Visual Arts

The School of Visual Arts is a for-profit art and design college in Manhattan, New York. It was founded in 1947, and is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design.
Latest news and discussion about the visual arts.
  • Modern Indian art at the Asia Society Museum in New York
    www.wsws.org

    Modern Indian art at the Asia Society Museum in New York

    The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India By Josh Varlin and Evan Cohen 20 February 2019 The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India; an exhibition at the Asia Society Museum, New York City through January 20, 2019, curated by Dr. Zehra Jumabhoy and Boon Hui Tan.Progressive Artists Group exhibition, 1949. Courtesy The Raza Archives, The Raza Foundation, New Delhi, India. The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India, an exhibition at the Asia Society Museum in New York City on the Progressive Artists' Group (PAG), was a valuable opportunity to view works from one of the most significant groups in Indian modern art. The PAG was founded in 1947 in Bombay (now Mumbai)

  • Multidisciplinary artist delves into refugee issue
    DailySabah

    Multidisciplinary artist delves into refugee issue

    Kezban Arca Batıbeki's solo exhibition "Unpromised Lands" is at Pilevneli Mecidiyeköy until March 24. In her collages, Batıbeki manages to depict the stories of the people in migration regions, the refugees and migrants who are either forced to leave or who choose to leave their home. She uses a tone of subtle distance, without trivializing nor dramatizing the issue. In this series, through her narrative, Batıbeki illustrates different worlds that reflect usual and unusual states of mankind. Old landscape paintings adopted as portrayals of ideal depictions of nature, which are integrated with the rest of the canvas through plastic intervention, are the main focus of Batıbeki's compositions. They

  • Universal Unveils Massive Monster Mural on Studio Lot
    The Hollywood Reporter

    Universal Unveils Massive Monster Mural on Studio Lot

    In the wake of the 2017 Tom Cruise flop The Mummy, which failed to launch Universal's planned Dark Universe, the studio's classic monsters slinked briefly into the shadows. But Frankenstein and friends are living large again — and not just in films like the just-announced Invisible Man from horror filmmaker Leigh Whannell and Blumhouse. On a 50-by-200-foot wall on the studio's Universal City backlot, street artist Tristan Eaton has nearly completed work on a massive monster mural. Eaton grew up in Los Angeles fantasizing about being in a monster movie, and earlier in February he got pretty close. Working on a boom lift 25 feet in the air, can of spray paint in hand, he heard screaming from behind

  • The $22 trillion elephant in the room: Political Cartoons
    Whittier Daily News

    The $22 trillion elephant in the room: Political Cartoons

    Check out our regular cartoon gallery featuring some of the best cartoonists from around the world, and across the political spectrum, covering current issues and figures.

  • OC artists and galleries represent at LA art fair
    Orange County Register

    OC artists and galleries represent at LA art fair

    Susan Spiritus Gallery is located off MacArthur Blvd., opposite John Wayne Airport on the Newport Beach/Irvine border. “I just say it's Newport Beach because I've lived there for years,” says Spiritus with a throaty laugh. But on this day the gallery owner/photo dealer is neither in Irvine nor Newport Beach, but a county away, in Barker Hangar at the Santa Monica Airport where on Feb. 1, Photo L.A. kicked off the annual February fortnight of Los Angeles art fairs. Every year, Spiritus, along with dozens of top dealers from around the world, packs up photographs from her O.C. gallery and makes the trek to Photo L.A. where she installs a pop-up exhibition for art lovers and buyers who would probably

  • From Rembrandt to Warhol: The best exhibits at European museums for winter 2019
    Louisville Courier-Journal

    From Rembrandt to Warhol: The best exhibits at European museums for winter 2019

    Museums throughout Europe are hosting thought-provoking and visually striking temporary exhibits this winter. It's time for anniversary celebrations at two museums — the 200th at the Prado in Madrid and the 10th at the Hermitage in Amsterdam. It's a great season for work by favorite artists including Rembrandt, Diego Velázquez and Andy Warhol, as well as some lesser-known painters including Canaletto and Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida. Look also for American art in Germany, Buddhist art in Switzerland and a unique study of LGBTQ representation in video games in Berlin. 'Museo del Prado 1819-2019: A Place of Recollection' at the Prado in Madrid Through March 10 It's been 200 years since Spain's Prado

  • The Hanford Sentinel

    Good design in everyday products is focus of MoMA exhibit

    From early Tupperware containers to Chemex coffee makers to sleek midcentury modern furniture, a new show at the Museum of Modern Art explores the democratizing and uplifting potential of design in everyday life. "The Value of Good Design" opened Feb. 10 and runs through June 15 at the museum, which is preparing to close its doors temporarily this summer before opening a newly expanded campus later in the year. The exhibit takes a fresh look at everything from domestic furnishings and appliances to ceramics, glass, electronics, transport design, sporting goods, toys and graphics. It focuses on household goods designed in the '40s and '50s as part of MoMA's Good Design initiatives, which included competitions, exhibits, TV shows, educational programs and even three fully furnished houses built in the Museum Garden.

  • Hockney and Van Gogh in the spotlight in Amsterdam exhibition
    AFP Relax News

    Hockney and Van Gogh in the spotlight in Amsterdam exhibition

    Next month, the Van Gogh Museum is putting the spotlight on a seemingly unlikely pairing, revealing the influence that Vincent van Gogh had on David Hockney and examining themes such as nature and bright colors that are common to both artists' work. Capturing the seasons and the changing nature of light and space, his works from that period show a clear link, says the Van Gogh Museum, with works by the Dutch master such as "The Harvest" (1888), "Field with Irises near Arles" (1888) and "The Garden of Saint Paul's Hospital" ("Leaf-Fall") (1889). In a particularly strong example of the similarities across their works, the museum highlights the stylized vertical lines of the tree trunks in that latter work by Van Gogh, comparing them to the repetitive lines seen in Hockney's "The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire" (2011).

