Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico, officially the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and briefly called Porto Rico, is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the northeast Caribbean Sea, approximately 1,000 miles southeast of Miami, Florida. An archipelago among the Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico includes the eponymous main island and several smaller islands, such as Mona, Culebra, and Vieques. The capital and most populous city is San Juan. The territory's total population is approximately 3.4 million.
Latest news and discussion on hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.
  • WOWT Omaha

    Puerto Ricans worry about future if embattled governor stays

    The political crisis in Puerto Rico has escalated to a point where many wonder how Gov. Ricardo Rosselló will be able to govern the U.S. territory in the coming days and possibly weeks amid the massive protests to oust him. Rosselló dug his heels in late Monday after what seems to have been the biggest protest the island has seen in nearly two decades, telling Fox News that he has already apologized and made amends following the leak of an offensive, obscenity-laden online chat between him and his advisers that triggered the crisis. "We can endure anything," said Francisco Javier Díaz, a 30-year-old chemical engineer from the central mountain town of Corozal. Tuesday marked the 11th consecutive day of protests as government officials around Rosselló keep resigning.

  • University of Puerto Rico Joins Caris Life Sciences' Precision Oncology Alliance
    PR Newswire

    University of Puerto Rico Joins Caris Life Sciences' Precision Oncology Alliance

    Puerto Rico's primary healthcare and medical research institution becomes the 28th member of Caris' collaborative network dedicated to making cancer treatment more precise and effective. IRVING, Texas ...

  • Locals In South Florida Join Mass Protests Pushing For Resignation Of Puerto Rico's Governor
    CBS Miami

    Locals In South Florida Join Mass Protests Pushing For Resignation Of Puerto Rico's Governor

    U.S. Soccer Women's National Team Advances To 3rd Straight World Cup Final Following Victory Over England

  • Mom of girl who died on cruise ship calls tragedy "unfathomable"
    CBS News

    Mom of girl who died on cruise ship calls tragedy "unfathomable"

    There are "a million things" the cruise company could have done to prevent the death of an 18-month-old Indiana girl who fell from an open window on a cruise ship in Puerto Rico, the toddler's mother said in an interview broadcast Monday. Speaking publicly for the first time since Chloe Wiegand died, her mother, Kimberley Wiegand, told NBC's "Today" show her family plans to sue Royal Caribbean Cruises for "not having a safer situation on the 11th floor of that cruise ship." "I never want another mother to have to experience this or to see what I had to see or to scream how I had to scream," she told NBC. Michael Winkleman, the family's attorney, has challenged a Puerto Rico police report that

  • SOMOS Productions, Endemol Shine Boomdog and Piñolywood Studios Start Production Of Súbete A Mi Moto In Mexico And Puerto Rico
    PR Newswire

    SOMOS Productions, Endemol Shine Boomdog and Piñolywood Studios Start Production Of Súbete A Mi Moto In Mexico And Puerto Rico

    MIAMI, July 22, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Súbete A mi Moto (Get on my motorcycle), the series about the life of the Puerto Rican band Menudo co-produced by SOMOS Productions (the production company of SOMOS Group) along with Piñolywood Studios and Endemol Shine Boomdog, will start production in Mexico City on July 29, to then continue filming in Puerto Rico. Súbete a Mi Moto tells the saga and the unprecedented success of the Puerto Rican band that launched the careers of music stars such as Ricky Martin, Draco Rosa, Johnny Lozada, Ricky Meléndez and others.

  • WBEN 930am

    McConnell promises budget vote before recess

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the debt and budget agreement between the White House and Congress (all times local): 6:35 p.m. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is promising the Senate will vote on the budget deal agreed to by congressional leaders and the White House before senators leave town for the August recess. The Republican leader said Monday he's "very encouraged" by the agreement reached by President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. McConnell says the "reality of divided government means this is not exactly the deal Republicans would have written on our own." But he says all sides have made "enormous strides" funding national defense recently and the deal "is what we need

  • Mother: Family will sue cruise company over toddler's death
    WSAV-TV

    Mother: Family will sue cruise company over toddler's death

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — There are “a million things” the cruise company could have done to prevent the death of an 18-month-old Indiana girl who fell to her death from an open window on a cruise ship in Puerto Rico, the toddler's mother said in an interview broadcast Monday. Speaking publicly for the first time since Chloe Wiegand died, her mother, Kimberley Wiegand, told NBC's “Today ” show that her family will sue Royal Caribbean Cruises for “not having a safer situation on the 11th floor of that cruise ship.” Michael Winkleman, the family's attorney, has challenged a Puerto Rico police report that says Chloe Wiegand's grandfather dropped the toddler out of a window July 7th when the Freedom of

