Science

  • SpaceX Unveils Plan for Manned Mars Mission
    Good Morning America

    SpaceX Unveils Plan for Manned Mars Mission

    Humans could set foot on Mars within the next 10 years -- at least if SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has his way. Building such a complex system will cost a lot of money -- so much that Musk hasn’t yet named a dollar figure.

  • Tough times for S.Africa's all-female anti-poaching unit
    AFP

    Tough times for S.Africa's all-female anti-poaching unit

    South Africa's all-female "Black Mambas" anti-poaching team had never lost a rhino since they were formed in 2013, but the killing of two animals earlier this month shattered their proud record. The two rhinos, one of which was pregnant, were shot dead and their horns hacked off by poachers on a full moon night, underlining the crisis that threatens the species. The Black Mambas are made up of 36 unarmed female rangers, aged from 19 to 33, based at the Balule Game Reserve in Limpopo province on the edge of Kruger National Park.

  • First-Ever Baby Born With Dna From 3 People
    Fox News

    First-Ever Baby Born With Dna From 3 People

    A controversial technique that uses DNA from three parents has resulted in the first-ever birth of a child, a team of American scientists in Mexico confirmed Tuesday. The technology allows parents with rare genetic mutations to have healthy babies and, while not approved in the United States, is legal in the United Kingdom. New Scientist reported that the baby, a boy, was born five months ago to Jordanian parents. The child was at risk of inheriting a severe neurological disorder called Leigh syndrome, which typically kills individuals within a few years of birth. In using DNA from three individuals, researchers were able to remove some of the mother’s DNA from an egg and leave out the disease-causing

  • Humans evolved to be a violent species
    International Business Times UK

    Humans evolved to be a violent species

    The roots of lethal violence between humans can be found in their evolutionary tree, researchers have said. Violent behaviour directed towards members of the same species has been documented in other primates, and may have been inherited by humans throughout their evolution. The consequences of such behaviours can however be mitigated by society. The philosophical question about whether humans are inherently violent, or if murder, conflict and violence depend on cultural factors is an ancient debate. Already in the 18th century, French thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau argued that violence was shaped by our environment. Since then, social scientists have attempted to explain how human interpersonal

  • Reuters

    Europe's food safety watchdog says to release studies on weed-killer glyphosate

    By Kate Kelland and Alissa de Carbonnel LONDON/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Europe's food safety watchdog will release data from some of the scientific studies it reviewed in its assessment of glyphosate, an ingredient in Monsanto's widely used herbicide Roundup and subject of a fierce row over possible cancer risk. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) said on Thursday it had decided to release the raw data as part of its "commitment to open risk assessment". EFSA had received several requests for data in relation to its glyphosate assessment, including from members of the European parliament.

  • Scientists say your genetics play a huge part in deciding if your significant other is “the one”
    Hello Giggles

    Scientists say your genetics play a huge part in deciding if your significant other is “the one”

    It turns out, your attraction to your partner is highly influenced by their genes (and how they mesh with yours). Basically, all humans share an important element of their immune system called HLA (which stands for human leukocyte antigens). The scientists studied 254 heterosexual couples by asking them a series of questions about their partner after determining their genetics. Over a period of nine months, they were able to determine not only these results, but also why they’re probably important in our evolution.

  • Cave fires and rhino skull used in Neanderthal burial rituals
    New Scientist

    Cave fires and rhino skull used in Neanderthal burial rituals

    BURNING through the darkness, the fires would have lit up the cave around where the young child lay. The remains of a series of small fires discovered within a dolomite hillside 93 kilometres north of Madrid, Spain, could be the first firm evidence that Neanderthals held funerals. The blackened hearths surround a spot where the jaw and six teeth of a Neanderthal toddler were found in the stony sediment. Puzzlingly, within each of these hearths was the horn or antler of a herbivore, apparently carefully placed there. In total, there were 30 horns from aurochs and bison as well as red deer antlers, and a rhino skull nearby. Advertisement Archaeologists believe the fires may have been lit as some

  • The Land Rover Discovery arrives in record-breaking form
    AFP Relax News

    The Land Rover Discovery arrives in record-breaking form

    Land Rover knows how to build up to a new model reveal. While other companies are content with video teasers or social media campaigns, the British SUV brand can always be counted on to go above and beyond. The bricks, a record 5,805,846 to be precise, were needed to build a 13-meter-high replica of London's iconic Bridge, in and around which the new Discovery made its entrance.

