Science

  • Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee
    Mashable

    Massive wildfire near Los Angeles kills one person, forces thousands to flee

    What began as a brush fire last Friday rapidly morphed into a raging blaze over the weekend, burning more than 33,000 acres and destroying at least 18 homes in Los Angeles County. Only about 10 percent of the wildfire was contained by Sunday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department reported. “All the experience we’ve had with fires is out the window,” John Tripp, the county’s deputy fire chief, told the Associated Press.

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  • Associated Press

    Hollywood stars hold climate rally ahead of DNC

    More than 1,000 people joined Hollywood stars including Shailene Woodley, Susan Sarandon and Danny Glover in Philadelphia last night on the eve of the Democratic National Convention and vowed to keep fighting for climate and environmental justice issues, even though their preferred presidential candidate would not be driving the party's agenda. Sarandon, who like the other stars in attendance campaigned on behalf of Sen. Bernie Sanders, said the rally's turnout was proof that theirs was a movement and not a cult of personality as some critics alleged.

  • Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows
    LiveScience.com

    Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

    Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France. An avid mountaineer, he died on Feb. 17, 1934, when he was climbing alone near the village of Marche-les-Dames, southeast of Brussels.

  • Google, Twitter accused of censoring content about Clinton
    FOX News Videos

    Google, Twitter accused of censoring content about Clinton

    Tech companies allegedly suppressing information critical of the candidate

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  • People often defend an alleged rapist's character. Here's why you should doubt them
    Mashable

    People often defend an alleged rapist's character. Here's why you should doubt them

    This person vouches for the perpetrator, who in many high-profile cases is accused of sexual harassment, domestic violence or rape. Think, for instance, of Geraldo Rivera and Greta Van Susteren, two Fox News anchors among many who contradicted their former colleague Gretchen Carlson and eagerly defended their boss, Roger Ailes, against charges of sexual harassment in recent weeks. Or consider the friends and family who wrote dozens of letters attesting to the moral character of Brock Turner, a Stanford student found guilty of sexual assault.

  • Solar plane circles globe in first for clean energy
    Reuters

    Solar plane circles globe in first for clean energy

    By Stanley Carvalho ABU DHABI (Reuters) - A solar-powered aircraft successfully completed the first fuel-free flight around the world on Tuesday, returning to Abu Dhabi after an epic 16-month voyage that demonstrated the potential of renewable energy. The plane, Solar Impulse 2, touched down in the United Arab Emirates capital at 0005 GMT (0405 local time) on Tuesday. It first took off from Abu Dhabi on March 9, 2015, beginning a journey of about 40,000 km (24,500 miles) and nearly 500 hours of flying time.

  • Dutch men confirmed as world's tallest
    BBC News

    Dutch men confirmed as world's tallest

    When it comes to height, Dutch men and Latvian women tower over all other nationalities, a new study confirms. The average Dutchman is now 183cm (6ft) tall, while the average Latvian woman reaches 170cm (5ft 7in). The research, published in the journal eLife, has tracked growth trends in 187 countries since 1914. It finds Iranian men and South Korean women have had the biggest spurts, increasing their height by an average of more than 16cm (6in) and 20cm (8in). In the UK, the sexes have gone up virtually in parallel by about 11cm (4in). "Mr Average" in Britain is now 178cm (5ft 10in) tall; Ms Average stands at 164cm (5ft 5in). This contrasts for example with men and women in the US, where the

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  • Associated Press

    Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead world for people's height

    If you want to see a tall population of men, go to the Netherlands. National height averages are useful as an indicator of nutrition, health care, environment and general health that people have experienced from the womb through adolescence, said Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London, who led the research. The tallest men in the new analysis were Dutch, with an average height of about 6 feet (182.5 centimeters).

