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  • 10 superb restaurants that show off Lisbon's thriving foodie scene
    The Telegraph

    10 superb restaurants that show off Lisbon's thriving foodie scene

    The Lisbon food scene has undergone an enormous change within the last few years and continues to boom, with restaurants launching fast and furious. An influential wave of young local chefs, such as Henrique Sá Pessoa and of course the legendary Jose Avillez, have remained loyal to the culture of the Portuguese table whilst reimagining it afresh, drawing on the endless bounty from the sea and coastline, the mountains, plains and vineyards. International chefs, such as acclaimed Peruvian Diogo Muñoz, have arrived too, offering diversity on a previously almost uniquely Portuguese platform. But dining out here is not merely about fashion or trends – food is held in high regard by 'lisboetas' and eating out is a necessity rather than a luxury. Just make sure you book a table.

  • 10 superb restaurants that show off Lisbon's thriving foodie scene
    The Telegraph

    10 superb restaurants that show off Lisbon's thriving foodie scene

    Expert guide to Lisbon Overview Attractions Restaurants Nightlife Shopping Itineraries The Lisbon food scene has undergone an enormous change within the last few years and continues to boom, with restaurants launching fast and furious. An influential wave of young local chefs, such as Henrique Sá Pessoa and of course the legendary Jose Avillez, have remained loyal to the culture of the Portuguese table whilst reimagining it afresh, drawing on the endless bounty from the sea and coastline, the mountains, plains and vineyards. International chefs, such as acclaimed Peruvian Diogo Muñoz, have arrived too, offering diversity on a previously almost uniquely Portuguese platform. But dining out here is not merely about fashion or trends – food is held in high regard by 'lisboetas' and eating out is a necessity rather than a luxury. Just make sure you book a table. Belém Feitoria Feitoria is found right on the banks of the River Tagus in historical Belém, where the great Portuguese explorers set sail. This gourmet restaurant pays homage to the spices found on those journeys, weaving them through the menu. Chef João Rodrigues, holder of a Michelin star here since 2011, creates a rich tapestry of Portuguese flavours from the oysters with carolino rice, burnt samphire and seaweed to the earthy pigeon, chestnut, wild mushrooms, fois gras and truffle. Wine pairing is expertly done with little known gems from around the country. A Nanban panel at the entrance, clad in gold leaf, sets the tone. Contact:00 351 210 400 208; restaurantefeitoria.com Prices: £££ Opening times: Tues-Sat, 7.30pm-11pm Reservations: Essential The gourmet dishes at Feitoria pay homage to the spices that Portuguese explorers found when they set sail from the banks of the River Tagus • The best things to do in Lisbon Chiado Alma This warm and welcoming restaurant has simple interiors of stone floors, wooden tables and vaulted stone arches, all illuminated by bronze lamps. In the open kitchen you will find Henrique Sá Pessoa, who won his first Michelin star here in 2017. Low ceilings and the intimate atmosphere allow you to concentrate on the plates which lay the culinary soul of Portugal before you. Menus range from a five-course 'coast to coast' option inspired by the sea to a tasting menu of Sá Pessoa’s favourite dishes. From the former, don't miss the steamed Azores parrot fish with bulhão pato (clam rice) and codium. Contact: 00 351 213 470 650; almalisboa.pt Prices: ££ Opening times: Tues-Sun, 12.30pm-3.30pm, 7pm-11pm Reservations: Essential Alma is a warm and welcoming restaurant with sophisticated plates that lay the culinary soul of Portugal before you • An insider's guide to Lisbon Mini Bar This gastro-bar is a favourite in the Jose Avillez empire. It's housed in an old theatre, perfectly suited to the culinary tricks employed here. The Ferrero Rocher is not what it seems, the ceviche of Algarve prawns comes served on a wedge of lime, and the green apple caipirinhas are eaten not drunk. Expect an informal atmosphere with affordable prices and friendly staff that ensure you have a really fun evening out. Menus are divided into 'Acts', tasting menus are entitled 'Now On', the bar serves a selection of craft beers, cocktails and wines, and on Fridays and Saturdays there is a live DJ. Contact:00 351 21 130 53 93; minibar.pt Prices: ££ Opening times: Daily, 7pm-1am Reservations: Essential The ceviche of Algarve prawns at Mini Bar comes served on a wedge of lime Credit: Boa Onda • Lisbon's best nightlife Cantina Peruana Cantina Peruana burst onto the food scene in late 2017 thanks to Diogo Muñoz, the first Peruvian chef to open up a restaurant here. He did so with the help of his buddy Jose Avillez, who made room for the sensational food and memorable pisco bar in his buzzy Bairro do Avillez (a collection of restaurants under one roof). The sharing menu explores the diversity of Peruvian cuisine, from the sea with tiradito (fish) to the mountains with choclo (corn) to Lima’s favourite streetfood, anticucho, which here was rich, tender pork, glazed with a ginger and red shiso sauce for a Japanese-Peruvian twist. Contact: 00 351 215 842 