• World
    The Guardian

    Missing Mexican congresswoman's body found a month after abduction

    * Anel Bueno, 38, was snatched in Pacific coast town * Area important for drug cartels is country’s murder capitalThe body of a missing Mexican congresswoman has been found in a shallow grave more than a month after she was abducted by armed men while raising awareness about the coronavirus pandemic.Anel Bueno, a 38-year-old lawmaker from the western state of Colima, was snatched on 29 April in Ixtlahuacán, a town on a stretch of Mexico’s Pacific coast that the drug trade has made one of the country’s most murderous regions.Mexico’s President Andrés Manuel López Obrador told reporters on Wednesday a suspect had been detained over the killing of Bueno, who was a member of his party, Morena.“We still don’t know the causes,” López Obrador added.Indira Vizcaíno, a local politician from the same party, tweeted: “Your departure hurts me deeply – I’m saddened not just by the fact but by the cruelty.”Vizcaíno, another López Obrador ally, said authorities were fighting to catch the killers “and bring justice – for this case and all of our country’s victims”.Ixtlahuacán is a 30-minute drive from Tecomán, a picturesque seaside town that has earned the unenviable reputation as Mexico’s most murderous municipality because of its strategic position for drug smuggling cartels.In 2017 Tecomán’s murder rate of a reported 172.5 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants resembled that of a war zone. Last year more than 100 clandestine cemeteries were found there containing the bodies of those who had dared cross the cartels.Colima is one of five Mexican states the United States state department urges travellers against visiting.Calderón sends in the armyMexico’s “war on drugs” began in late 2006 when the president at the time, Felipe Calderón, ordered thousands of troops onto the streets in response to an explosion of horrific violence in his native state of Michoacán.Calderón hoped to smash the drug cartels with his heavily militarized onslaught but the approach was counter-productive and exacted a catastrophic human toll. As Mexico’s military went on the offensive, the body count sky-rocketed to new heights and tens of thousands were forced from their homes, disappeared or killed.Kingpin strategySimultaneously Calderón also began pursuing the so-called “kingpin strategy” by which authorities sought to decapitate the cartels by targeting their leaders.That policy resulted in some high-profile scalps – notably Arturo Beltrán Leyva who was gunned down by Mexican marines in 2009 – but also did little to bring peace. In fact, many believe such tactics served only to pulverize the world of organized crime, creating even more violence as new, less predictable factions squabbled for their piece of the pie.Under Calderón’s successor, Enrique Peña Nieto, the government’s rhetoric on crime softened as Mexico sought to shed its reputation as the headquarters of some the world’s most murderous mafia groups.But Calderón’s policies largely survived, with authorities targeting prominent cartel leaders such as Sinaloa’s Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán.When “El Chapo” was arrested in early 2016, Mexico’s president bragged: “Mission accomplished”. But the violence went on. By the time Peña Nieto left office in 2018, Mexico had suffered another record year of murders, with nearly 36,000 people slain."Hugs not bullets"The leftwing populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador took power in December, promising a dramatic change in tactics. López Obrador, or Amlo as most call him, vowed to attack the social roots of crime, offering vocational training to more than 2.3 million disadvantaged young people at risk of being ensnared by the cartels. “It will be virtually impossible to achieve peace without justice and [social] welfare,” Amlo said, promising to slash the murder rate from an average of 89 killings per day with his “hugs not bullets” doctrine.Amlo also pledged to chair daily 6am security meetings and create a 60,000 strong "National Guard". But those measures have yet to pay off, with the new security force used mostly to hunt Central American migrants.Mexico now suffers an average of about 96 murders per day, with nearly 29,000 people killed since Amlo took office.During a 2018 interview with the Guardian, Vizcaíno backed one of the key pledges López Obrador made to Mexicans ahead of his election that year – that efforts to combat organised crime would start to tackle the social roots of crime and no longer “just be a matter of fighting fire with fire”.“Crime rates aren’t going up because the people feel like being bad. Crime rates are going up because people need to eat,” Vizcaíno said at a restaurant in Colima’s capital that was the scene of a 2015 assassination attempt on its ex-governor.Bueno had been attempting to raise awareness of Covid-19 prevention techniques when armed men swept into the area on pickup trucks and ordered her inside.During a 2018 interview Tecomán’s mayor, Elías Lozano, blamed the bloodshed blighting the region on “the lack of honest politicians”.“That’s the root of it all. Politicians had the choice of deciding between staying on the sidelines or getting involved – and many decided to get involved because there were economic benefits,” he said.

