Beans

    The meaning of a crucial text message between two FBI officials appears to have been finally explained, and it's not good news for the Russia-gate faithful, as Ray McGovern explains. It was clearly a bad-luck day for Strzok, when on Friday the 13th this month Page gave her explanation of the text to the House Judiciary and Oversight/Government Reform Committees and in effect threw her lover, Strzok, under the bus. Strzok's text did not come out of the blue. For the previous ten months he and his FBI subordinates had been trying every-which-way to ferret out some “there” — preferably a big “there” — but had failed miserably. It is appearing more and more likely that there was nothing left for

  • Trump tries to cast fresh doubt on Mueller's 'Witch Hunt'
    Associated Press

    Trump tries to cast fresh doubt on Mueller's 'Witch Hunt'

    Trump also said former campaign adviser Carter Page, the subject of government documents released over the weekend, wasn't a spy or an agent of Russia. "Carter Page wasn't a spy, wasn't an agent of the Russians - he would have cooperated with the FBI. It was a fraud and a hoax designed to target Trump," the president said in a series of tweets quoting Tom Fitton, president of the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch.

  • After a week of walkbacks, Trump returns to doubting Russian election interference
    Orlando Sentinel

    After a week of walkbacks, Trump returns to doubting Russian election interference

    Capping a week of drama, back tracking, a double negative and blistering statements from allies about his attitude toward Russian election interference, President Donald Trump on Sunday was back to referring to "a big hoax." Trump spent days trying to reassure the country that he accepts that the longtime foe interfered in the 2016 election after his public undermining of U.S. intelligence agencies in Helsinki while standing alongside Russian President Vladimir Putin. But Trump cast doubt once again in a Sunday tweet, diminishing at least the significance, if not the existence, of the interference and the U.S. investigation into Russia's actions. "So President Obama knew about Russia before the

  • After a week of walkbacks, Trump returns to doubting Russian election interference
    Chicago Tribune

    After a week of walkbacks, Trump returns to doubting Russian election interference

    Capping a week of drama, back tracking, a double negative and blistering statements from allies about his attitude toward Russian election interference, President Donald Trump on Sunday was back to referring to "a big hoax." Trump spent days trying to reassure the country that he accepts that the longtime foe interfered in the 2016 election after his public undermining of U.S. intelligence agencies in Helsinki while standing alongside Russian President Vladimir Putin. But Trump cast doubt once again in a Sunday tweet, diminishing at least the significance, if not the existence, of the interference and the U.S. investigation into Russia's actions. "So President Obama knew about Russia before the

  • Trump once again calls for end to Mueller probe
    AFP

    Trump once again calls for end to Mueller probe

    "A disgrace to America," Trump tweeted, referring to the rationale prosecutors used to place a former campaign advisor, Carter Page, under FBI surveillance. Trump has come under a barrage of criticism over the past week for what was seen as overly conciliatory treatment of Russian President Vladimir Putin at their summit in Helsinki. Mueller, a former FBI director, is investigating whether Trump's campaign colluded with Russia's covert attempt to sway the US elections in favor of the former reality TV star, and if the president obstructed justice.

  • Little public support for Trump in doubting Russian interference (POLL)
    Good Morning America

    Little public support for Trump in doubting Russian interference (POLL)

    A majority of Americans disapprove of Donald Trump casting doubt about U.S. intelligence on Russian interference in the 2016 election, with relatively modest support for the president even in his own party and among conservatives in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll. The public by a 17-point margin also says America’s leadership in the world has gotten weaker, not stronger, under Trump.

  • The Week (RSS)

    10 things you need to know today: July 22, 2018

    The Department of Justice on Saturday made public the FBI's applications for warrants to surveil former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page in connection to Russian election interference. The 412-page release says the FBI "believe[d] Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian government ... to undermine and influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential election in violation of U.S. criminal law." Page denies such accusations and has not been charged. The heavily redacted applications were made to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and were published thanks to information requests from media outlets.

  • Trump suggests Cohen secretly taping him discussing payment to Playboy model might have been 'illegal'
    The Independent

    Trump suggests Cohen secretly taping him discussing payment to Playboy model might have been 'illegal'

    Donald Trump has said it was "unheard of and perhaps illegal" for his lawyer to tape him, following reports that he was secretly recorded discussing payments to a Playboy model who claimed they had had an affair. In a joint attack, the US leader criticised his former attorney and long time confidante Michael Cohen and special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, on Twitter. Mr Trump has already denounced the move as a "disgraceful situation".

  • Trump’s True Feelings About Russian Election Interference Are Clear
    HuffPost

    Trump’s True Feelings About Russian Election Interference Are Clear

    In February, Adm. Mike Rogers, then chief of the U.S. Cyber Command, was asked

  • Houston Chronicle

    Reporter's lawyer responds to plagiarism probe

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on a reporter who lost her job over allegations she used uncredited information from other publications (all times local): 5:30 p.m. A North Carolina reporter who lost her job in a plagiarism probe contends she wasn't given an adequate opportunity to respond to allegations that she used uncredited information from other publications. The News & Observer announced Anne Blythe's departure on its website this week. The Raleigh newspaper says it found at least a dozen instances of Blythe taking phrases, sentences or paragraphs from other outlets without properly attributing the information. On Friday, a lawyer representing Blythe issued a statement on her behalf. Attorney