Robots

In a world of sentient robots, striving young inventor Rodney Copperbottom (Ewan McGregor) wants to work for the avuncular Bigweld (Mel Brooks), whose Bigweld Industries makes spare robot parts. But Bigweld has just been deposed as company head by the villainous Phineas T. Ratchet (Greg Kinnear), who wants to make all robots submit to profitable forced upgrades. In this animated adventure, Rodney and his friend Fender (Robin Williams) go underground to fight Ratchet's evil plans.
  • Autonomous drones will help stop illegal fishing in Africa
    Engadget

    Autonomous drones will help stop illegal fishing in Africa

    Drones aren't just cracking down on land-based poaching in Africa -- ATLAN Space is launching a pilot that will use autonomous drones to report illegal fishing in the Seychelles islands. If they detect illegal fishing boats, the drones will note vessel locations, numbering and visible crews, passing the information along to officials. The technology won't be limited to any specific drone system, ATLAN Space added, and that's important for the fishing industry.

  • Udacity's Next Generation Of Machine Learning And Data Science Courses: An Early Review
    Forbes

    Udacity's Next Generation Of Machine Learning And Data Science Courses: An Early Review

    I like to keep regular tabs on the state of data science education in America. As one of the hottest fields in the economy, I find that the quality of data science courses is a leading indicator of the state of online education innovation. So, when I see significant new develops in online education technology, I'll dedicate some time to taking the course (and, selfishly, I like to learn new data skills). One website that I've used before, Udacity, recently launched several new courses on artificial intelligence, machine learning and statistics. I've had mixed experiences with Udacity in the past. I've enjoyed their statistics courses but I found that introductory computer science courses were

  • Robotics-as-a-service is on the way and inVia Robotics is leading the charge
    TechCrunch

    Robotics-as-a-service is on the way and inVia Robotics is leading the charge

    The team at inVia Robotics didn't start out looking to build a business that would create a new kind of model for selling robotics to the masses, but that may be exactly what they've done. After their graduation from the University of Southern California's robotics program, Lior Alazary, Dan Parks, and Randolph Voorhies, were casting around for ideas that could get traction quickly. "Our goal was to get something up and running that could make economic sense immediately,' Voorhies, the company's chief technology officer, said in an interview.

  • Japan set to deploy English-speaking robots to schools: Report
    ZDNet

    Japan set to deploy English-speaking robots to schools: Report

    Japan's Ministry of Education is reportedly planning to place English-speaking robots in schools around the country to help children improve their English oral communication skills. According to a report from Japan's national broadcaster NHK, the ministry will launch the initiative in April in about 500 schools nationwide as part of a trial. It will also make study apps and "online conversation sessions" with native English speakers available to students, the report said. Japan is under pressure to improve the English language skills of elementary school teachers, NHK added, but lacks funding to hire English native speakers in every school, with the rollout of English-speaking robots to provide a cheaper or easier option.

  • Bird Herding Drone
    Bloomberg

    Bird Herding Drone

    Engineers at CalTech developed an algorithm that enables a drone to herd birds away from airports (Source: Bloomberg)

  • Lazy Ants Are Great at Avoiding Traffic Jams
    Popular Mechanics

    Lazy Ants Are Great at Avoiding Traffic Jams

    According to a new study from Georgia Tech, ants are experts at avoiding traffic jams because of an unusual virtue: laziness. Researchers studied groups of fire ants digging tunnels in a lab container, observing that 30 percent of the ants did 70 percent of the work, while the rest lazed around, doing very little. When researchers removed some of the hard-working ants, however, a a selection of loafers took up the work. The idle ants are quite helpful when ants are building nests. Too many ants could potentially clog up the deep end of the tunnel they're digging. But lazy ants turn around and leave right away, limiting the chances of a traffic jam. Researchers discovered that this system of selective