  • Chef Mina Stone Will Open Restaurant at MoMA PS1 -
    ARTnews

    Chef Mina Stone Will Open Restaurant at MoMA PS1 -

    KIITO-SAN While mourning continues for M. Wells Dinette, which will soon close after more than six glorious years serving as the restaurant of New York's MoMA PS1, the Kunsthalle in Queens has announced its successor: Mina's by chef Mina Stone. The restaurant, Stone's first, will serve “creative Mediterranean-inspired cuisine,” per the museum, with seasonal ingredients being a focus on its frequently changing menu. Stone is a fixture in the New York art world, cooking gallery dinners for Gavin Brown's Enterprise and lunches for the studio of Urs Fischer. In 2015, she released a book of recipes, Cooking for Artists, on Fischer's imprint Kiito-San. Asked to describe Stone's meals in a 2016 interview,

  • Matty Healy Discusses the Idea of Masculinity and Using Art to Overcome Anxiety
    ALT 103.7

    Matty Healy Discusses the Idea of Masculinity and Using Art to Overcome Anxiety

    Matty Healy is the eloquent, honest, and multi-talented leader of The 1975. In a new cover story for GQ Hype, the captivating frontman went from painting giant canvases to be used on the magazine's cover to diving into deep topics. Related: Matty Healy Details “Experimental” Nature of Upcoming Album While his vocal and lyrical talents are recognized by millions, Matty is apparently also secretly a painter. After painting the cover of the most recent issue of GQ Hype, he explained how art has helped him overcome the noise of insecurities and anxiety. “Art is a place where you don't have to worry about those kinds of things… because it's my only option left, really, in regards to the desire to

  • Phillips to Auction 164 Lots of 20th Century and Contemporary Art
    www.barrons.com

    Phillips to Auction 164 Lots of 20th Century and Contemporary Art

    Phillips will auction 164 pieces of 20th century and contemporary art at an evening sale March 7 and a day sale March 8 in London. The auction will include works by German artists, such as Gerhard Richter and Martin Kippenberger, as well as pieces by African-American and modern artists. “The March sales of 20th Century & Contemporary Art bring together a strong and diverse group of artworks that encompass the very best of the artistic movements from the past seven decades,” senior specialist Rosanna Widén, head of the evening sale, said in a news release. Richter's “Düsenjäger (Jet Fighter)” will lead the evening sale, expecting to sell between £10 million and 15 million ($13.06-19.6 million).

  • Collectible Folk Art
    Stone Mountain-Lithonia, GA Patch

    Collectible Folk Art

    Images often range from scenes of ordinary living to the majesty of a vision of heaven. The surfaces are canvass, wood, paper, old furniture and even cloth. That's the signature of the folk artist, those artisans who were born with creative minds that compelled them to transfer visions onto a surface. Olivia Thomason, an award-winnning Georgia artist, still paints almost daily in her home studio located in Stone Mountain Historic Village. Missionary Mary Proctor, one of the most enjoyable of them all, paints from her home in Tallahassee, Florida. Jon Nix, born on Georgia's Cumberland Island, interprets life in Midtown Atlanta like no other. And, much of their inspiration came from masters like

  • In an increasingly expensive Seattle, artist residencies provide much-needed space and support
    The Seattle Times

    In an increasingly expensive Seattle, artist residencies provide much-needed space and support

    Some artists dream of faraway artist residencies, living and creating work in unusual buildings or exotic locales: a tiny treehouse in Scotland; a container on a commercial cargo ship; the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (yes, all of these are artist residencies). Residencies have been around for decades, but with sky-high real estate prices and expanding attention to the need for equitable opportunities for diverse artists, more and more residencies have cropped up in recent years. Residency programs vary from live-in spaces where artists can stay — temporarily, and usually free of charge — to work-only spaces that provide artists much-needed elbow room to develop ideas and exhibit new projects.

  • Artist hopes HMNS exhibit will bug kids enough to get out and see nature
    Houston Chronicle

    Artist hopes HMNS exhibit will bug kids enough to get out and see nature

    Caption Close The Houston Museum of Natural Science's "Biophilia" exhibit seems like just the kind of museum attraction any child would like. Imagine any kid turning down a chance to see preserved (a euphemism for dead) beetles, birds, fish, reptiles, or even an eel or gecko, displayed like mosaics or a kaleidoscope image. Christopher Marley says the indication of how much children like his shows is the number of fingerprints on the glass covering the lifeless animals. The Oregon-based artist says one of his goals of his art is to get children off their smartphones or other devices. Afterall, "biophilia" translates to "love of life," and Marley hopes he can instill that in those who see his works.

  • Art = peace of mind
    Portland Tribune

    Art = peace of mind

    In wake of family tragedy, Boring resident Mike Schuster found solace in creativity During the most difficult period of his life, when he wasn't sure how he would go on, Mike Schuster turned to art. His wife, Christine, had just passed away, leaving Schuster as a young widower trying to raise two boys, ages 10 and 12, while keeping everything together. That first year without her passed as if in a haze, he said, attempting to balance work and the household. He noticed he was becoming short-tempered — and stressed. "I was trying to be a solo parent, keep everything under control. How the boys and I made it through that …" Schuster said, trailing off. "I needed to slow down and take some time for