  • Rossello Clings to Office as Puerto Ricans Debate Impeachment
    Bloomberg

    Rossello Clings to Office as Puerto Ricans Debate Impeachment

    (Bloomberg) -- As protesters flood Puerto Rican cities demanding that Governor Ricardo Rossello resign, the man himself has ducked local reporters and stayed out of sight as demonstrations surrounded the executive mansion in the capital’s colonial quarter.Meanwhile, in the bankrupt commonwealth’s legislature, pressure is growing to remove Rossello if he refuses to go on his own. Lawmakers convened a panel of lawyers to evaluate whether Rossello can be impeached after the publication of scabrous text messages that insulted rivals and ordinary residents, and widespread allegations of corruption that have resulted in six indictments, including two former administration officials.“If the governor doesn’t resign in the next two or three weeks, then he may be confronted with a formal impeachment process,” said Kenneth McClintock, a former commonwealth secretary of state and senate president from Rossello’s New Progressive Party. Lawmakers “are feeling the public pressure, but they’re also aware that they have to follow legislative formalities. It’s not an immediate process.”Read more: What You Need to Know About Puerto Rico’s Political UnrestThe U.S. commonwealth’s worst political crisis in decades has intensified for almost two weeks with Puerto Ricans pouring into streets to call on Rossello to step down. The publication of the leaked text messages unleashed years of pent-up anger over the island’s governance amid a debt crisis, an economic recession that has lasted more than a decade and a fitful recovery from the devastation of Hurricane Maria in 2017.“Puerto Ricans feel that they’re on an airplane and the pilot has gone crazy,” said Eduardo Bhatia, minority leader of Puerto Rico’s senate and a member of the opposition Popular Democratic Party. “We’re afraid of having this guy with no credibility as governor, and we’re losing minute by minute the trust of people in the government of the United States who are going to disburse money for hurricane relief.”The situation may impede the island’s record bankruptcy, which is being managed by a federal oversight board negotiating with bondholders to reduce billions of debt. There are almost $18 billion of bonds tied to the central government and a pension system on the hook for an estimated $50 billion owed to current and future retirees. The government electric utility also wants to restructure $9 billion of debt. The board aims to submit a workout plan in the next few weeks, and a judge will hold a hearing in the case Wednesday.Changing TunesRossello has been battered on all sides, with federal lawmakers and Democratic presidential candidates calling for his departure and President Donald Trump continuing a drumbeat of accusations that the commonwealth misspent billions in disaster aid. The president in 2017 called Rossello “a great guy and leader,” but Monday said he has “done a terrible job,” and that the federal aid is in “the hands of incompetent people and very corrupt people.”On Monday, tens of thousands marched in San Juan, paralyzing the city and shouting their fury with the governor, who has said he won’t run for re-election in 2020 and stepped down from leadership of his party. At night, thousands of of protesters again surrounded the governor’s mansion, banging on pots and pans, dancing to reggaeton music and, in a new fashion statement, sporting t-shirts depicting Rossello’s severed head being held up by the hair.Paper ChaseNo matter how intense, protests haven’t achieved their ultimate goal.Rossello’s fate may now rest in the hands of his party, which controls both chambers of the legislature. House Speaker Carlos “Johnny” Mendez asked three attorneys to prepare a report on whether Rossello’s conduct had risen to an impeachable offense. That report is expected next week. The Puerto Rico Bar Association has said a group of its members concluded that there is sufficient evidence to move ahead with impeachment based on Rossello’s conduct.The island’s secretary of state would become governor if Rossello were to leave, according to Puerto Rico’s 1952 constitution. But that position is vacant after Luis Rivera Marin left the post amid the chat scandal. Next in line of succession is Secretary of Justice Wanda Vazquez.Donner Party“The impeachment process is inevitable,” said Phillip Arroyo, a political analyst who worked in the island’s Department of State. “What you’ll start seeing is political cannibalism within the party. The question will be whether it gets to a point where the senate will convict him.”Calls and emails to the governor’s office and majority leaders in the house and senate seeking comment were not returned.While the governor hasn’t spoken to reporters on the island, he was interviewed Monday -- in English -- on Fox News. He reiterated his plan to stay in office, and said he supported a federal funds czar to oversee spending. “I am fully committed to battling corruption here in Puerto Rico and that will be the focus for the remainder of my administration,” said the governor.Since Rossello returned from a European vacation two weeks ago -- only to be met by demonstrators at San Juan’s airport -- he has moved continuously, staying some nights at the tony beach community of Dorado, just west of San Juan, according to reports in the newspaper El Vocero.As protests continued to grow, Rossello, 40, tried to calm the situation Sunday by pledging in an address streamed on the Internet not to run for re-election and stepping down as president of the PNP. When Rossello later met with party officials in the wealthy San Juan suburb of Guaynabo, the building was quickly surrounded by protesters who were dispersed only by police firing tear gas.Rossello’s speech “made things worse for him,” said Juan Angel Giusti-Cordero, a history professor at the University of Puerto Rico. “That was the announcement he should have made last week. He seems to be living in a bubble and getting terrible advice.”\--With assistance from Michelle Kaske.To contact the reporters on this story: Michael Deibert in San Juan at mdeibert@bloomberg.net;Ezra Fieser in Bogota at efieser@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Stephen Merelman at smerelman@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth CampbellFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Police fire tear gas at protesters calling for PR governor to resign
    New York Post

    Police fire tear gas at protesters calling for PR governor to resign

    Police clad in riot gear fired tear-gas canisters at protesters who marched through the streets of Puerto Rico's capitol city Monday night, demanding the island's governor step down. Videos captured in San Juan show police firing the tear gas at the protesters, who then dispersed and ran off in all directions. The crowd of demonstrators, many waving Puerto Rican flags, largely dissipated after police formed a line and fired the canisters at them, according to Fox News reporter Jeff Paul. The scuffle between the police and the demonstrators comes after massive crowds flooded the city streets during the day, calling for Gov. Ricardo Rosselló to resign amid a scandal triggered by the leak of offensive chat messages between him and advisers.