  • Sorry, Donald Trump, being 'first' in space doesn't matter anymore
    Mashable

    Sorry, Donald Trump, being 'first' in space doesn't matter anymore

    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump likes to say that he's going to make America's space program "first" again. The details of his plan to make that happen are pretty much non-existent and he hasn't actually explained why NASA isn't "first" these days.  But honestly, who cares.  The fact is, it shouldn't matter if America is "first" in space or not. In fact, a go-it-alone strategy on space exploration would be a huge mistake. SEE ALSO: At Republican convention, astronaut Eileen Collins will talk about 'making America first again' in space Talking about access to space as some kind of national rat race to the top is damaging for every nation hoping to extend its reach into the solar system

  • Get Used To These Extreme Summer Heat Waves
    The Huffington Post

    Get Used To These Extreme Summer Heat Waves

    Sweltering heat waves like the ones plaguing the Midwest and Northeast in recent days will become typical summer weather if climate change continues its course, scientists warn.  Temperatures have been in the mid-to-high 90s across the northeast since Thursday, plaguing the New York tri-state area, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, D.C. and beyond. They follow a heat wave that struck the Midwest late last week, slamming Chicago with temperatures in the high 90s that felt more like 105 degrees.  And this comes just a month after triple-digit temperatures scorched the Southwest, breaking temperature records across Arizona and killing four hikers. At this rate, some experts are already saying there’s

  • When the going gets tough. Why Get a Loan From Us?

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  • 3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together
    Digital Trends

    3D-printing project makes building lab equipment as easy as snapping Legos together

    Legos are one of the most versatile toys around because you can, with enough bricks and imagination, build anything you want. “[Right now,] if you want to do a lot of different things in science, you need a lot of different instruments,” William Grover, assistant pofessor of boengineering, tells Digital Trends. Researchers could use these blocks to build virtually any instrument they might need.

  • That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds
    LiveScience.com

    That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

    Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.

  • Russian adventurer battled freezing temperatures and crazy winds to break hot-air balloon world record
    Business Insider

    Russian adventurer battled freezing temperatures and crazy winds to break hot-air balloon world record

    Fedor Konyukhov, a 65-year-old Russian adventurer, set a new world record over the weekend, becoming the fastest person to ever circumnavigate the entire globe in a hot-air balloon. Konyukhov took off from Australia on July 12 in a $2 million balloon. Eleven days later, he emerged from the clouds, having traveled approximately 21,000 miles around the world. His 11-day journey beat the late Steve Fossett's previous world record by two days. During his trip, Konyukhov reportedly battled terrible Arctic winds and temperatures as cold as minus-65 degrees Fahrenheit. At one point, his heating system broke. According to The Guardian, his balloon occasionally soared as high as 32,000 feet. He rarely

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  • Mexico finds water tunnel under Pakal tomb in Palenque
    Associated Press

    Mexico finds water tunnel under Pakal tomb in Palenque

    Archaeologists at the Mayan ruin site of Palenque said Monday they have discovered an underground water tunnel built under the Temple of Inscriptions, which houses the tomb of an ancient ruler named Pakal. Archaeologist Arnoldo Gonzalez said researchers believe the tomb and pyramid were purposely built atop a spring between AD 683 and 702. The tunnel led water from under the funeral chamber out into the broad esplanade in front of the temple, thus giving Pakal's spirit a path to the underworld.

  • Reuters

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults -U.S. study

    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function.

  • This da Vinci Doodle Holds a Secret
    Popular Mechanics

    This da Vinci Doodle Holds a Secret

    When Leonardo da Vinci was doodling, he was figuring out some of the fundamental laws of physics. In a new paper, Professor Ian M. Hutchings of the University of Cambridge argues that a sketch from da Vinci's journals shows that the Renaissance-era polymath was already working out his own ideas about the concepts of friction years earlier than previously thought. Hutchings argues that the sketches, which had previously been seen as inconsequential, were the first known place that da Vinci began to work out his theory of friction (or "tribology").

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  • The Cheat Sheet

    7 Ways That 'Star Trek' Changed the World

    The idea that Star Trek has changed the world might sound as farfetched as some of the USS Enterprise’s spacefaring missions, but the truth is that the science fiction series has directly or indirectly impacted both our present and future. It seems like an absurd statement — when creator Gene Roddenberry was first kicking around the idea in 1964, he probably never imagined that Star Trek would still be around in 2016 with reboots in the pipeline. Here are seven ways that Star Trek changed the world. 1.

