U.S. Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The composition and powers of the Senate are established by Article One of the United States Constitution.
Follow what's going on in the U.S. Senate.
  • 'That's treason!' Candidates clash over Taliban comment at Arizona Senate debate
    ABC News

    'That's treason!' Candidates clash over Taliban comment at Arizona Senate debate

    The only debate in the Arizona Senate race ended with fireworks as Republican nominee Rep. Martha McSally accused her Democratic opponent Rep. Kyrsten Sinema of treason Monday night. The slam came in reference to a 2003 video clip that was unearthed wherein Sinema said that she wouldn't care if an American joined the Taliban. "That's treason!" McSally nearly screamed, looking directly at Sinema.

  • US midterm elections 2018 poll tracker: Who will win the Congress?
    The Telegraph

    US midterm elections 2018 poll tracker: Who will win the Congress?

    On November 6, America will go to the polls to elect members for each of the 435 House seats and 35 of the 100 Senate seats in Congress. Donald Trump and the Republicans will hope to maintain their majority in both houses during the midterm elections, but with the Democrats having a healthy lead in the polls, it is believed that they have a decent chance of taking the House of Representatives. A Democrat victory in either chamber would grant powers to open investigations into President Trump, so the stakes are high. The latest polling and forecasts indicate that Donald Trump and the Republicans could hold onto both houses, although the House of Representatives looks the more likely to fall to the Democrats. But the Republican president, who has faced tough weeks after his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty of eight charges in his fraud trial, is reportedly planning 40 days of campaigning for the elections, and so the polls are likely to move further before election day. US mid term elections header General ballot between Republicans and Democrats The latest polls show that the Democrats are around eight percentage points ahead of the Republicans, standing at an average of 47.1 per cent compared to the Republicans’ 40 per cent. This is an average of the last eight polls, and has indicated a consistent lead for the Democrats on a national level. While the Democrats are ahead in the general ballot, both the House of Representatives and the Senate are decided by a series of local elections, which means that the Republicans may still hold both houses. The Democrats need 24 seats to flip the House of Representatives, and two to flip the Senate. But to make matters harder, the Democrats are defending 26 of the 35 seats up for election in the Senate this time. US mid term elections poll tracker House of Representatives forecast: Democrats knocking on the door Of the 435 seats up for re-election in the House of Representatives, the Democrats need to flip 24 seats - something that should be within reach for the party. The latest forecast, from the Cook Report, has the Democrats on a likely 205 seats and the Republicans on 199. This means that the remaining 31 "toss-up" seats, which are too close to call, will be incredibly important for the outcome of the election. House of Representatives forecast Senate forecast: A tough Republican nut to crack Only needing two seats to take the Senate, it would at first seem that the Democrats should be able to take control. But there is an issue with this: Of the 35 seats up for election, 26 are currently defended by the Democrats. That means that the Democrats need to claim two seats from the remaining eight Republican-defended seats. According to the Cook Report forecast, this seems unlikely, as there are only 45 seats that are marked as "leaning" Democrat or stronger. To claim a majority, the party would have to pick up a further six seats that are either toss-ups or leaning towards the Republicans Senate forecast Key seats to watch In the 2016 presidential election, Trump won big in rural and working class communities. This helped him flip - albeit with small margins - traditionally Democrat states in the rust belt, including Wisconsin and Michigan.  If the Democrats are to have hope of taking the House of Representatives from the Republicans, they need to ensure that they retain seats in these areas, before moving onto Republican territory in others. US cartogram map - House seat forecasts A series of both Republican and Democrat seats are currently classed as a "toss-up" by the Cook Report, indicating that there could be turnovers for both parts in the mid terms. The Republicans will hope to hold onto their under siege seats in places like Tennessee and West Virginia, while making inroads in Democrat areas that Trump claimed with huge majorites in the 2016 presidential election. Seats in Indiana and North Dakota are among those places where the Republicans will hope that Trump's base will help them flip seats.  Key seats to watch in the Senate Does President Trump's approval rating matter? Donald Trump's approval ratings are at relatively healthy and stable levels as the mid-terms according to The Telegraph's poll tracker. The tracker, which takes an average of the last eight polls, puts Trump's approval rating on 41 per cent in mid-September.  While this level is quite high for Trump, it is relatively low for sitting presidents - and this is important, as presidential approval ratings are a good indicator of net losses at mid term elections.  Only two presidents - Truman (1946 and 1950), and Bush (2006) - had a lower approval rating than Trump when going into their respective mid term elections. All three of these ended up losing over 28 seats in the House of Representatives and over five in the Senate. Presidential approval matters, and Trump’s is lower than most The Telegraph's poll tracker takes an average of the last eight polls in order to take a  full picture of the broad movements in the polling environment and not put too much weight on individual polls. Polls used are nationally representative with adequate sample sizes.

