• Entertainment
    Indiewire

    John Malkovich Initially Thought ‘Being John Malkovich’ Should’ve Been ‘Being Tom Cruise’

    Malkovich, who stars in the new Netlix series "Space Force," reveals he was at first baffled by Kaufman's inventive screenplay.

    Thanks for your feedback!
  • U.S.
    Good Morning America

    Why people are flouting coronavirus social distancing precautions that we know save lives

    With more than 100,000 Americans dead and rising from the novel coronavirus, health experts and other leaders have been pleading for people to adhere to their strict guidelines to keep people safe. Psychology experts said they haven't been surprised by this type of behavior, since it's been a long-standing issue with public health: the ability for people to assess risk. Rajita Sinha, a professor of psychiatry at Yale University and the founding director of the Yale Stress Center, said the uncertainty about when the pandemic will end, access to information and one's underlying beliefs can influence someone to flout precautions.

    Thanks for your feedback!
  • Thanks for your feedback!
  • U.S.
    Refinery29

    The Traumatized 17-Year-Old Who Filmed George Floyd’s Killing Is Already Being Harassed

    In the wake of mass outcry and protest over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, the person who brought his story to light is already experiencing harassment. Darnella Frazier, the 17-year-old who took the video of George Floyd being suffocated and killed by police on Monday, now says that she’s facing a series of concerning messages online. Frazier took the video as proof of police brutality and the pain felt by thousands of people around the country, but is now the subject of some harassment as a result.According to her Facebook page, Frazier has been receiving numerous questions about why she didn’t fight off police for the duration of the 10 minute video depicting police kneeing Floyd in the neck. In her response, she says that she was scared as a 17-year-old to attempt to fight off any cops or help Floyd. “I don’t expect anyone who wasn’t placed in my position to understand why and how I feel the way that I do,” she wrote on Facebook. Later in the post she explained that she didn’t get involved because she didn’t want anyone else to be killed or put in the same position as George and she feared how the police would further retaliate. “If it wasn’t for me 4 cops would’ve still had their jobs, causing other problems,” she wrote. “The police most definitely would’ve swept it under the rug with a cover up story. Instead of bashing me, THANK ME! Because that could’ve been one of your loved ones and you would want to see the truth as well. Anyone with something negative to say pls block me. I’m not forcing you to watch me.”The pain and trauma that Frazier addresses in her post has resonated with so many. In addition to what she’s now going through, she returned to the scene of the killing the day after George Floyd’s death looking visibly shattered. A video was captured and posted online by NowThis, showing Frazier saying, “I watched this man die,” while crying. In the video, she hugs other members of the community protesting in that same area. “I posted the video last night and it just went viral,” she said through sobs, adding, “Everybody’s asking me how do I feel? I don’t know how to feel, ‘cause it’s so sad, bro. This man was literally right here at 8:00 pm yesterday. I was walking my cousin to the store, and I just see him on the ground and I’m like ‘What is going on?’” Ultimately, she ended her speech at the scene saying, “It is so traumatizing” while continuing to cry before putting her mask back on.Beyond the harassment she’s receiving online, concerns have amounted over how Frazier’s treatment fares against Ramsey Orta, the person who filmed Eric Garner’s murder. Orta was subjected to police harassment that eventually landed him in prison — a price he paid for revealing the police brutality inflicted on Garner. Now, advocates demand more protection for Frazier, who is a minor, and also witnessed a brutal police killing, saying that history cannot repeat.Refinery29 has reached out to Darnella Frazier for comment. We will update this story as we know more.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?CNN Reporter Omar Jimenez Arrested On Live TVYou Can Help Donate To The Minnesota Freed FundThis Is What Real Allyship Looks Like