  • Early bloomer: Demonstration shows flower that can shape-shift on demand
    Digital Trends

    Early bloomer: Demonstration shows flower that can shape-shift on demand

    Scientists coming up with shape-shifting materials is cool, but you know what’s even cooler? Materials that shape-shift on demand. That’s what a team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Akron describe

  • How Long Will It Take SpaceX to Return to Space? -- The Motley Fool
    The Motley Fool

    How Long Will It Take SpaceX to Return to Space? -- The Motley Fool

    For SpaceX, it's back to square one -- or more precisely, square zero. A little over three weeks ago, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket undergoing pre-launch testing at Cape Canaveral exploded on its launch pad. Along with the rocket, and an on-board Israeli satellite, the explosion sent SpaceX's year-long streak of successful launches up in smoke, resetting it to zero. Now the question is: How long will it take SpaceX to return to space? How long to get back to square one? A competitor chimes in Last week, a controversial headline from Reuters implied that United Launch Alliance (ULA) CEO Tory Bruno had predicted SpaceX would be out of commission for between nine and 12 months. Such an apparent assertion

  • Dead whales beached in Chile, climate change suspected
    AFP

    Dead whales beached in Chile, climate change suspected

    Several huge whales have washed up dead over recent months on beaches in northern Chile, where scientists suspect they are moving in increasing numbers due to climate change. After the beaching of hundreds of dead whales in the south last year, the trend has now shifted to areas where the phenomenon was previously rare. "We have detected a rise in recorded cases of beached whales on the coast, which is not normal," Sernapesca biologist Gerardo Cerda told AFP on Wednesday.

  • Reuters

    Scientists fix fractures with 3D-printed synthetic bone

    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. Unlike real bone grafts, the synthetic material - called hyper-elastic bone - is able to regenerate bone without the need for added growth factors, is flexible and strong, and can be easily and rapidly deployed in the operating room. Giving details in a teleconference, the scientists said the results of their animal trials - published on Wednesday in the Science Translational Medicine journal - were "quite astounding".

  • As drought grips Iran, farmers lament loss of a way of life
    Los Angeles Times

    As drought grips Iran, farmers lament loss of a way of life

    Watermelons once sprung from this soil, the giant striped fruit dotting the arid landscape like mushrooms after a rain. “It was such a garden,” farmer Hossain Mirakhouri, 45, recalled of his childhood on this sun-scorched plateau east of Tehran. Now nothing remains of his family’s patch of watermelon, a water-hungry crop that Mirakhouri can no longer afford to grow in increasingly dry conditions. He and his brothers, who farm a 2-acre homestead by hand much as their ancestors did, have switched to growing barley and genetically modified cotton, which they say have lower water requirements.  “The amount of land that is cultivable shrinks year in, year out,” said Mirakhouri, sweat beading on his

  • Was Civilization the Cure for Primordial Human Violence?
    Scientific American Blog Network

    Was Civilization the Cure for Primordial Human Violence?

    Hobbes is hot. The 17th-century British philosopher argued that before civilization, our ancestors were mired in a “war of all against all.” Only the emergence of powerful governments, “Leviathans,” Hobbes called them, curbed our violent tendencies. Many influential modern scholars espouse versions of this Hobbesian view. They include Richard Wrangham, Jared Diamond, Edward Wilson, Azar Gat, Steven LeBlanc, Lawrence Keeley and Steven Pinker. In his 2011 bestseller The Better Angels of Our Nature, Pinker asserts that even the most war-torn modern states are “far less violent than traditional bands and tribes.” “Hobbes got it right,” Pinker declared in a 2007 essay. The Hobbesian view overlaps

  • Cosmos Magazine

    How to rejuvenate stale bread and crunchless crisps

    It can be irritating when bread goes stale and chips lose their crunch if you leave them out too long. But instead of throwing them away, you can revive them to their former freshness in a matter of minutes. The video above by the American Chemical Society's Reactions team explains the chemistry behind the staling process. And as you may have guessed, it has a lot – but not all – to do with moisture. The starch in bread, for instance, is made up of two molecules: amylose and amylopectin. After baking bread, the tessellating structures of amylopectin traps moisture. But that structure breaks down slowly over time, releasing the moisture and hardening the bread. When chips are fried, on the other

  • IdeaFestival 2016: 5 ways to navigate uncertainty in the workplace and use it to enhance creativity
    TechRepublic

    IdeaFestival 2016: 5 ways to navigate uncertainty in the workplace and use it to enhance creativity

    Our human discomfort with uncertainty may impact hiring decisions and creativity in the workplace, according to Jamie Holmes, a future tense fellow at the New America think tank. Holmes spoke at IdeaFestival 2016 on Wednesday, when he explained that while we enjoy uncertainty during sporting events or while touring a new place, we don't like it at work, in healthcare, or in deciding whether or not to trust someone. "Uncertainty, whether good or bad, amplifies our emotions," Holmes said. "Our brains seek consistency." The following are the five consequences of uncertainty, according to psychologists: Assimilation: We extend a concept we already have about the way the world works. For example,

