Education

Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational.
  • 'I've been a hostage for nine years': Fired teacher wins battle with D.C. schools
    Washington Post

    'I've been a hostage for nine years': Fired teacher wins battle with D.C. schools

    For nine years, Jeff Canady lived in a cash-strapped limbo. The D.C. Public Schools teacher was fired in 2009 after 18 years in city classrooms, the school system deeming him ineffective. Canady, 53, contested his dismissal, arguing that he was wrongly fired and that the city was punishing him for being a union activist and for publicly criticizing the school system. For nearly a decade, Canady, jobless and penniless, waited for a decision in his case — until now. Earlier this month, an arbitrator ruled in favor of the fired teacher, a decision that could entitle him to hundreds of thousands of dollars in back pay and the opportunity to be a District teacher again. The school system can appeal

  • India, which has long focused on student success, now offers 'happiness' classes
    San Francisco Chronicle

    India, which has long focused on student success, now offers 'happiness' classes

    NEW DELHI - After the summer break, Delhi's children returned to school this month and found a new class added to their schedules: happiness. It wasn't a welcome-back joke. In a country where top universities demand average test scores above 98 percent and where cheating on final high school exams is organized by a "mafia" that includes teachers and school officials, the Delhi government's initiative marks a shift of emphasis from student performance to well-being. "We have given best-of-the-best talent to the world," said Manish Sisodia, Delhi's education minister, to a stadium full of Delhi teachers attending the launch of the happiness curriculum. "We have given best-of-the-best professionals

  • Crackdown feared as Russian grad school faces govt penalty
    Fox News

    Crackdown feared as Russian grad school faces govt penalty

    next prev MOSCOW –  One of Russia's best-known graduate schools, created to avoid a brain drain among top academics in the newly open Russia of the 1990s, has lost its state accreditation, amid fears of a wider clampdown on educational institutions with strong Western connections. Russian government auditors last month revoked the accreditation of the Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences, the second case in a year that a private school which partners with a European university has been downgraded. "They are closing down independent intellectual centers," said Mikhail Gelfand, a biotechnology professor at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Known colloquially as Shaninka, after

  • School let stranger steal child from after-school program: lawsuit
    New York Post

    School let stranger steal child from after-school program: lawsuit

    A Brooklyn mom claims a city school let a stranger walk off with her kids. The scary episode happened at Brownsville's PS 189, Rhonda Williams Lee says in a Brooklyn Supreme Court lawsuit she filed last week. Her son and daughter, identified by the initials RL and TL, typically go to an after-school program. But on Feb. 7 Williams Lee told the school the kids would be taking the bus instead. But a worker let the kids leave with “an unknown adult male,” who led them by the hand towards his home, the mom charges in court papers. The kids finally fled his grasp. The city said it will review the case. A DOE spokeswoman said there are “protocols for proper dismissal of students.”

  • Chemours CEO Shares STEM Education Holds Key To Jobs Of The Future
    Forbes

    Chemours CEO Shares STEM Education Holds Key To Jobs Of The Future

    Lots of companies these days like to call themselves disruptors innovators. But U.S. companies on the whole are not innovating rapidly enough to confront the economic future taking shape. So why are American companies falling so dramatically short of this need? I sat down with Mark Vergnano, the President and CEO of The Chemours Company, to discuss this challenge and what his company is doing to try to meet it. Robert Reiss: So first off, why is STEM-based learning so important? Mark Vergnano: Since 2009 more than 800,000 net STEM jobs have been added to the U.S. economy—more than double the growth of non-STEM sectors. According to a recent study, 80 percent of the fastest-growing jobs will soon

  • Queen's to review theological college link
    BBC News

    Queen's to review theological college link

    Queen's University will conduct a "comprehensive" review of its relationship with Union Theological College, BBC News NI has learned. The college is run by the Presbyterian Church in Ireland (PCI), but delivers theology degrees to Queen's students. The PCI faced criticism after it decided anyone in a same-sex relationship could not be a full member of the church. The college said it would work closely with the university on its review. BBC News NI understands the review will be carried out by a panel which includes external experts. They will be expected to produce recommendations regarding the future of the collaborative relationship between Queen's and Union Theological College. Dual role "The

