Science

  • Russia Emergency Teams Look for Debris of Crashed Spacecraft
    ABC News

    Russia Emergency Teams Look for Debris of Crashed Spacecraft

    Russian emergencies workers are combing the mountains near the border with Mongolia for the debris of a cargo spaceship that crashed minutes after its launch. The Emergencies Ministry's branch in the republic of Tuva said Friday it's using drones to search for fragments of the unmanned Progress MS-04 craft that crashed Thursday less than 7 minutes after its launch from Russia's space complex in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. There has been no indication of any damage in the sparsely populated area. The craft was carrying 2.5 metric tons of supplies to the International Space Station. Russian space officials haven't yet identified the reason for the crash, but believe it was caused by the failure of the

  • United Launch Alliance’s RocketBuilder Is the Best Online Configurator Yet
    The Drive

    United Launch Alliance’s RocketBuilder Is the Best Online Configurator Yet

    United Launch Alliance has launched (no pun intended) a new online configurator that lets you design and build the rocket of your dreams on your home computer. To be fair, ULA’s online configurator for its Atlas V rocket—which you can access here—is a little more complex than your average automaker’s build-your-own website.

  • The US Committee on Science, Space, and Technology doesn’t believe climate change is a problem
    Quartz

    The US Committee on Science, Space, and Technology doesn’t believe climate change is a problem

    The overwhelming science linking climate change to human activity was enough to convince world leaders to ratify the Paris Agreement earlier this year. Although the US is a party to this agreement, president-elect Donald Trump has threatened to pull out of it. And it’s going to be difficult to convince him otherwise when he’s surrounded by like-minded climate deniers. Even the US Committee on Science, Space, and Technology doesn’t think climate change is a real threat. Dec. 1, the congressional committee, chaired by republican representative Lamar Smith from Texas, tweeted out a link by Breitbart, a favorite news site of the Trump-supporting alt-right, calling the mainstream media “climate alarmists.”

  • Professor fatally stabbed on USC campus, student arrested
    Associated Press

    Professor fatally stabbed on USC campus, student arrested

    A graduate student arrested on suspicion of stabbing to death the professor who oversaw his work at the University of Southern California was being held on $1 million bail Saturday as their shocked colleagues began processing the news. David Jonathan Brown, a 28-year-old brain and cognitive science student, was arrested in the Friday afternoon attack in the heart of the Los Angeles campus. Brown was among just five students who worked in Tjan's lab that studied vision loss.

  • Popular Mechanics

    Buzz Aldrin Had To Be Evacuated From Antarctica

    Former American astronaut Buzz Aldrin, one of the first men to walk on the moon, has been evacuated by plane from the South Pole for medical reasons, officials said Thursday. Aldrin, 86, was visiting the South Pole as part of a private tourist group when his health deteriorated, the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators said on its website. It said he was taken as a precaution on the first available flight to McMurdo Station, a U.S. research center on the Antarctic coast.

  • Why Did Donald Trump Get Elected? Ask the Bees
    Wired News

    Why Did Donald Trump Get Elected? Ask the Bees

    What do Donald Trump and a bee hive have in common? While this might sound like the setup to a bad joke or bit of political punditry, it’s an important and meaningful academic question. To a collective behavior scientist, electing a president or choosing a new nest site are both choices that arise from the interactions of a large number of individuals. When bees need to find a new nest site, scouts will visit several potential locations. When they return, if they like the site they dance excitedly in a way that tells others where it is located. This dancing may recruit more scouts to check out the site, who likewise visit the site and start dancing to express support for the location. Bees will

  • Four new elements on the periodic table now have names
    CBS News

    Four new elements on the periodic table now have names

    It’s now time to say hello, officially, to the four new additions to the Periodic Table of Elements. This week, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) approved the names of the four new elements, whose existence was first confirmed to the public back in January.  The names for elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 are: Nihonium (Nh), Moscovium (Mc), Tennessine (Ts), and Oganesson (Og), respectively. The announcement comes after a five-month public review period of the element names, which were proposed by their discoverers, IUPAC said.  “Overall, it was a real pleasure to realize that so many people are interested in the naming of the new elements, including high school students,

  • NASA photo reveals a startling 300-foot-wide rift in Antarctic Ice Shelf
    Mashable

    NASA photo reveals a startling 300-foot-wide rift in Antarctic Ice Shelf

    The breakup of the massive Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica is getting closer and will eventually produce an iceberg the size of Delaware prowling the Southern Ocean, according to new NASA data.  On Friday, NASA released an astonishing new image taken

  • Accesswire

    ChroMedX Collaboration with Biointerface Institute Receives OCE Grant for HemoPalm Biosensor Development

    TORONTO, ON / ACCESSWIRE / December 2, 2016 / ChroMedX Corp. (CSE:CHX) (MNLIF) (FSE:EIY2) (the "Company"), developer of the HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer System, is pleased to announce that it's collaboration with Dr. Leyla Soleymani and the Biointerface Institute of McMaster University has received a Voucher for Innovation and Productivity I (VIP I) grant from Ontario Centres of Excellence (OCE) for continued HemoPalm biosensor development. The VIP I program helps eligible companies develop, implement and commercialize technical innovations by supporting partnerships between Ontario's industry and publicly funded post-secondary institutions. Projects funded through VIP I enable the development of new products and/or processes, facilitate productivity improvements, and help generate new revenues and high-value jobs for Ontario.