002; cantinaperuana.pt Prices: ££ Opening times: Daily, 7pm-12pm; lunch Sat-Sun and holidays, 12.30pm-3pm Reservations: Recommended The sharing menu at Cantina Peruana explores the diversity of Peruvian cuisine Credit: Grupo José Avillez • The best restaurants in Porto Cais do Sodré Confraria, Time Out Market The Time Out Market opened in 2014, inside the city's former food market hall which had been going since 1892. Now a major foodie destination, stalls around the hall under the splendid oriental dome allow the public to try dishes from many well known chefs, that otherwise might be out of budget. Confraria does Lisbon’s best sushi with a trademark fusion style that was honed at its restaurant in Cascais. Here, order as much as you can eat from the gyozas and the hot Philadelphias (salmon, breaded shrimps and cream cheese) to the uramaki and tataki. It's all too good to miss. Contact: 00 351 213 951 274; timeoutmarket.com Prices: £ Opening times: Sun-Wed, 10am-12am; Thurs-Sat, 10am-2am Reservations: Walk-ins only The Time Out Market is a major foodie destination in Lisbon Ibo Ibo is housed in a former salt warehouse right on the banks of the River Tagus, and the menu pays tribute to the cuisine of Mozambique, once a Portuguese colony. The contemporary interiors are clad in white, blue and purple, and dishes such as crab and mango salad, Goan-style samosas, kid chacuti (goat stew), grilled tiger prawns with piri-piri sauce and crab curry display the interweaving of Portuguese gastronomy with the flavours of Mozambique, as well as influences from another former Portuguese colony, Goa. Don’t miss the fish loins in coconut and coriander sauce with sweet potato and cassava purée. Contact: 00 351 213 423 611; ibo-restaurant.pt Prices: £££ Opening times: Tues-Fri, 12.30pm-3pm, 19.30pm-11pm; Sat, 12.30pm-3.30pm, 7.30pm-1am;Sun, 12.30pm-3.30pm Reservations: Recommended Best table: By the large windows, watching the boats pass on the River Tagus. Ibo is housed in a former salt warehouse right on the banks of the River Tagus • The best restaurants in Barcelona Avenida da Liberdade JNcQUOI The fashionable restaurant Je Ne Sais Quoi, as it is pronounced, has pride of place on the corner of the capital’s main avenue, with an elegant classical façade topped by a cupola dome. In the basement is the debut of macaron masters Ladurée and a deli bar with fresh oysters, caviar, truffled salami and cocktails. The restaurant is on the ground floor, where a large velociraptor model is the centrepiece of the mirrored and marbled room. It's a prime people watching spot. Order the Iberian pork with rosemary, garlic and chilli or the memorable lobster au gratin and dip into the excellent Portuguese wine list. Contact: 00 351 219 369 900; jncquoi.com Prices: £££ Opening times: 12pm-12am Reservations: Recommended A large velociraptor model is the centrepiece of the mirrored and marbled dining room at JNcQuoi Mouraria Cervejaria Ramiro This much loved restaurant is famous for its fresh seafood and has been going strong for more than 70 years, as its tiled interiors bear witness to, offering an authentic glimpse of a Lisbon of yesteryear. The neighbourhood is named after the Moors who were allowed to live here after the Christian re-conquest of Lisbon in 1147. Step through the doors and you will see giant aquariums with spider crabs, rock lobster and tiger prawns. But start with the house pata negra (smoked ham) or a plate of garlicky clams or goose barnacles and finish with the delicious azeitão cheese. Address: 1 Avenida Almirante Reis Contact: 00 351 218 851 024 Prices: ££ Opening times: Tues-Sun, 12pm-12.30am Reservations: Recommended • The best restaurants in Rio Príncipe Real A Cevicharia In Lisbon’s latest up-and-coming neighbourhood, where streets are lined with faded 19th-century palaces, you can’t miss buzzy A Cevicharia. The doors are always open onto the street, revealing a giant sponge octopus hanging from the ceiling, and a crowd is always milling outside, waiting for a table. Chef Kiko Martins has crafted a short but very sweet menu: highlights include a Portuguese-inspired ceviche, which uses codfish with a chickpea purée, and the potato causa which mixes avocado purée with potatoes in black cuttlefish ink. Leave room for the dulche de leche finale. Contact:00 351 218 038 815; facebook.com/ACevicheriaChefKiko Prices: £ Opening times: Daily, 12pm-12am Reservations: Walk-ins only Try an array of pretty ceviches at A Cevicharia Credit: ©Francisco Rivotti/Francisco Rivotti • The best things to do in Porto Colina Sant'Ana Cave 23 On top of one of Lisbon’s hills, buried in the courtyard of the Torel Palace Hotel, you'll find this hidden gem of a restaurant. Stairs lead down to contemporary interiors which strike the same confident note as the dishes which positively dance out of the kitchen. Bold, innovative flavours draw on the memories and travels of chef Bernardo Agrela, whose passion for his job is tangible on the plate. Try the tiny buns of oxtail with pickles and caramel, a sweet and sour delight, or the scallops with curry and tapioca, and trust the brilliant sommelier with the wine pairing.   Contact: 00 351 218 298 071; cave23.pt Prices: ££ Opening times: Tues-Sat, 8pm-11pm Reservations: Recommended Bold, innovative dishes positively dance out of the kitchen at Cave 23