  • Questioning real-world learning at ultra-Orthodox schools
    The Pueblo Chieftain

    Questioning real-world learning at ultra-Orthodox schools

    NEW YORK (AP) — At the ultra-Orthodox Jewish schools Pesach Eisen attended in Brooklyn, most of the day was spent studying religious texts with classes taught in Yiddish. One class at the end of the day was spent on secular subjects including English and math, enough to be "able to go to the food stamps office and apply." "Everything was super basic. ... Nobody took it seriously, so even if you were a studious person you had no chance," said the now-32-year-old Eisen, who had to take remedial classes and study intensively on his own before he succeeded in graduating from college in 2016. Complaints that schools like Eisen's run by New York's strictly observant Hasidic Jews barely teach English,

  • Female Russian students march in Moscow's Red Square as they graduate
    Daily Mail

    Female Russian students march in Moscow's Red Square as they graduate

    Hundreds of students and cadets paraded in Moscow's Red Square and celebrated receiving their diplomas during a graduation ceremony. Female graduates of the higher educational institutions of the Russian Emergencies Ministry marched in the iconic plaza as part of their routine. Dressed to the nines in their graduation robes, the students were pictured going up one-by-one to receive their certificates.  More than 600 graduates took part in the solemn ceremony in the Russian capital.

  • Pain as parents pay millions for burnt schools
    Daily Nation

    Pain as parents pay millions for burnt schools

    Parents of students in schools that were affected by unrest this term are facing penalties running into millions of shillings for the destruction caused. Most of the students who have since reported back are being charged between Sh1,000 and Sh5,000 to reconstruct the destroyed facilities. And, as they report back, the students will have to make do with poor accommodation facilities as most schools have converted classrooms, and in some cases dining halls, into temporary dormitories. The schools are racing against time to reopen since the second term is set to end of August 3 and the institutions need the money to reconstruct new dormitories ahead of next term. BUILDING BURNED Parents of the

  • NY schools to educate American students about Sikhism: Report
    Business Standard India

    NY schools to educate American students about Sikhism: Report

    With over 70 per cent of Americans ignorant about Sikhism, schools in the US state of New York will now include lessons on the minority community in their curriculum to educate students about Sikh religion and its tradition, according to a media report. A non-profit Sikh organisation, the United Sikhs, in collaboration with New York City's Department of Education, have taken this initiative to educate American students about Sikhism, FOX5NY reported. They came together in Jamaica, Queens, to celebrate a new curriculum for fifth and sixth graders in all five boroughs, the report said. Pritpal Singh, the United Sikhs' senior policy advisor, said that 70 per cent of Americans his group surveyed

  • Generalizing For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too
    Education Week - Work in Progress

    Generalizing For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too

    Guest post by Dr. Douglas Green Recently, I met Chris Emdin at a conference where he was the keynote speaker. After his emotional performance that was very well received, we had a conversation and exchanged signed copies of our respective books. Unlike mine, his For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too was a New York Times bestseller. While his primary audience is the many white people who teach black kids in poor urban schools, I believe that the advice he gives can be generalized to just about any teaching/learning environment. The key idea is that if you teach students who come from a very different culture than you do, you have to make a serious effort to understand

  • Dept of Education to spend $2.5M per year on 'executive superintendents'
    New York Post

    Dept of Education to spend $2.5M per year on 'executive superintendents'

    The nine new “executive superintendents” that Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza is adding to the education bureaucracy will cost at least $2.5 million a year, officials say. Each extra edu-crat will get a salary of $190,000 and up. Fringe benefits add at least $82,000 apiece to the cost, according to the Independent Budget Office. Department of Education officials say the posts will streamline operations. “The new leadership team will have a direct, positive impact on schools, students and families,” said spokesman Will Mantell. Critics disagree. “It's not streamlined; it's padded,” said Eric Nadelstern, a former deputy schools chancellor under Mayor Mike Bloomberg. “If you asked schools to