    Thanks for your feedback!
  • Business
    The Fiscal Times

    $1,200 Checks? $450 Bonuses? The Latest on the Next Coronavirus Lifeline

    Congress has provided a lifeline for millions of Americans hurt by the coronavirus pandemic, providing a boost to incomes via one-time direct payments and implementing a range of other emergency programs to prevent more widespread financial hardship, joblessness and hunger.“This summer,” writes Ben Casselman at The New York Times, “that lifeline could snap.”As states continue to reopen and Congress considers the contours of a next coronavirus relief package, many of the unprecedented steps taken to help businesses and consumers weather the pandemic and economic shutdown are set to expire, creating uncertainty for those who have benefited — and for the economy overall.“The $1,200 checks sent to most households are long gone, at least for those who needed them most, with little imminent prospect for a second round. The lending program that helped millions of small businesses keep workers on the payroll will wind down if Congress does not extend it. Eviction moratoriums that are keeping people in their homes are expiring in many cities,” Casselman writes. “And the $600 per week in extra unemployment benefits that have allowed tens of millions of laid-off workers to pay rent and buy groceries will expire at the end of July.”Aneta Markowska, chief financial economist for the investment bank Jefferies, tells the Times that the legislation passed thus far, including the $2.2 trillion CARES Act, won’t be enough. “The CARES Act was massive, but it was a very short-term offset to what is likely to be a long-term problem,” she says. “This economy is clearly going to need more support.”What might that support look like? Here’s the latest:McConnell says decision on ‘fourth and final’ bill will come in about a month: The $3 trillion package passed by the House this month has little chance of getting through the Senate, where Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, while acknowledging this week that another aid bill is likely, has pushed for a pause, and for any additional legislation to be narrow. McConnell added Friday that the next coronavirus relief bill will be the final one. “We’re taking a careful look at a fourth and final bill,” McConnell said Friday. “You could anticipate the decision being made on whether to go forward in about a month. And it will be narrowly crafted, designed to help us where we are a month from now, not where we were three months ago.”House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and other Democrats have been urging Republicans to start negotiating immediately. "The cost of Republican inaction grows every day,” Schumer said Thursday. “Senate Republicans ought to stop sitting on their hands and work in a bipartisan way to provide the immediate help workers and families need.”Some Dems skeptical about more $1,200 stimulus checks: House Democrats included another round of $1,200 relief payments in their bill, but the idea of additional direct payments faces oppositions not only from Senate Republicans but some Democrats as well, The Hill’s Alexander Bolton reports.“I think the next round we’ve got to be more targeted to those who are really in need,” said Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD), according to The Hill. “So I hope we can target this a little bit better to those who have been hit hard because of COVID-19.” And Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) says that he would support another round of direct payments but that isn’t his top priority. “My top priorities are tying expanded unemployment benefits to economic conditions and providing more help for the smallest of small businesses,” he said in a statement cited by The Hill.$450 ‘back-to-work’ bonuses may be gaining momentum: With Republicans opposed to extending the $600-a-week in enhanced unemployment benefits set to expire at the end of July, Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) has proposed that the federal government provide payments of $450 a week for several weeks to people who go back to work and stop collecting unemployment.President Trump, who reportedly opposes extending the $600 unemployment-benefit boost, likes the back-to-work bonus idea, according to The Washington Post. "We've got to reward individuals for coming back to work," Larry Kudlow, the president’s top economic adviser, said Friday on Fox News. "There will be some kind of re-employment bonus. We're not going to go to the $600, that's a disincentive to work."Discussions are reportedly ongoing about how big the bonus should be and how long it should last. Some White House officials and Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX) have discussed allowing returning workers to get up to $1,200, the Post says.There are still concerns about the idea, though. “An extra $450 gives people an extra incentive to go back to work,” Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton, told the Post. “But the real issue is, how many jobs will we have and what kind of risk are people taking to go back to work?”Economists widely expect the unemployment rate to stay above 10% through the end of the year, meaning that back-to-work bonuses may have more limited reach. “If you talk about a return-to-work bonus and you’re not also extending unemployment insurance, that’s a problem,” labor economist Martha Gimbel of Schmidt Futures told the Post. “We know a lot of people will still be unemployed.”The bottom line: It’s likely going to be awhile before significant progress is made on the next coronavirus bill. A summer calendar sent by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) shows no votes happening before June 30, though Hoyer wrote to colleagues Friday that he expects the House will be in session “at some point in June,” once the Senate acts on a bill.Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.