  • France detects H5N8 bird flu on duck farm
    Fox News

    France detects H5N8 bird flu on duck farm

    PARIS –  France has detected a case of the highly contagious H5N8 strain of bird flu on a duck farm in the southwest, the agriculture ministry said on Friday. The outbreak, which killed 2,000 out of a flock of 5,000 ducks on the farm in the Tarn region, follows a case of H5N8 confirmed among wild birds in northern France this week and is the latest of a series of outbreaks in Europe.

  • The Cheat Sheet

    7 Ways That 'Star Trek' Changed the World

    The idea that Star Trek has changed the world might sound as farfetched as some of the USS Enterprise’s spacefaring missions, but the truth is that the science fiction series has directly or indirectly impacted both our present and future. It seems like an absurd statement — when creator Gene Roddenberry was first kicking around the idea in 1964, he probably never imagined that Star Trek would still be around in 2016 with reboots in the pipeline. Here are seven ways that Star Trek changed the world. 1.

  • WTO seeks trade deal on 'green' products
    AFP

    WTO seeks trade deal on 'green' products

    The heavyweights of world trade, including the United States, China and Japan, meet in Geneva this weekend to establish a list of environmentally friendly products for which tariffs can be eliminated or reduced. The green products include solar panels, wind turbines and air quality monitors "that can help achieve environmental and climate protection goals," the World Trade Organization said. EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstroem is expected at the WTO talks on Saturday along with senior officials of 17 countries, including US Trade Representative Michael Froman.

  • NPR.org

    The Electric Blue Polar Cloud Season Came Early This Year

    Each year, a glowing mass of clouds forms over the South Pole, high in the atmosphere, trapped between Earth and space. From the ground they look wispy and shimmery, like a blue-white aurora borealis. From space, they look like an electric-blue gossamer haze. Scientists call them noctilucent, or night-shining, clouds, and this year the noctilucent cloud season came early to the Southern Hemisphere. In the decade since NASA launched a satellite that can take images of the ice crystals that make up such clouds, the clouds have usually started showing up over the South Pole in late November or early December. Composite satellite images posted on NASA's website today show Antarctica under noctilucent

  • Thomas Edison's lab door key, lightbulbs up for auction
    Associated Press

    Thomas Edison's lab door key, lightbulbs up for auction

    Thomas Edison's door key to the 19th century lab in New Jersey where he invented the phonograph goes up for auction this weekend, along with lightbulbs he perfected. Six keys in all from the famous inventor's Menlo Park home and work place will be auctioned Saturday in Dallas, along with five lightbulbs, including two that he created. The items were acquired by Charlie Knudsen, 69, of Pittsburgh and had belonged to his great-aunt.

  • Smart sensor can tell you exactly which devices are wasting power in your home
    Digital Trends

    Smart sensor can tell you exactly which devices are wasting power in your home

    Whether it’s for money-saving purposes or just good old-fashioned curiosity, it would be great to have a gadget able to tell us the precise amount of electricity that’s used by our everyday household appliances, light fixtures, and other devices. Well, thank your lucky stars for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Office of Naval Research, then, because researchers from both establishments have just designed such a portable, low-cost smart sensor. The portable sensor system is comprised of five postage stamp-sized sensors, which can be placed over the incoming power lines in a house.

  • Teen eco activist spurs hope at children's peace prize award
    AFP

    Teen eco activist spurs hope at children's peace prize award

    Award-winning teen environmental activist Kehkashan Basu said Friday ecologists should "not lose hope" in their battle to fight climate change, despite scepticism from world leaders including US President-elect Donald Trump. "These are uncertain times, but I want to tell people to continue their work and not bother about it," Basu, born in Dubai to Indian parents, told AFP in The Hague, where she was awarded the prestigious International Children's Peace Prize. World leaders, CEOs, negotiators and activists attending a UN conference earlier this month in Marrakesh voiced concern following the election of Trump, who has vowed to withdraw the US from a hard-won global agreement on climate change.

  • Type 1 diabetes: researchers pinpoint molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cells
    AFP Relax News

    Type 1 diabetes: researchers pinpoint molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cells

    A neurotransmitter by the name of GABA, known to reduce brain activity, could induce the regeneration of insulin-producing cells, researchers in France have found. The breakthrough, confirmed in mice and partially validated in humans, brings new hope to patients suffering from type 1 diabetes, explains the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherce médicale). This latest research, published in the journal Cell, could hold particular significance for patients suffering from type 1 diabetes.