  • Mars rover gains control of rock blasting lasers
    The Christian Science Monitor

    Mars rover gains control of rock blasting lasers

    Look out, Mars: NASA's Curiosity rover can now fire its onboard laser all by itself. The car-size Curiosity rover recently began autonomously choosing some of the targets for its ChemCam instrument, which blasts Martian rocks or soil with a laser and analyzes the composition of the resulting vapor. Mission scientists here on Earth still select most ChemCam targets, after poring over images captured by the rover, NASA officials said. "This autonomy is particularly useful at times when getting the science team in the loop is difficult or impossible — in the middle of a long drive, perhaps, or when the schedules of Earth, Mars and spacecraft activities lead to delays in sharing information between the planets," robotics engineer Tara Estlin, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.

  • Manatees head to Caribbean in first ever repopulation scheme
    AFP

    Manatees head to Caribbean in first ever repopulation scheme

    Singapore's zoo said Monday it will send two manatees to Guadeloupe as part of the world's first repopulation programme for the animal, which became extinct on the French Caribbean island in the early 20th century. Males Kai, seven, and Junior, six, will be the first manatees -- which are also known as sea cows -- on the island since the species died out. Another 13 manatees of both genders from zoos around the world will follow the pair to the Grand Cul-de-Sac Marin, a 15,000 hectare (37,000 acre) protected bay, the Asian city-state's zoo operator said.

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  • Accesswire

    Thunder Energies Corporation Chief Scientist Honored at the University of La Rochelle, France

    TARPON SPRINGS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / July 25, 2016 / Thunder Energies Corporation (TNRG), announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions. Thunder Energies Corporation, a publicly traded company with OTC stock symbol TNRG, announces that its Chief Scientist, Dr. R. M. Santilli, has been honored with a Technical Achievement Award by the University of La Rochelle, France, under co-sponsorship by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the International Federation of Non-Linear Analysis, the International Federation of Information Processing, the American Institute of Physics, and other institutions.

  • LiveScience.com

    Bartender, Beware: Squeezing Limes Can Cause 'Margarita Burn'

    Just ask Justin Fehntrich, who developed second-degree burns on his hand after spending a sunny afternoon squeezing limes for margaritas last month. The "margarita burn" phenomenon, known as phytophotodermatitis, occurs when a person gets a compound called psoralen on his or her skin, said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Once activated, it makes the skin "exquisitely sensitive" to light, she told Live Science.

  • Travel-ready ‘Gastronaut’ ice cream bars don’t melt, so you can take them anywhere
    Digital Trends

    Travel-ready ‘Gastronaut’ ice cream bars don’t melt, so you can take them anywhere

    Let’s face it: most of us don’t have the mental and physical toughness to be astronauts. But you know what we can do to be like our spacefaring heroes? Eat ice cream like they do. That’s the concept of 34-year-old Rob Collington, founder of Gastronaut

  • "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    If you're over 40 years old and you own a home, you need to read this. (It's not what you think!)

  • Want to Save the Whales? Start Studying Krill
    Wired

    Want to Save the Whales? Start Studying Krill

    Scientists aboard the NOAA research vessel Fulmar study the marine heath of the waters off San Francisco by sampling water and krill–humpback and blue whales' favorite meal.

  • Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits
    Associated Press

    Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits

    "I am not surprised it's coming to an end without any answers," Tony Wong, a businessman in Kuala Lumpur, said Monday. The Boeing 777-200ER vanished on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014. Investigators believed it turned back west and then south before dropping into the Indian Ocean west of Australia, where the search has been concentrated. The Malaysian government has concluded that it was deliberately steered off course.

  • CNET

    Your next healthy superfood: cockroach milk?

    May I offer you a tall, cold glass of cockroach milk? Why are you running away? It's good for you! I promise! An international group of researchers discovered that milk-like protein crystals produced by Diploptera punctata cockroaches are an excellent source of calories and nutrition. That could be good news for scientists working out how to feed a hungry planet, but gross news for anybody who's squeamish about cockroaches. The bug's common name is the Pacific beetle cockroach, and it's the only one known to bear live young. The mother roach produces the protein crystals to feed the embryos in the brood sac. Just don't expect farmers to open up vast new cockroach ranches where cockroach-pokes