  • Minnesota Republican Senate candidate Karin Housley once compared Michelle Obama to a 'chimp'
    Chicago Tribune

    Minnesota Republican Senate candidate Karin Housley once compared Michelle Obama to a 'chimp'

    Minnesotan Karin Housley, Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate, once compared former first lady Michelle Obama to a "chimp," according to a Facebook posting reported Monday by the Huffington Post. In the 2009 post, Housley opined on the former first lady's posture and compared her to a chimpanzee from the 1951 film, "Bedtime for Bonzo," which starred Ronald Reagan. "Speaking of Bedtime for Bonzo, I think even that chimp stood up straighter than Michelle. Uh-oh, someone is going to make a comment," Housley wrote, according to a screenshot of the post reported by the Huffington Post. Racist attacks comparing black people to monkeys have a long history in the United States. After Republican Florida

  • Shapiro presses Senate to pass grand jury recommendations
    The Charlotte Observer

    Shapiro presses Senate to pass grand jury recommendations

    Attorney General Josh Shapiro said Monday that recommendations from a state grand jury report that found Roman Catholic priests sexually abused more than a thousand children over decades will pass if given a vote in Pennsylvania's Senate. Shapiro spoke while greeting victims of sexual abuse demonstrating outside Senate offices where Republican lawmakers were meeting privately to discuss legislation to respond to the grand jury report. Leaders of the Senate's huge Republican majority have not promised a floor vote on all four recommendations. The chamber's top Republican, President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati, has maintained that one recommendation is unconstitutional. That recommendation is to give

  • US Senators ask India's PM to rethink strict data localization plans
    Engadget

    US Senators ask India's PM to rethink strict data localization plans

    Starting on October 15th, global payment giants such as Mastercard, Visa and AMEX would have to store transactions that occurred in India on servers physically located within the country. Now, US Senators John Cornyn and Mark Warner have written a letter to India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, urging the country to soften its stance on data localization.

  • Former Senate Intelligence Staffer James Wolfe Pleads Guilty to Lying to the Feds
    The Daily Beast

    Former Senate Intelligence Staffer James Wolfe Pleads Guilty to Lying to the Feds

    Former Senate Intelligence Committee staffer James Wolfe on Monday pleaded guilty to lying to federal authorities, BuzzFeed News reports. The Times reported Watkins had her “email and phone records seized by federal prosecutors” after Wolfe was charged with lying about his communications with Watkins and three other unnamed reporters.

  • WATCH: Debbie Stabenow, John James Debate Ahead Of Election
    Hartland, MI Patch

    WATCH: Debbie Stabenow, John James Debate Ahead Of Election

    DETROIT, MI — Current Democratic U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow and her challenger Republican Senate Candidate John James, will face off in a debate on Monday afternoon in Detroit. The debate, which is being put on by the Detroit Economic Club, will take place at the MotorCity Casino Hotel Ballroom at 12:30 p.m. and it is not open to the public. Watch the debate below:

  • Rick Scott features Stoneman Douglas dad Andrew Pollack in latest Senate race TV ad
    Orlando Sentinel

    Rick Scott features Stoneman Douglas dad Andrew Pollack in latest Senate race TV ad

    Rick Scott's campaign for U.S. Senate released a TV ad on Monday that features a testimonial from Andrew Pollack, whose daughter Meadow was killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre. The new ad is entitled “Meadow.” It is stark and affecting and doesn't include the dramatic music often featured in political ads. At one minute, it's twice as long as most political spots. It consists entirely of Pollack speaking, except for Scott's voice giving the legally required disclosure at the end about approving the content of the message. It's mostly Pollack talking directly to the camera, interspersed with still photographs of his daughter, the school and Scott, who is currently governor

  • Senate aide pleads guilty to lying to FBI
    Associated Press

    Senate aide pleads guilty to lying to FBI

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A former Senate intelligence committee employee has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI.

  • W.Va. Senate postpones acting on impeachment trial ruling
    The Pueblo Chieftain

    W.Va. Senate postpones acting on impeachment trial ruling

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — The West Virginia Senate has postponed the impeachment trial of a state Supreme Court justice after a judge who was to preside over the trial failed to show up. The impeachment trial of Justice Margaret Workman was to begin Monday, but Acting Chief Justice Paul Farrell was absent. Given that and some lingering questions, the Senate voted to adjourn. Workman won a reprieve last week when acting Supreme Court justices ruled her trial would violate the state constitution's separation of powers clause. Four justices, including Workman, were impeached by the state House in August over questions involving alleged lavish office renovations and neglect of duty. The court's fifth

  • Trump opponent Warren reveals DNA test in challenge to president
    AFP

    Trump opponent Warren reveals DNA test in challenge to president

    US Senator Elizabeth Warren, a potential 2020 Democratic presidential contender, released DNA test results Monday confirming her Native American ancestry and challenged Donald Trump to donate the $1 million he promised if the results proved her claim. "The facts suggest that you absolutely have a Native American ancestor in your pedigree," Bustamante said in a video released by Warren on Twitter.

  • Congressional roll call: How WNC's DC reps voted week of Oct. 5
    Citizen Times

    Congressional roll call: How WNC's DC reps voted week of Oct. 5

    WASHINGTON — Here's a look at how area members of Congress voted over the previous week. Along with roll call votes this week, the Senate also passed the CBP HiRe Act (S. 1305), to provide U.S. Customs and Border Protection with adequate flexibility in its employment authorities; the Iraq and Syria Genocide Emergency Relief and Accountability Act (H.R. 390); and the RBIC Advisers Relief Act (S. 2765), to exempt investment advisers who solely advise certain rural business investment companies. There were no key votes in the House this week. Senate votes Vote 1: KAVANAUGH CLOTURE VOTE: The Senate has agreed to a cloture motion to end debate on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to serve as a