South China Sea

The South China Sea is a marginal sea that is part of the Pacific Ocean, encompassing an area from the Karimata and Malacca Straits to the Strait of Taiwan of around 3,500,000 square kilometres .
Latest news and discussion about the disputed islands built by China in the South China Sea.
  • Fox News

    US, Britain conduct joint navy drills in South China Sea amid worries about China's military power

    U.S. and British navy ships conducted joint drills in the South China Sea last week in what they called a sign of their shared emphasis on regional peace and stability amid ongoing tensions with China. The Arleigh-Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell and Royal Navy Type 23 frigate GMS Argyll conducted operations in the South China Sea from Jan. 11 to Jan. 16, the U.S. Pacific Fleet said. No joint drills had been conducted in the region since 2010, officials said. “Professional engagement with our British counterparts allows us the opportunity to build upon our existing strong relationships and learn from each other,” Cmdr. Allison Christy, the McCampbell's commanding officer, said

  • A Coming Shift In US Security Policy In The South China Sea? – Analysis
    Eurasia Review

    A Coming Shift In US Security Policy In The South China Sea? – Analysis

    The new movie “Vice” purports to tell the story of former US Vice President Dick Cheney's rise to power and the damage he did to the U.S., other countries, and US standing in the world.  Cheney and his cohorts are depicted as ruthless, reckless, and rapacious in their lust for power and in their use of it to reshape US policy to match their vision. My immediate reaction was: “could 'this' really happen this way?  Wouldn't those around him refuse, object to, or –like Jim Mattis—resign in protest of such deceitful, possibly illegal maneuvers rather than aid and abet them by their silence? Or did they believe– like he did– that the ends justified the means?” Whether fact or fiction, the movie raises

  • The Biggest Problem Between China And The United States Isn't The Trade War
    Forbes

    The Biggest Problem Between China And The United States Isn't The Trade War

    There are many problems between China and the United States, including the potential trade war that has unsettled global financial markets. This isn't the biggest problem between the two countries though. That would be the growing antagonism between the countries and the South China Sea and Africa. This problem could last for years, if not decades, and it could lead to military confrontations between the two countries. The South China Sea is at the forefront of the economic and political agenda in Beijing. It marks the opening of the maritime Silk Road for China, a project that aims to make China the next major economic leader in the world. Roughly $5 trillion of merchandise moves through the

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Recent developments surrounding the South China Sea

    Recent developments surrounding the South China Sea

  • ASEAN ministers rock no boats in Myanmar, South China Sea
    SFChronicle.com

    ASEAN ministers rock no boats in Myanmar, South China Sea

    CHIANG MAI, Thailand (AP) — Foreign ministers of the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations on Friday hewed to the group's practice of reaching the least provocative consensus possible in discussions of such divisive issues as Myanmar's Rohingya crisis and China's territorial claims in the South China Sea. A two-day Foreign Ministers' Retreat was the regional group's first meeting since Thailand took over its annual chairmanship. The host's summary of the meeting emphasized the humanitarian role ASEAN members could play in Myanmar's Rakhine State, where more than 700,000 members of the Muslim Rohingya minority fled from a brutal government counterinsurgency campaign. Standard ASEAN

  • Amid diplomatic row, U.S. Navy chief calls on Japan and South Korea to hold constructive talks
    The Japan Times

    Amid diplomatic row, U.S. Navy chief calls on Japan and South Korea to hold constructive talks

    U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson has called for constructive discussions between Japan and South Korea to improve relations, with a view toward promoting freedom of navigation, as the two countries continue to be at loggerheads over an alleged radar lock-on incident last month. “We continue to encourage all parties to work together” in order to resolve differences, Richardson told media organizations Friday, referring to the relationship among the United States, South Korea and Japan. He expressed hopes for dialogue that will put the three countries “in a unity of effort to promote freedom on the seas.” Such dialogue should be held “to promote long-term healing and reconciliation”