  • 2017 Land Rover Discovery Release Date, Price and Specs
    CNET

    2017 Land Rover Discovery Release Date, Price and Specs

    "Discovery" is one of the auto industry's all-time great names, a moniker incredibly well-suited to an SUV with a history of providing legitimatelegendary off-road chops. So it was quite a surprise when Land Rover walked away from the appellation in the mid-2000s in favor of an alphanumeric soup -- LR3 and then LR4, model names that that sounded they belonged to a line of icemakers. Well, the rebranding experts have evidently been put out to pasture in Great Britain, because Land Rover has finally, mercifully restored the Discovery nameplate for this fifth-generation model. And it's not just the name that's new, the Green Oval has reworked the seven-seat SUV from stem to stern for its Paris Motor

  • Inside the Apartment Where Garrett Phillips Was Found Dead
    ABC News Videos

    Inside the Apartment Where Garrett Phillips Was Found Dead

    Potsdam Police Chief Mark Murray takes us back to the scene of the crime to show Elizabeth Vargas how police think Garrett Phillips' killer escaped. Enter the apartment. Don't always. For Specter here the door was open is on responsive don't show floor

  • Everything You Need To Know About Friday's Rare Black Moon
    Refinery 29 UK

    Everything You Need To Know About Friday's Rare Black Moon

    For the second time this month, earthlings of the Western Hemisphere will experience a special event involving our moon. Earlier this month, we got our full moon — the Harvest Moon. Basically, a Black Moon is the exact opposite of a Blue Moon, the term used when you get two full moons in one month.

  • Taking the environmental bite out of salmon farming
    AFP

    Taking the environmental bite out of salmon farming

    In a peaceful bay off Norway's Hitra island, massive nets teem with salmon destined for dinner tables worldwide -- an export boon for the Nordic nation that comes with a long list of environmental side-effects.

  • The Atlantic Wire (RSS)

    A Fitbit for Your Placenta

    “It is described as the ‘afterbirth,’” said Catherine Spong, an obstetrician/gynecologist and the acting director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). To appreciate the placenta, you have to recognize that it’s responsible for sustaining a fetus as it grows into a baby, which is tethered by the umbilical cord to the placenta embedded in a pregnant woman’s uterine wall. Through this arrangement, the placenta provides nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, eliminates waste, regulates fetal temperature, produces hormones, and performs other crucial pregnancy tasks.

  • 14,000-year-old campsite in Argentina adds to an archaeological mystery
    Ars Technica

    14,000-year-old campsite in Argentina adds to an archaeological mystery

    For more than a decade, evidence has been piling up that humans colonized the Americas thousands of years before the Clovis people. The Clovis, who are the early ancestors of today's Native Americans, left abundant evidence of their lives behind in the form of tools and graves. But the mysterious pre-Clovis humans, who likely arrived 17,000 to 15,000 years ago, have left only a few dozen sources of evidence for their existence across the Americas, mostly at campsites where they processed animals during hunting trips. Now a fresh examination of one such campsite, a 14,000-year-old hunter's rest stop outside the city of Tres Arroyos in Argentina, has given us a new understanding of how the pre-Clovis

  • The Seattle Times

    Study may give new respect to our Milky Way neighborhood

    NEW YORK (AP) — Our corner of the Milky Way galaxy may be a bigger deal than scientists thought. The galaxy is shaped like a disk, with four major arms of stars, dust and gas spiraling out from the center. Our solar system lies at the edge of what’s called the Local Arm, which resembles a separate piece of an arm. Historically, the Local Arm “didn’t get much respect…. People thought it was just a tiny little thing,” says Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. But a new paper he co-authored concludes it is bigger than scientists thought. Researchers calculated that it stretches more than 20,000 light-years long, maybe about four times what scientists

  • Quartz has tested Google’s new AI-powered translator, and it needs to learn more Chinese
    Quartz

    Quartz has tested Google’s new AI-powered translator, and it needs to learn more Chinese

    Google has recently overhauled Google Translate. The new AI-powered translator, “Google Machine Neural Translation,” can cut down errors by 80% compared to its current algorithm, making it nearly identical to human translators, the company said this week. The new method is currently only available for English to Mandarin and vice-versa, but judging from the examples Google gave, it appears to be doing great at translating standard journalistic writing. Here at Quartz, where language is an obsession, we decided to take matters into our own hands. As we did with Skype’s instant translator, we put Google’s new translator through a realistic Chinese stress test. The highest score available is five

  • Let's fill a toilet with 240 pounds of mercury and then flush it
    CNET

    Let's fill a toilet with 240 pounds of mercury and then flush it

    Mercury, both beautiful and potentially dangerous, is a heavy metal that's liquid at normal ambient temperatures. It can be poisonous and should be treated with care. So what do you do with several large flasks of the shimmery stuff? You flush it down a toilet, of course. YouTube channel Cody's Lab filmed that exact experiment for us all to watch with wonder. Related stories Flush a functional solid-gold toilet at the Guggenheim Museum Iron Throne toilet lets you rule the bathroom The Cody's Lab video, posted on Tuesday, kicks off by discussing just how hard it is to flush a dense lead bullet down a toilet. You need a super-sucker of a loo to get the job done. The bullet test prompted Cody to