Nature

Consistently stunning documentaries transport viewers to far-flung locations ranging from the torrid African plains to the chilly splendors of icy Antarctica. The show's primary focus is on animals and ecosystems around the world. A comic book based on the show, meant to be used an as educational tool for kids, was briefly distributed to museums and schools at no cost in the mid-2000s.
Keep up with the elements: animals, earth, air, fire, water and more.
  • Spider swarm cloaks Greek lake in 1,000-metre web
    AFP

    Spider swarm cloaks Greek lake in 1,000-metre web

    Lake Vistonida in northern Greece has become an arachnophobe's worst nightmare after it was cloaked recently by massive webs spun by hundreds of thousands of small spiders. "It's caused by an overpopulation of spiders...there is an abundance of food available," local environmental park biologist Euterpe Patetsini told Alpha TV. Draped over roadside bushes, fences and small trees, the webs have a combined length of about 1,000 metres (1,100 yards).

  • Get ready for winter warn forecasters, as the mild spell finally comes to an end
    Yahoo News UK

    Get ready for winter warn forecasters, as the mild spell finally comes to an end

    Met Office forecasters have warned that wintry weather is on the way for the UK - ending the recent mild spell

  • Shocking footage shows elephants charge at hunters after one of them is shot ‘between the eyes’
    Yahoo News UK

    Shocking footage shows elephants charge at hunters after one of them is shot ‘between the eyes’

    The men shot at elephants in the Nakabolelwa Conservancy, in North-eastern Namibia’s Zambezi region.

  • Reuters

    U.S. greenhouse emissions fell in 2017 as coal plants shut

    Greenhouse gases emissions from the largest U.S. industrial plants fell 2.7 percent in 2017, the Trump administration said, as coal plants shut and as that industry competes with cheap natural gas and solar and wind power that emit less pollution. The drop was steeper than in 2016 when emissions fell 2 percent, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said. EPA acting administrator Andrew Wheeler said the data proves that federal regulations are not necessary to drive carbon dioxide reductions.

  • Humans are killing off one of the world’s largest living things
    Yahoo News UK

    Humans are killing off one of the world’s largest living things

    It's been getting worse for 30 or 40 years

  • Plastic piling up in Japan after China waste ban: survey
    AFP

    Plastic piling up in Japan after China waste ban: survey

    Japan said Thursday it was facing a growing sea of plastic waste with limited capacity to process it after China stopped accepting foreign waste imports. The environment ministry said about a quarter of major regional and municipal governments surveyed reported seeing accumulating plastic waste, sometimes going beyond sanitary standards. The costs of processing waste plastic were rising, according to more than 100 local governments and 175 waste processing firms that responded to a ministry survey.

  • Ocean plastic now polluting shipwrecks and desecrating war graves of servicemen lost at sea, warn divers
    The Telegraph

    Ocean plastic now polluting shipwrecks and desecrating war graves of servicemen lost at sea, warn divers

    Plastic pollution is now choking up historical shipwrecks and desecrating the war graves of servicemen lost at sea, divers have warned. Specialists from the Marine Archaeology Sea Trust (MAST) are currently carrying out ongoing excavations and recover from the wreck of HMS Invincible, which sank in the English Channel in 1758. But marine archaeologist Kevin Stratford said the team were forced to pick through piles of rubbish accumulating on the stricken ship, and warned that dozens of wrecks were now littered with refuse, including those still containing the bodies of fallen sailors. “Shipwrecks in the English Channel have every kind of human waste,” he said. “Until the early 90s you could drop anything you wanted to in the sea and so, over the years, the rubbish just built up. “Shipwrecks act like a reef, trapping the rubbish and acting as an accumulation point for plastics, cans, clothing, paints, glue, carpets, fishing gear. You name it, it’s down there. “The majority of shipwrecks don’t have human remains, but in the wrecks of World War One and Two ships bodies ended up sealed inside so you will have rubbish accumulating there too. “You wouldn’t go to a graveyard and dump rubbish there or Stonehenge but nobody can see the impact underwater.” A diver surveys the wreck of HMS Invincible  Credit: Kevin Stratford HMS Invincible, which was launched in 1744, sank when its when its rudder jammed and it ran aground on a sandbank between Langstone Harbour and the Isle of Wight. It capsized three days later but all the crew escaped before it went under. Mr Stratford said since the site was last dived on in the 1980s, it had filled up with decades of plastic waste. And he warned the floating refuse could prevent wildlife from colonising wrecks, which have become a haven for many species. "Shipwrecks themselves are a form of pollution - they aren't meant to be there, but they do act as a haven for fish and wildlife," he added. "But material slowly breaks down in the wrecks and likely pollutes much of the marine life inhabiting them. "The diving community has long been involved in cleaning up our oceans as we are the people who get to see the high level of pollutants first hand." Go plastic-free | Eight easy ways to reduce use According to Greenpeace an estimated 12 million tonnes of plastic is entering our the world’s seas every year, a truckload every minute and left unchecked, plastic will outweigh fish by 2050. Around 80 per cent of marine plastic waste was originally lost or discarded on land before washing out to sea, where it breaks down into microplastics which are mistaken for plankton by fish, seabirds and mammals. A recent study estimated that nine in 10 of the world’s seabirds have pieces of plastic in their guts and it has been shown that the average seafood eating European ingests 11,000 pieces of microplastic every year.

  • 'N' shaped beech tree created to woo a woman called Nellie is crowned England’s Tree of the Year
    Yahoo News UK

    'N' shaped beech tree created to woo a woman called Nellie is crowned England’s Tree of the Year

    Nellie’s Tree at Aberford near Leeds was formed almost 100 years ago.

  • 'Bad news': CO2 emissions to rise in 2018, says IEA chief
    AFP

    'Bad news': CO2 emissions to rise in 2018, says IEA chief

    Energy sector carbon emissions will rise in 2018 after hitting record levels the year before, dimming prospects for meeting Paris climate treaty goals, the head of the International Energy Agency (IEA) said Wednesday. The energy sector accounts for 80 percent of global CO2 emissions, with most of the rest caused by deforestation and agriculture, so its performance is key to efforts to rein in rising world temperatures. "I'm sorry, I have very bad news for you," IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol told guests at a diplomatic function hosted by the Polish embassy in Paris.

  • Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita porpoises
    AFP

    Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita porpoises

    The near-extinct vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise, has not yet disappeared from its habitat off the coast of Mexico, a research team said Wednesday after spotting six of them. The vaquita has been nearly wiped out by illegal fishing in its native habitat, the Gulf of California, and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned in May that it could go extinct this year. The team emphasized that the study was not a full population estimate, which they will present in January after further research.

  • Conservationists ask court to step in as red wolf plan looms
    Associated Press

    Conservationists ask court to step in as red wolf plan looms

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Conservationists told a federal judge Wednesday that an imminent government plan to shrink the territory of the only red wolves living in the wild would hasten the animal's extinction in violation of federal law.