  • Regensburg cruise port guide
    The Telegraph

    Regensburg cruise port guide

    This charming Unesco World Heritage city, split into two halves by the Danube, is a veritable open-air museum with a dizzying 1,500 listed buildings, some of which date back to Roman times. As well as history and scenery par excellence, it also offers a fabulous array of culture, regional cuisine and even lively nightlife.

  • PR Newswire

    3 Tips For Tackling Holiday Travel During Winter Storm Season

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla., Nov. 20, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Last winter, 24 named winter storms hit the U.S., causing record travel delays and canceling trips around the country. Following the first winter storm of the season, travel insurance comparison site, Squaremouth, breaks down 3 travel insurance tips for travelers ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday. Travel insurance can cover travelers whose trips are impacted by a winter storm, as long as the policy is purchased before the storm was named.

  • Bali resort embraces 'digital detox' trend by banning mobile phone use around swimming pool
    The Independent

    Bali resort embraces 'digital detox' trend by banning mobile phone use around swimming pool

    A Balinese resort has banned the use of mobile phones around one of its pools. Ayana Resort and Spa, a luxury hotel on the southern coast of the Indonesian holiday island, prohibits calls, texts and social media use around its River Pool. The resort says on its website: “The ethos of River Pool is to create a place of tranquillity, where our guests can truly relax and be ‘in the moment’.

  • Are these the 30 most beautiful towns in Europe?
    The Telegraph

    Are these the 30 most beautiful towns in Europe?