    Thanks for your feedback!
  • U.S.
    The Daily Beast

    Here’s How Fox News Covered the CNN Reporter’s Arrest in Minneapolis

    Reporting on the arrest of a CNN reporter and his crew by Minnesota state police on Friday morning, Fox News anchor Sandra Smith framed the incident as a he said-he said situation despite the entire ordeal being broadcast on live television.Reporting from Minneapolis after another night of violent protests over the death of George Floyd, CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez found himself surrounded by a group of cops clad in riot gear. As the situation was broadcast on CNN’s New Day, Jimenez showed the officers his credentials and calmly asked them where they would like the crew to move.“Just put us back where you want us, we were getting out of your way,” Jimenez is heard saying to several officers. “So, just let us know. Wherever you want us, we will go. We were just getting out of your way while you were advancing through the intersection. Just let us know, and we’ve got you.”A moment later, Jimenez was told that he was under arrest and placed in handcuffs. Shortly after the CNN reporter was marched off, officers grabbed the producer and cameraman, placing them under arrest as well. All three were released within hours, with Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz apologizing to CNN over the incident. During Friday’s broadcast of America’s Newsroom, Smith delivered a short news report on Jimenez’s arrest. “Police in Minneapolis arresting a CNN reporter and his crew as the reporter was covering the protests there earlier this morning,” she said. “They were all released a couple of hours later and are back on the air.”Smith continued: “Police are saying the crew was asked to move and they refused, CNN is denying that. The governor of Minnesota issued an apology calling the arrest unacceptable, and we will hear from the governor at the top of the next hour.” Fox did not broadcast the video showing Jimenez specifically offering to move out of the way and go wherever the cops wanted his crew to go.The Minnesota state police would later issue a statement—to much ridicule—that said the troopers released the crew “once they were confirmed to be members of the media,” despite the fact that Jimenez showed his credentials and the situation was broadcast on live television.Earlier in the Fox News broadcast, Fox News contributor Lawrence Jones did briefly discuss Jimenez’s arrest during a panel discussion on the protests, noting that while he’s been “critical” of the network Jimenez “was arrested today on live television doing his job as a reporter.”“I’ve been there reporting on these types of cases,” he added. “You asked the cops, you say, where do I stand? He did that and he was still arrested on live television with his camera crew. That should not happen, this is not China, this is America.”With other networks offering statements of solidarity with CNN and Jimenez on Friday, Fox News followed suit later in the day, issuing the following statement: “FOX News has always supported the First Amendment and this instance is no different. We denounce the detainment of the CNN crew and stand with them in protecting the right to report without fear or favor."Hours after Smith's report, Outnumbered Overtime anchor Harris Faulkner addressed that segment on-air, noting that the report should have highlighted that Jimenez offered to move wherever the officers to him to go.“Police in Minneapolis have arrested a CNN reporter and his crew live on the air and they covered the protests breaking out on the ground over George Floyd’s death,” Faulkner said. “It was all caught on camera. It played out live. There is the video. They have since been released - a couple hours later from that event.”“Police said the crew was asked to move and they refused. We can all watch the video and it shows the reporter offered to move many times if the officers would tell him where to go,” she added. “That point should have been noted in earlier reporting on Fox News. The governor of Minnesota apologized directly to CNN and that team during his news conference a short time ago, we showed you that live, calling the arrests 'unacceptable.'”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Thanks for your feedback!
  • Business
    Yahoo Finance

    Student loan borrowers sue Betsy DeVos and Steven Mnuchin over seized tax refunds

    Consumer advocates are suing Betsy DeVos and Steven Mnuchin for their departments’ failure to stop seizing student loan borrowers’ tax refunds to pay for their defaulted loans, despite declaring that it would stop doing so on March 25.

    Thanks for your feedback!