Family focus

Focus on the Family (FOTF or FotF) is an American Christian conservative organization founded in 1977 in Southern California by psychologist James Dobson, based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. It is active in promoting an interdenominational effort toward its socially conservative views on public policy. Focus on the Family is one of a number of evangelical parachurch organizations that rose to prominence in the 1980s.
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  • Mother wonders why son's girlfriend stays away
    Detroit Free Press

    Mother wonders why son's girlfriend stays away

    Dear Amy: My son has dated the same girl for four years. She is white, while we are black. I am not prejudiced at all. I have invited her to our home many times. She has only come to our house once. My house is not dirty or messy. She just never comes to our home – he always goes to her house. I am single, and raised my son and his brother alone. I don't drink or smoke, and I really don't understand why she doesn't care for me (I don't feel like she does). My son makes up excuses for why she doesn't come to our home. I've stopped asking, but it really hurts my feelings! What can I do? – So Sad Mother Dear Mother: Your son and his girlfriend might spend more time at her house because they have

  • When opioids impact the whole family
    CBS News

    When opioids impact the whole family

    Ann Sinsheimer's meditation cushion doesn't get much use these days. It's crammed under a desk. Instead, in the extra room where she used to begin her mornings with a clear mind and focused breathing, a heart-eyed emoji pillow sits on the bottom level of a bunk bed, under the watchful eye of a Shawn Mendes poster.    After all, there's not much space — or time — for contemplation with two young girls in the house: Sinsheimer, 55, and her husband Marvin Sirbu, 73, are now raising two granddaughters because his daughter has an opioid addiction.   "What was a big, kind of empty house is now just packed," Ms. Sinsheimer said recently, her warm voice lacking any expected exasperation. "And we had

  • Kanye West Carries Kim Kardashian to the Car After Romantic Outing to 2 Chainz's Wedding
    Entertainment Tonight

    Kanye West Carries Kim Kardashian to the Car After Romantic Outing to 2 Chainz's Wedding

    Kanye West and wife Kim Kardashian were certainly in a touchy-feely mood after attending their pal 2 Chainz's wedding to Kesha Ward.

  • David Foster's daughter Sara says her friends 'always wanted to date' her dad
    Fox News

    David Foster's daughter Sara says her friends 'always wanted to date' her dad

    David Foster's daughter Sara said her father's “essence and aura” has always attracted women, even her friends. Sara Foster, 30, told Us Weekly that her 68-year-old father is “like forever young.” “His essence and his aura is that of like a 40-year-old,” Foster said about her father. “My 30-year-old friends have always wanted to date him. Always!” Foster also spoke about her father's engagement to singer Katharine McPhee, who is 34 years younger than David Foster. The couple announced in early July they got engaged during their romantic trip to Italy. The news caused such a stir that McPhee, 34, defended her engagement on social media. Sara Foster also hit back at critics on Saturday and said

  • Couples are more likely to divorce amicably if they're worth $5 million or more, says a divorce attorney
    Business Insider

    Couples are more likely to divorce amicably if they're worth $5 million or more, says a divorce attorney

    Rich American couples who have about $5 million are more likely to have an amicable divorce, says one divorce lawyer. This insight comes from writer Lauren Vinopal's exploration on Fatherly of why the upper middle class — dubbed "the fighting class" — fights the most about money. Couples fighting about money is nothing new.

  • Not all unkindness is bullying. Here's why we need to teach kids to differentiate.
    Chicago Tribune

    Not all unkindness is bullying. Here's why we need to teach kids to differentiate.

    In my work as a teacher I've noticed in recent years that parents frequently default to the term "bullying" to describe a lot of undesirable interactions their children have with peers. Bullying is tragically real, with devastating consequences in both the short- and long-term. Stopbullying.gov defines bullying as "unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children." According to the site, it must include an imbalance of power (whether it's strength, popularity, or access to information), and is a behavior that happens repeatedly or could be repeated. "Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally and excluding someone from a group on purpose," the site says.

  • I spent my savings on an 'elite' matchmaking agency – only to meet an array of mediocre men
    The Telegraph

    I spent my savings on an 'elite' matchmaking agency – only to meet an array of mediocre men