    The Japanese Association of Travel Agents (JATA) was challenged to come up with 30 smaller European destinations to promote to holidaymakers. This is what they came up with (and there is only one in Britain). 1. Kilkenny, Ireland On the banks of the River Nore in the province of Leinster, Kilkenny is often referred to as a city though it is the size of a large town. Its heritage is on display in the form of Kilkenny Castle, St Canice’s Cathedral and its medieval walls. Riverside Kilkenny Credit: GETTY 2. Berat, Albania Mangalem, the city of Berat’s old town, sits on the banks of the river Osum and is a Unesco World Heritage Site. In medieval times it was a frontier town of the Byzantine Empire, to which its citadel testifies. Beautiful Berat Credit: GETTY 3. Civita di Bagnoregio, Italy With a permanent population of around 10 people – but 600,000 annual tourists – the hilltop village has become a focal point of central Italian holidays. It is, however, at risk from the steady erosion of its volcanic perch. Italy's most popular ghost town Credit: GETTY 4. Corricella, Italy If the postcard pretty jumble of sun-bleached buildings, steep stone stairways and narrow, arched passages of this fishing village looks familiar, it could be because Corricella was used as a location in both Massimo Troisi’s 1994 film ‘Il Postino’ and Anthony Minghella’s 1999 ‘The Talented Mr. Ripley’. This is the prettiest spot on the unpretentious island of Procida, low-key neighbour of spa-rich Ischia and glitzy Capri. There’s little to do here except watch the boats bobbing in the harbour, sip an Aperol-spritz at one of the waterfront bars or tuck into a plate of spaghetti with sea urchins, a local speciality. 5. Conwy, Wales Conwy was the only UK location to make the JATA list of 30 beautiful European towns and villages. It is dominated by its incredible castle, but there are plenty of other cultural attractions to enjoy too, such as the Royal Cambrian Academy art gallery, Pals Mawr, one of the UK’s finest surviving Elizabethan townhouses, and Aberconwy House, the town’s oldest medieval merchant’s house, dating from around 1300. Conwy Castle Credit: GETTY 6. Lech, Austria A fashionable Austrian ski resort whose charm is often amplified by a covering of snow, Lech is an old farming village set high in a valley that spends large parts of winter cut off from the outside world, until the Flexen Pass can be cleared. The Austrian ski resort Lech Credit: AP 7. Hindeloopen, Netherlands Readers will perhaps have heard of this town in northern Netherlands thanks to the winter ice skating that takes place on the frozen Ijsselmeer inland sea nearby. The old city itself has its own language, a mixture of West Frisian, English, Danish and Norwegian. Hindeloopen in the Netherlands Credit: AP 8. Lefkara, Cyprus Famed for its lace, Lefkara is a village in south Cyprus. According to legend, Leonardo da Vinci visited in 1481, and purchased a lace cloth for the main altar of the Duomo di Milano. 9. Rovinj, Croatia This Istrian gem, just up the coast from Pula, competes with Dubrovnik for the title of Croatia’s most picturesque destination. Jane Foster, our expert, writes: “With its pastel-coloured Venetian-style facades curving round a wide sheltered fishing harbour, backed by a hill crowned with an 18th-century church, it is irresistibly photogenic. Besides its luxury design-conscious hotels, rustic-chic seafood eateries and candlelit cocktail bars, its home to Zlatni Rt, a green peninsular planted with pines, cedars and cypresses, skirted by a coastal path leading to a series of pebbles coves giving onto warm turquoise sea, perfect for bathing.” Lovely Rovinj Credit: GETTY 10. Soglio, Switzerland Austrian painter Giovanni Segantini described Soglio as “the gateway to paradise”. High in the Swiss Alps, the village of 300 is also famous for its flowers – when not coated in snow. Soglio Credit: AP 11. Visby, Sweden On the Swedish island of Gotland, Visby is a popular summer holiday destination for Scandinavians. Explore one of the best preserved medieval towns in Scandinavia, recognised as a Unesco World Heritage Site. A medieval alley in Visby, Sweden Credit: AP 12. Setenil de las Bodegas, Spain Famed for its dwellings built into the rock, Setenil de las Bodegas, 100 miles north-east of Cadiz, has also gained a reputation for its chorizo sausages from pigs bred in the surrounding hills. Setenil de las Bodegas Credit: getty 13. Piran, Slovenia On the Adriatic coast, the Venetian-style town of Piran is a fishing port with exquisite piazzas, churches, labyrinthine streets and fabulous waterfront fish restaurants. Piran 14. Vlkolinec, Slovakia Another Unesco World Heritage Site, this small hamlet is “a remarkably intact settlement of 45 buildings with the traditional features of a central European village,” says Unesco. “It is the region’s most complete group of these kinds of traditional log houses.” Vlkolinec Credit: GETTY 15. Marianske-Lazne, Czech Republic A famous Eastern European spa town is where “famous composers, exhausted intellectuals and jaded aristocrats came to enjoy the restorative treatments and social whirl,” according to Claire Gervat, who visited for Telegraph Travel. 