  • What are the top 5 colleges for women studying STEM?
    USA TODAY College

    What are the top 5 colleges for women studying STEM?

    Editor’s Note: This article was originally published in USA Today College Guide. College Factual uses data from the Department of Education to rank these schools both on their overall quality when it comes to education and by how well the schools are doing in attracting and graduating women in STEM majors. Some of the quality factors that are taken into consideration are graduation rates, student loan default rates and average salaries of graduates. Additionally, to determine if each school was a good one for female STEM students, we also looked at the total number of female students and professors at the school as well as the growth in females who have graduated from STEM programs in the past eight years.

  • SpaceX will return to flight Dec. 16 with a satellite launch
    Newsweek

    SpaceX will return to flight Dec. 16 with a satellite launch

    This article originally appeared on the International Business Times. Three months removed from a disastrous and frightening explosion that left its next mission in doubt, SpaceX is scheduled to take flight on Dec. 16 while carrying new satellites for Iridium Communications Inc., Iridium said in a statement Thursday. While the Federal Aviation Administration must still approve the launch, Virginia-based Iridium said it expects to be SpaceXs “first return to flight launch customer.” "We're excited to launch the first batch of our new satellite constellation. We have remained confident in SpaceX's ability as a launch partner throughout the Falcon 9 investigation," Iridium CEO Matt Desch said. "We

  • This video of precipitation in slow motion is strangely captivating and impossible to stop watching
    Hello Giggles

    This video of precipitation in slow motion is strangely captivating and impossible to stop watching

    The classes of our youth could’ve definitely learned a lesson from some of the amazing visual breakdowns of scientific processes, like this slow-motion video of precipitation we spotted at Atlas Obscura. Seriously, we could’ve used material from the creators of this video and the NASA comic book about the water cycle when we were struggling to stay awake in class. Despite our overt bitterness, creative projects like this up close and personal look at precipitation have given us a new appreciation for science (which also won cool points for confirming that being hangry is our strongest motivating force).

  • Human ancestor "Lucy" was a tree climber, evidence suggests
    CBS News

    Human ancestor "Lucy" was a tree climber, evidence suggests

    She was discovered 42 years ago, but the 3-million-year-old human ancestor dubbed “Lucy” is still providing new insights on the human origin story. Now, new research suggests this predecessor to modern humans was an adept tree climber.  The evidence of Lucy’s tree-climbing habits was found in high-resolution CT scans of her fossilized bones, according to scientists from the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Texas at Austin. Those CT scans were intricately 3D printed, allowing for direct comparisons to the bones of early hominids, modern humans, and modern chimpanzees. The researchers’ work was published this week in the journal PLOS ONE.  Lucy’s arms were heavily toned, supporting

  • 1,000-Year-Old Viking Toolbox Found at Mysterious Danish Fortress
    LiveScience.com

    1,000-Year-Old Viking Toolbox Found at Mysterious Danish Fortress

    A Viking toolbox found in Denmark has been opened for the first time in 1,000 years, revealing an extraordinary set of iron hand tools that may have been used to make Viking ships and houses, according to archaeologists. The famed 10th-century Danish king Harald Bluetooth is thought to have ordered the construction of the fortress. So far, archaeologists have found at least 14 iron tools inside a single deposit of earth excavated from a gatehouse building of the fortress.

  • Strange-Looking Map Shows the Real Shape of the Suburbs
    Popular Mechanics

    Strange-Looking Map Shows the Real Shape of the Suburbs

    Maps don't just show you a picture of the land. They can give new ways of viewing the world. A perfect example is this new look at the megaregions of the United States out of the University of Sheffield and Darmouth. Looking at over four million commuter patterns gives a sense of how interconnected these regions are. Among the other things Garret Dash Nelson and Alasdair Rae were studying was if megaregions, and regionalization, even existed in the United States. "The detection of recognizable communities through this computational analysis suggests that human geography, "they say, "does in fact display statistically-significant patterns of structured regionalization." Commutes of 50 miles or

  • Like parents from the 1950s, AI still can’t understand comics. Here’s why
    Digital Trends

    Like parents from the 1950s, AI still can’t understand comics. Here’s why

    More recently, however, the bar has been raised — and a new research project carried out at the University of Maryland and University of Colorado has another recognition task in its sights: whether or not an AI can read comic books. As it happens, there’s nothing straightforward about comic books. “The task requires a lot of common sense and inference,” Mohit Iyyer, a fifth year Ph.D. student in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Maryland, College Park, told Digital Trends.

  • Swiss firm acquires Mars One private project
    AFP

    Swiss firm acquires Mars One private project

    A British-Dutch project aiming to send an unmanned mission to Mars by 2018 announced Friday that the shareholders of a Swiss financial services company have agreed a takeover bid. "The takeover provides a solid path to funding the next steps of Mars One's mission to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars," the statement added. Mars One consists of two entities: the Dutch not-for-profit Mars One Foundation and a British public limited company Mars One Ventures.