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  • Celebrity
    Good Morning America

    Jennifer Aniston's nude portrait is being auctioned for COVID-19 relief

    One of Jennifer Aniston's most famous portraits is heading to the auction block for COVID-19 relief. Aniston, 51, revealed on Instagram over the weekend that photographer Mark Seliger organized the auction. "My dear friend @markseliger teamed up with @radvocacy and @christiesinc to auction 25 of his portraits - including mine - for COVID-19 relief," the "Friends" alum announced.

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  • U.S.
    MarketWatch

    Coronavirus update: U.S. case tally tops 1.8 million; study finds face masks, social distancing effective at reducing infections

    The number of Americans with confirmed case of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 climbed above 1.8 million on Tuesday, amid concerns that protests about the death of George Floyd last week, and people gathering in groups as lockdowns are lifted, will spark a fresh wave of infections. Trump, meanwhile, threatened to mobilize the military to restore peace across the U.S. late Monday, after days of protests at the death of the unarmed Floyd at the hands of a white police officer in cities, including New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, Atlanta, and Washington, D.C., some of which turned violent.

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  • Celebrity
    The Wrap

    Ellen DeGeneres Attempts a Do-Over on #BLM Statement: ‘I Know I’m Not Gonna Say the Right Thing’

    Ellen DeGeneres spoke out on the Black Lives Matter movement Tuesday, days after deleting her first attempt to address the matter on Twitter.In a video posted on her Instagram account, the talk show host said she was “so sad” and “so angry” over the “people” who are “getting away with murder” — but not before giving a disclaimer to her many internet critics whom she expects will be “in disagreement with what I say.”“I haven’t spoken directly because I don’t know what to say. I am so sad and I am so angry, and I know I’m not going to say the right thing,” DeGeneres began. “I know there are going to be a lot of people who are going to be in disagreement with what I say. But I have a platform and I have a voice and I have always stood for equality.”Also Read: The LAPD Instigated a Riot, Falsely Arrested Me and Now I'm a BLM Activist (Guest Blog)Earlier this week, the talk show host was caught deleting a tweet that showed support for the Black Lives Matter movement after Twitter users responded with criticisms that her message was too vague and implored her to show proof of where she’s donated to help the movement. She later replaced the deleted tweet with a thread listing where she had made donations and pledging her support to protesters who are “standing up against the horrible injustices that Black people in America face everyday.”DeGeneres has been under fire over the past several months, ever since a photo of her attending a sports game with former president George W. Bush went viral, leading many to criticize her for being friends with “war criminals.” She also came under fire in early April over a comment she made during an at-home taping of her talk show in which she compared self-isolating at her mansion in Los Angeles to “being in jail.”Now, DeGeneres is vowing to continue to “be the voice for people who felt like they didn’t have a voice.”Also Read: LAPD's Public Zoom Call Over Protests Turns Into Nonstop Demands for Chief to Resign (Video)“I know what that feels like,” she wrote. “And maybe you don’t agree with how it’s coming out, but you have to understand it, and then we can heal it. I just, I’m just so sorry that it’s come to this. I really don’t know what to say other than this has gone on way, way, way too long. People have gotten away with murder and that’s what’s happening.”Watch the full video below:View this post on Instagram Sign a petition. Make a donation. Get informed. Make a phone call. Do it all from the link in my bio.A post shared by Ellen DeGeneres (@theellenshow) on Jun 1, 2020 at 2:08pm PDTRead original story Ellen DeGeneres Attempts a Do-Over on BLM Statement: ‘I Know I’m Not Gonna Say the Right Thing’ At TheWrap

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  • Celebrity
    People

    Nick Cordero's Wife Says She's Been 'Told to Say Goodbye' But Is Still Fighting as He Gets 'Slightly Better'

    Nick Cordero's wife, Amanda Kloots, has been chronicling her husband's recovery from coronavirus on Instagram

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