16. Quedlinburg, Germany British writer Simon Winder described Quedlinburg as a “daft little Harz Mountain town” and said that its sheer beauty was never far from his mind. He misses its “rambling street pattern, the beauty of the countless, red-roofed half-timbered houses and, of course, the ‘pocket Schloss’ perched on its hill with a beautiful Romanesque abbey.” Quedlinburg Credit: getty 17. Bernkastel-Kues, Germany A “health resort” recognised by the state, Bernkastle-Kues is also, paradoxically, in the heart of a well-known wine-growing region. Its medieval marketplace is a popular draw, border by gabled timber-frame, 17th century houses. Bernkastel-Kues 18. Golyazi, Turkey Golyazi, an ancient Greek trading city, is on one of the few islands dotted about the waters of Lake Uluabat. Note: The Foreign Office currently advises against all but essential travel to some parts of Turkey and urges caution to those visiting some part of the country, including Istanbul. See gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/turkey for more information. A fisherman on Lake Uluabat in Golyazi Credit: AP 19. Reine, Norway Reine is among the countless pretty ports in the Lofoten Islands. “Others include Nusfjord, Henningsvaer and Kabelvag (which dates back to the ninth century, making it the oldest village above the Arctic Circle),” says Telegraph Travel’s Oliver Smith. “In each one, you can see those classic pyramids of cod drying on wooden racks, and rent cosy, rustic wooden fishermen’s huts, or rorbuer.” Reine Credit: GETTY 20. Sopron, Hungary The site of a diplomatic picnic that helped end communism in Eastern Europe in 1989, Sopron is also home to more than 300 dentists. Now you know. 21. Koprivshtitsa, Bulgaria “It was here that the struggle for independence from the ‘Turkish yoke’ kicked off in 1876, and today Bulgarians recognise its significant place in their history,” wrote Robert Nurden for Telegraph Travel. “This picturesque town of half-timbered buildings, guarding the Sredna Gora Mountains and divided by the meandering River Topolnitsa, hosts important music and folklore festivals.” An old wooden building in Koprivshtitsa Credit: GETTY 22. Porvoo, Finland The second oldest town in Finland, on the coast of the Gulf of Finland, dates back to the early 14th century. Its old district is made up of a pattern of dense, medieval streets and wooden houses. Wooden houses in Porvoo Credit: AP 23. Saint-Cirq-Lapopie, France This village is the Lot’s star turn. “It is so alarmingly perfect that it cannot have emerged, haphazard, from the Middle Ages,” says Anthony Peregrine. “Except that it has. The village is draped over rocks standing proud from the plateau. It marries the contours to the top, where monumental church and castle ruins dominate the valley, as they should. Near vertical streetlets and venerable buildings cram in. Peasants and pageants are but a breath, and aeons, away. Instead, we have artists, restaurants and tourists, which is also pretty good. When writer and founder of surrealism André Breton showed up, post-war, he bought the village’s oldest house immediately. ‘I ceased to wish myself elsewhere,’ he said: as pompous as you’d expect from an anarcho-surrealist, but clear enough.” Saint-Cirq-Lapopie Credit: AP 24. Riquewihr, France A famous part of the Alsace wine-growing region, Riquewihr is “the prettiest village in the region, its medieval defensive walls still largely intact, and many of the half-timbered houses that hem the narrow streets date back to the 16th century,” according to Telegraph Travel’s Nick Trend. The colourful town of Riquewihr Credit: AP 26. Zalipie, Poland This village in southern Poland is best known for its cottages decorated with intricate designs. The custom was reportedly begun by the women of the village more than a century ago. A hand-decorated country house in Zalipie Credit: AP 27. Monsanto, Portugal Monsanto is a mountain-top village in eastern Portugal where the homes were built to coexist with enormous boulders. Some of the rocks form walls and ceilings to various houses, which date back to the 16th century. 28. Ohrid, Macedonia So beautiful is this tiny fragment of Macedonia - with its churches and houses arranged around the edge of Lake Ohrid - that it has been granted Unesco World Heritage status. It is a place to stand, stare, stroll at a slow pace, and soak up the scenery. One of Ohrid's lakeside churches Credit: GETTY 29. Kotor, Montenegro “With its mountainous backdrop, beautiful blue waters and medieval and Venetian-era settlements, butterfly-shaped Kotor Bay is the jewel in Montenegro’s crown,” says Telegraph Travel's Jane Foster. “The walled town of Kotor itself is a wonder of cobbled streets and squares, churches and a lovely museum bearing proud testimony to the region’s seafaring prowess. Farther around the bay, the baroque town of Perast is the site of a famous victory against the Ottomans. From here it is possible to make a very special pilgrimage by boat to the island known as Our Lady of the Rocks: truly a place to inspire princely reflection and a sense of wellbeing.” Kotor, Montenegro Credit: vovik_mar - Fotolia 30. Gura Humorului, Romania In the north of Romania, Gura Humorului is a town nestled in a depression near where the Moldova and Humour Rivers meet, and replete with an array of colourful buildings. A Christian Orthodox church in Gura Humorului in Romania Credit: AP Which do you think is Europe's prettiest town or village? Leave your comments below. 

