Millennials

  • Why Millennials Waste So Much Money on Food
    The Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles

    Why Millennials Waste So Much Money on Food

    “When Leslie Hacker began taking a closer look at her finances recently, she noticed she was spending about $1,000 on food each month. “It seems like a lot, but when I did the math, that's about 35 dollars a day, which doesn't seem that crazy anymore to be honest,” she says. Eating out, ordering in. Throw in a bagel here, a coffee there, and it all adds up. “It's definitely a challenge for people my age to save on food.” At 28, Hacker is a millennial, defined as anyone born between 1980 and 2000. Saving money is a problem for her generation and experts say a big reason is how much millennials spend on eating out and ordering in. Hacker works in social media marketing, which makes it even harder,

  • Afterpay shows Millennials the new force in markets
    Australian Financial Review

    Afterpay shows Millennials the new force in markets

    In Australia the average age of an Afterpay user has increased overtime because the younger generation has educated others about the product. The financial power of Millennials and their potential to influence the governance of multinational corporations was brought home this week by Larry Fink, the chairman and CEO of BlackRock, the world's largest investment manager with $US6.28 trillion ($8.7 trillion) in assets under management. In his annual letter to the CEOs of the world's largest companies, Fink said Millennials would put pressure on boards of directors and managers to ensure companies "fulfill their purpose and responsibilities to stakeholders". He says Millennials, who represent 35

  • ACCESSWIRE

    National Survey Tests Millennials on Their Environmental Toxin I.Q.

    ANN ARBOR, MI / ACCESSWIRE / January 17, 2019 / In a recent national survey, most Millennials (approximately 9 in 10) acknowledged concern for their environmental chemical exposure, yet a significant number cannot identify toxin sources, nor are they trying to reduce their risks. The survey, conducted by consumer insights and messaging consultancy Engagious, measured the level of understanding and attitudes toward environmental chemical exposures by people ranging in age from 18 to 38, across four U.S. regions. ''The study indicated that most Millennials acknowledge daily exposure to environmental chemicals and concern about the harm those chemicals can do,'' said Gina Derickson, Director of Research for Engagious and lead researcher on this study.

  • 10 things millennials may or may not have killed
    Chicago Tribune

    10 things millennials may or may not have killed

    Millennials are called a lot of things — lazy, attention-seeking, entitled, etc. But murderous? The internet, in all its glory, is home to countless articles about the age-old products, businesses and traditions millennials have sent to the gallows. Canned tuna? Gone. The mayonnaise you mix with it? Gone. Hooters? Say it isn't so! We investigated some of the more prevalent claims to see which have merit and which don't.

  • Seventeen

    How Gen Z and Millennials Are Totally Different

    Which generation do you identify with?

  • Do you know what these 10 car dashboard symbols mean?
    USA TODAY

    Do you know what these 10 car dashboard symbols mean?

    These car dashboard symbols, often called "idiot lights," are supposed to be easy to understand. But for many drivers, it's just not that easy.

  • Business Standard India

    Most millennials unhappy with Trump: Survey

    Over 60 per cent of millennials in the US are unhappy with President Donald Trump, and only 37 per cent view him favourably, a new survey has revealed. Conducted by the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, the survey looked at opinions of 1,000 Americans aged 18 to 37. Trump's performance was rated on key issues like gun control, immigration policies and possible 2020 presidential candidates. Nearly 70 per cent do not approve of Trump's behaviour on Twitter saying that he tweets too much. "Republican millennials like Trump and like the job he's doing as president, but two-fifth of them want the president to tweet less," said John Cluverius, Assistant Professor at the varsity.. "It goes to show

  • PR Newswire

    New Study: 84% of Millennials Believe Homeownership Is Still Part of the American Dream, But There Are Hurdles to Overcome

    A new survey from Clever Real Estate reveals a full profile of the Millennial home buyer, uncovering insights from how they find homes to what they want to buy. - Millennials are thinking long term about where they buy: They value safe neighborhoods and good school districts over walkability and short commutes. - Millennials are 52% more likely to buy a multi-family property compared to older generations (Generation X and Baby Boomers).

  • Millennials Stare Into the Void, and Gillette Stares Back
    The Atlantic Wire (RSS)

    Millennials Stare Into the Void, and Gillette Stares Back

    On Monday, the men’s shaving brand Gillette released a new commercial and social-responsibility initiative, and the internet had some feedback. It features fictionalized scenes and clips from the news or viral videos. The campaign itself isn’t new—a related ad featuring the disabled NFL player Shaquem Griffin has been on the air for much of football season—but the debut of this new chapter sparked outrage among many conservatives online, who characterized the criticisms of masculine socialization as another round in what they see as a prolonged cultural attack on American men.

  • Millennials Have Their Own Unique Way to Avoid Divorce
    ALM Media

    Millennials Have Their Own Unique Way to Avoid Divorce

    There’s been a dramatic drop in divorce rates for the country’s youngest adults since 2008.

  • Millennials living with their parents are more likely to be unhappy
    Daily Mail

    Millennials living with their parents are more likely to be unhappy

    Nearly a third of Millennials live with their parents – but those who live alone or with roommates are happier about their housing circumstances, more financially independent and have more savings, according to a new survey. More than 22 percent of those Millennials are unhappy with their living situation, while 28 percent of are 'very' or 'extremely' satisfied to be living with their parents, according to a new survey of 1,095 people by Comet, a student loan website. 'While Millennials have gotten this bad reputation of living with their parents and being deadbeats, I think the data shows a little bit of a different story,' said Comet project manager Claire Cole. Cole told DailyMail.com that Millennials are facing unique challenges - including sky-high college costs, and those factors sometimes force them to make 'trade-offs' when it comes to their living situation.

  • Consumerism in crisis as millennials stay away from shops
    The Conversation

    Consumerism in crisis as millennials stay away from shops

    Forget Brexit or online competition. Millennials are just not consuming with the same fervour as their mums and dads.

  • Media and entertainment companies must look beyond Gen Z to compete amid shifting customer demographics
    PR Newswire

    Media and entertainment companies must look beyond Gen Z to compete amid shifting customer demographics

    LONDON, Jan. 16, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Media and entertainment companies must adopt a multigeneration strategy and challenge perceptions around the behaviors of older generations, or risk conceding huge growth potential. This is according to EY study, Ten opportunities and threats for media and entertainment companies | 2019, which shortlists the most pertinent risks and opportunities facing the industry in the next 12 months. EY research1 indicates that boomers are more loyal than younger generations, and with people aged 65 and older set to exceed the number of children under the age of five by 20202, this demographic offers an emerging growth opportunity.