    Glass of wine in hand, the man sitting opposite me in the restaurant was in full flow. While he was droning on about his work commitments, I zoned in and out trying to work out how on earth I was going to get to through this first date. I had expected to meet an eligible bachelor, but he had turned out to be so boring that he made me want to stick asparagus up my nostrils. This memory came flooding back when I read about, Tereza Burki, a City financier who, last week, successfully sued a Knightsbridge-based elite matchmaking service, for the return of her £12,600 annual fee after they failed to find her the man of her dreams. A couple of years ago, I too joined an expensive matchmaking agency. I had just come out of a seven year relationship, and was on the wrong side of 50. I soon tired of online dating and receiving messages from over weight baldies who peppered their emails with childish emojis. I hankered to find Mr Right-for-me, a man who was suitably educated and a successful professional. And so this is how I found myself, throwing money (my entire savings to be precise) to an upmarket matchmaking agency in central London. The agency claimed to filter out the undesirables, the mediocre and give clients the personal touch, so I handed over the hefty sum of £6,000.  Tereza Burki, the City financier who successfully sued a Knightsbridge-based elite matchmaking service for the return of her £12,600 fee Credit:  Paul Keogh As I waited to be matched with someone from their ‘extensive database’, I idly imagined my handsome date, cashmere polo neck, a bit academic and kind. We’d eat steak tartare and swap notes on our latest clever box-set find and favourite novels. How could I have got it so wrong? The reality was an array of terrible matches, a growing sense of alarm and a flaming row in a flash restaurant in Chelsea. The first indication that all was not as I had expected came when I met personal matchmaker at a Park Lane hotel for ‘tea and an interview’. "I’m sitting in the corner of the drawing room, blonde, green dress, books on the table!!!" she pinged through on my iPhone. We chatted about holidays in southern Spain, men with bad haircuts and my ideal date. "So, are you a psychologist?" I asked, eager to press her on her method of assessment. "Oooh no, I’m just a people person. I love people," she trilled. I told her how I loved folk music, my favourite film was The Deer Hunter, and enjoyed weekends in the countryside. So far so banal. 'I paid £3,000 to a dating agency, but there weren't enough men' A few days later she emailed me with the details of W, "a successful entrepeneur who had travelled extensively and also liked folk music". When I met him at a pub in Richmond, I was shocked. I was expecting a cultured and dynamic man, instead I got a man in a pair of jeans, a moth eaten jumper and the table manners of a modern day Baldrick. And therein lies the rub. These agencies trade on their exclusivity, yet the men I met were far from the international super elite they promised. And the so called experts were a group of ex pr girls with swishy hair and ability to write up a nifty ‘press release’. The thing I found most unnerving though was not being allowed to see what my date looked like, let alone have a pre-date chat with them before we met. All so important if you are to get a feel of someone. It wasn’t too much of a surprise then that they rarely got it right. For the next few months, I dated up and down the eligibility scale. Some men were pleasant but dull, others who said they wanted to be in a relationship but were burdened with so much baggage they were toxic. I was expecting a cultured and dynamic man, instead I got a man with the table manners of a modern day Baldrick There was the 65 year-old American with a stunning property portfolio who broke the rules and googled me, only to inform me that I was too old for him. The funny looking barrister, who invited me to his St James’s club, and turned out to be prickly and aggressive, and a man who sold jumpers who took me to dinner in the Fulham told me I should have worn a clingier dress.  After he spent the entire meal chatting to a group of twentysomething blondes at the next table, I left in disgust. I was about to call it a day and demand my money back, when my matchmaker sent through the detail a publisher from Oxford. We met at a pub near his home. On date two, he said he said he really liked me and whisked me away to the Cotswolds. Not wanting to appear presumptuous he booked two rooms. I was quietly hopeful. Mulvey: 'my advice when it comes to dating is: trust your instinct and meet through friends of friends' Credit:  Getty Images Contributor But very quickly the debonair man who had seemed laid-back in London had morphed into a raging chauvinist in the countryside. When I started to chat to waiter in Italian, it became clear that my date was not happy. He muttered something under his breath and rolled his eyes like a stroppy teenager. "I WAS WONDERING when you were going to let me join your conversation," he boomed. I tried to laugh it off but clocked this was a man with a fragile ego. It is a tough time for midlife dating today, and there are a lot vulnerable educated women like me who are so desperate for love they are willing to try anything whatever the price. Yet, the quality of men were, I no different to those on online dating sites. I learnt the hard way, but my advice when it comes to dating is: trust your instinct and meet through friends of friends. It is bound to be more accurate. Oh, and it is free. Newsletter promo - Stella - End of article

  • Soaps Spoiler Digest: Wedding Chaos and Revenge
    soaps.sheknows.com

    Soaps Spoiler Digest: Wedding Chaos and Revenge

    Undesirable guests and unforgivable failures. Soaps.com brings you the latest tantalizing spoilers for The Bold and the Beautiful, Days of our Lives, General Hospital, and The Young and the Restless. Hope's wedding to Liam brings the Logan clan back together, but is she going to get the happy day she wants? Complicating matters, Taylor uses all her psychological powers to try to convince Liam that marrying Hope would be a serious mistake. Having already made some serious mistakes, Bill finds himself banned from the wedding and admitting his faults to Justin. But if Bill doesn't manage to throw his shadow on the ceremony, someone else will. Taylor drops by the wedding reception and gets in a fight

  • Princess Eugenie's £2m wedding bill should be paid by her father, Labour MP demands
    The Independent

    Princess Eugenie's £2m wedding bill should be paid by her father, Labour MP demands

    Princess Eugenie’s reported £2m wedding bill – which is being footed by taxpayers – should be paid by her father, a Labour MP has said. Chris Williamson has demanded the “fabulously wealthy” Prince Andrew, Duke of York, stump up for the mammoth chit – which has been heavily criticised. Princess Eugenie is ninth in line to the throne and carries out no royal duties.

  • ASK AMY: Overindulged daughters suffer from affluenza
    Toronto Sun

    ASK AMY: Overindulged daughters suffer from affluenza

    Dear Amy: I am in a relationship with a man who has two daughters, ages 9 and 10. At the end of his marriage, he and his wife filed for bankruptcy, partly due to her shopping addiction. Her spending doesn't appear to have changed, and I'm worried about how it's affecting her children, now and in the future. She immediately buys them everything they want to the point where there's really nothing to purchase for birthdays or Christmas, because they want for nothing. She buys them more clothes than any child could ever wear before they outgrow them. Recently she started giving them an unearned allowance of $20 a week, but she doesn't actually “give” them the money. She instead takes them shopping

  • Long-distance girlfriend jealous of boyfriend's friendship with co-worker
    Detroit Free Press

    Long-distance girlfriend jealous of boyfriend's friendship with co-worker

    Dear Carolyn: My girlfriend is jealous of one of my co-workers. This co-worker is sweet (she's married) and we share the same interest in food so we're constantly eating together – lunches, snacks, and occasionally happy hour or dinner. My relationship is long-distance and when I bring up any plans I may have with my co-worker, my girlfriend doesn't hold back the snide remarks. I've told her it's not that deep, but she'll pick it back up again the next time it comes up. Recently my co-worker and I went to happy hour after work and I lied and told my girlfriend I was going out with someone else, just to avoid any tension. I feel like I just went down a slippery slope because now I make something