  • WOW Air sale: Fares drop below $100 one way on Europe flights
    WTSP-TV Tampa

    WOW Air sale: Fares drop below $100 one way on Europe flights

    WOW Air, the Icelandic budget carrier known for $100 one-way fares to Europe, is at it again. WOW's latest sale is pegged to Black Friday, which the airline has dubbed “Purple Friday” in a nod to the distinctive paint scheme it uses for its jets. In the Purple Friday sale, WOW is offering fares as low as $69 one way to Iceland and $99 one way to other cities in Europe.  The $69 and $99 one-way fares are available from five U.S. cities, including one of WOW's West Coast destinations: Los Angeles. Also getting WOW's lowest Purple Friday fares are Boston, Chicago O'Hare, Pittsburgh and St. Louis. Aside from the $69 flights to Iceland, sale fares are available on connecting flights to Amsterdam,

  • Sun, sea and storms – the worst time to visit the world’s most popular holiday destinations
    The Telegraph

    Sun, sea and storms – the worst time to visit the world’s most popular holiday destinations

    Shocking footage emerged from Tenerife over the weekend as powerful storms battered the Canary Islands, creating waves up to 40 feet high.

  • Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Orlando Resort Set to Open in January
    Southern Living

    Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Orlando Resort Set to Open in January

    Anybody got a cheeseburger, because this sounds like paradise.

  • 7 Ways to Use Your American Airlines Miles
    Forbes

    7 Ways to Use Your American Airlines Miles

    Partner flights can be one of the best ways to redeem your American Airlines award miles for maximum value. American Airlines is a part of the Oneworld alliance and has other partnerships, giving your tons of flexibility in how you redeem your miles. Some of their partnerships include luxury airlines Qatar and Etihad, as well as other well-known partners like Cathay Pacific, Japan Airlines, Finnair, and more. But booking partner flights with AA isn't as simple as punching your search into the AA website. Oftentimes, these partners don't show on the American website, so you have to use other airlines' websites to actually search. Up for the challenge? Here are seven ways to use your American Airlines