American Civil Liberties Union

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a nonprofit organization whose stated mission is "to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States. " Officially nonpartisan, the organization has been supported and criticized by liberal and conservative organizations alike. The ACLU works through litigation and lobbying and it has over 1,200,000 members and an annual budget of over $100 million.
Get the latest news and discussion about the American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU
  • ACLU blasts Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith for 'public hanging' comment
    The Washingtion Times

    ACLU blasts Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith for 'public hanging' comment

    The Republican senator drew the ire of the ACLU when video leaked Sunday of Ms. Hyde-Smith speaking at a campaign stop on Nov. 2. “If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row,” she said, referring to a man sitting nearby.

  • ACLU settles lawsuit with Wentzville removal of activist who opposed 'In God We Trust' sign
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    ACLU settles lawsuit with Wentzville removal of activist who opposed 'In God We Trust' sign

    WENTZVILLE • The ACLU of Missouri said Wednesday it has settled a lawsuit against the city of Wentzville on behalf of a woman who said police forcibly removed her from a city council meeting for criticizing an “In God We Trust” insignia on the dais. “The right to disagree with public officials without fear of intimidation or retribution is one of the cornerstones of a healthy democracy,” Tony Rothert, ACLU of Missouri legal director, said in a news release. The ACLU sued the city in April on behalf of Maryland Heights resident Sally Hunt, an activist who spoke against the city's insignia at a Feb. 14 council meeting and was then escorted out by police.

  • CIA considered using 'truth serum' on terror suspects after 9/11 attacks, report reveals
    The Independent

    CIA considered using 'truth serum' on terror suspects after 9/11 attacks, report reveals

    CIA interrogators considered using so-called truth serum on captured terror suspects after the 9/11 attacks, according to a de-classified report. The agency spent months researching drugs - none of which have shown any clear scientific evidence of effectiveness - as an "benign alternative" to waterboarding in the hope of forcing detainees to give up details of Al Qaeda plots. Details of "Project Medication" are revealed in a report by the chief of medical services that was released to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) this week.

  • Mississippi Senator Who Joked About Being Invited to a 'Public Hanging' Was Asked About Her Comments by Reporters Multiple Times, and It Did Not Go Well
    Second Nexus

    Mississippi Senator Who Joked About Being Invited to a 'Public Hanging' Was Asked About Her Comments by Reporters Multiple Times, and It Did Not Go Well

    “Hyde-Smith should be ashamed of herself,” ACLU of Mississippi Executive Director Jennifer Riley Collins and ACLU Deputy Legal Director Jeff Robinson said in a joint statement on Tuesday. “The fact that she chooses to use such repugnant language despite the ugly history in her state,” the ACLU said, “speaks to her lack of concern and knowledge about the experience of people who don't look like her.” “To celebrate the chance to sit in the front row of a public hanging demonstrates a profound ignorance of the state's institutional legacy of racism,” the ACLU continued. “Sen. Hyde-Smith needs to be held accountable for her words.” A video surfaced over the weekend of Hyde-Smith joking that she would

  • US News & World Report

    Riverton Tables Intoxication Ordinance After ACLU Weighs In

    The Riverton City Council has delayed voting on an ordinance that would create a list of "habitually intoxicated persons" barred from purchasing alcohol in Riverton. The Ranger reports that the council last week delayed the proposal until the council's first meeting in December to give the city time to discuss concerns about the proposal raised by the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • WTHR Indianapolis

    Hearing in asylum law challenge set for next week

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge set a hearing for Monday to determine whether to temporarily halt the Trump administration's latest immigration policy change denying asylum to anyone caught crossing the border illegally. President Donald Trump issued a proclamation late last week. The regulations circumvent immigration law that states anyone who arrives to the U.S. can ask for asylum regardless of how they arrived. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a challenge in California arguing the rules were illegal. The lawsuit also asks that a judge put the changes on hold while the litigation progresses. The changes went into effect Saturday and apply to anyone at the U.S.-Mexico border. The

  • CIA doctors considered using 'truth serum' on terror suspects
    The Guardian

    CIA doctors considered using 'truth serum' on terror suspects

    The George Bush Center for Intelligence, the headquarters of the CIA, is seen in Langley, Virginia. CIA doctors considered using a “truth serum” on suspected terrorists in detention after waterboarding appeared to be ineffective and traumatic for US personnel who witnessed it, according to newly declassified documents. The proposal to use the drug in a programme codenamed “Project Medication” was revealed in a 90-page report by a senior CIA medical officer, which was released on a judge’s order to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), after a prolonged legal battle.

  • CIA considered using 'truth serum' on post-9/11 terror suspects
    Toronto Sun

    CIA considered using 'truth serum' on post-9/11 terror suspects

    Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The existence of the drug research program — dubbed “Project Medication” — is disclosed in a once-classified report that was provided to the American Civil Liberties Union under a judge's order and was released by the organization Tuesday. The 90-page CIA report, which was provided in advance to The Associated Press, is a window into the internal struggle that medical personnel working in the agency's detention and harsh interrogation program faced in reconciling their professional ethics with the chance to save lives by preventing future attacks.

  • 'Project Medication': CIA weighed using 'truth serum' drug on terror suspects after 9/11
    WKYC Cleveland

    'Project Medication': CIA weighed using 'truth serum' drug on terror suspects after 9/11

    WASHINGTON – Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The existence of the drug research program – dubbed “Project Medication” – is disclosed in a once-classified report that was provided to the American Civil Liberties Union under a judge's order and was released by the organization Tuesday. The 90-page CIA report, which was provided in advance