Mental Health

Alabama Department of Mental Health is the state agency responsible for serving Alabama citizens with mental illnesses, intellectual disabilities, and substance use disorders. The department was formally established by ACT 881 in 1965. Annually, ADMH serves every single person in Alabama through a broad network of community mental health services and three state-operated facilities: Bryce Hospital, Mary Starke Harper Geriatric Psychiatry Center, and Taylor Hardin Secure Medical Facility.
Latest news and discussion about mental health awareness.
  • The Common Personality Traits People Wish They Didn't Have
    Psychology Today

    The Common Personality Traits People Wish They Didn't Have

    Although not receiving as much attention as the more flamboyant personality disorders of narcissistic and borderline, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) is actually the most common of all the personality disorders, affecting 5 to 8% of the population. Its symptoms include being overly concerned about money to the point of being cheap, paying extreme attention to detail, working to the point of overwork, and being so perfectionistic and attentive to detail that the person can't get anything done. Perhaps you know someone with OCPD. If you're late, this person becomes enraged. You'll get just as much grief even if you're on time, should you make a mistake in the process of working

  • Coming out about mental health on social media
    medicalxpress.com

    Coming out about mental health on social media

    Susanna Harris was sitting in her lab class for her graduate program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when she received an email that told her she had failed what she describes as "the most important exam in grad school," the doctoral qualifying exam. She took the rest of the day off, went home and baked cookies. Harris continued with her regular schedule: lab, work, home, repeat. Everything seemed fine until she realized she was having a hard time focusing due to lack of sleep. That's when she decided to go to campus health to ask for a prescription for a sleeping aid. The doctor said they could give her a prescription, but it would be for antidepressants instead. Harris was

  • Antidepressant Use Does Not Prevent Suicide, Study Finds
    Mad In America

    Antidepressant Use Does Not Prevent Suicide, Study Finds

    A new study has found that antidepressants are ineffective for reducing suicide attempts. The researchers found that about 20% of participants attempted suicide after being hospitalized for depression, whether they took antidepressants or not. The researchers found a large spike in suicides just after initiating antidepressant use: up to 4 times higher in the month just after first taking an antidepressant than in later months. However, as there was also an increase just before taking an antidepressant, the researchers argue that this spike in suicidality is due to “disease severity” rather than the antidepressant use. The researchers conclude that antidepressants do not reduce suicidality. Merete

  • Daily Mail

    Danny Frawley in his element at coaching clinic days before his tragic death

    New photos have emerged of Danny Frawley at a junior footy clinic just days before his tragic death.  The AFL legend was coaching a group of excited children as he run them through  kicking drills alongside with Hawthorne players Isaac Smith and Liam Shiels.  The former Richmond coach spent four hours laughing and joking with the kids in Hong Kong, just a week before his suspected suicide on September 9.  The former Richmond coach spent four hours laughing and joking with the kids in Hong Kong 'Spud' Frawley was travelling alone at the time of the single-vehicle crash, when the ute he was driving hit a tree near Ballarat, Victoria, about 1.30pm, just a day after his 56th birthday.  He will be

  • One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women

    One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women

    Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. The national study of more than 3,000 women is the first to find that those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely than others to have their first child both earlier in life and outside of marriage – and that those factors were associated with poorer health later in life. The findings have implications for public programs to prevent teen pregnancy, said Kristi Williams, lead author of the study and professor of sociology at The Ohio State University. “It's easy to tell teens that they shouldn't have kids before marriage, but the message won't be effective if they haven't developed the capacity to do that because of trauma they experienced in childhood,” Williams said.

  • Bye, Burnout! Read Chapter 1 of Nicole Lapin's New Book Super Woman: A Simple 12-Step Plan to Go From Burnout to Balance
    PARADE

    Bye, Burnout! Read Chapter 1 of Nicole Lapin's New Book Super Woman: A Simple 12-Step Plan to Go From Burnout to Balance

    Burnout is probably a word you've seen more and more these days. And for good reason. In May 2019,  the World Health Organization redefined burnout as a “syndrome” that is linked to “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” According to a recent Gallup study, two-thirds of full-time employees reported experiencing burnout sometimes or very often on the job. Nicole Lapin, NYT bestselling author and CNBC, Bloomberg and CNN anchor, knows about burnout—and its scary realties. In her new book on sale today, Sept. 17, Becoming Super Woman: A Simple 12-Step Plan to Go from Burnout to Balance, Lapin shares her own story of career burnout, recalling the diagnosis that inspired

  • A Louisville barber is using his chair to help black men soothe their soul
    Louisville Courier-Journal

    A Louisville barber is using his chair to help black men soothe their soul

    Elliott Kelly remembers the first time he witnessed his father show raw emotion. The 21-year-old senior at the University of Louisville was just a kid watching his dad get a haircut when a politician came into the local barbershop and stirred up a conversation that made Kelly's dad so passionate, tears welled in his eyes. Barbershops are one of the few public spaces where black men feel comfortable shedding that armor, which is why they often are fiercely loyal to their barbers, Kelly said as he shook hands with his barber, J. "Divine" Alexander, on the sidewalk outside Campus Barbershop at 1734 S. Fourth St. Divine, who is known for cutting homeless people's hair and giving free haircuts to Jefferson County Public Schools students, is leveraging that client-barber relationship to encourage black men to talk about their feelings.

  • Max Lucado: Does financial security equal personal joy? Here's a secret I need to share
    Fox News

    Max Lucado: Does financial security equal personal joy? Here's a secret I need to share

    Turn on the teleivison or open a paper and the financial news can be unsettling. “A recession is coming!” says one expert. "No recession," argues another. "Save more, spend less, just in case!" cautions a third. And with all the conflicting reports, our joy level sinks lower and lower. But does financial security equal personal joy? Does our economic status serve as an accurate barometer of our happiness level? In a classic study psychologists determined that recent winners of the Illinois State Lottery were no happier than recent accident victims who were consequently disabled. The two groups were asked to “rate the amount of pleasure they got from everyday activities: small but enjoyable things

  • Drugs.com

    Are You Just a Worrywart or Is It Something More?

    TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 -- Everyone goes through moments of worry, but for some people, anxiety takes over their lives. How can you tell if you're an average worrywart or if you might have an anxiety disorder? Your degree of distress is often a good indicator. Normal anxiety typically comes from a specific source of stress, like an upcoming job interview or a fight with your spouse. When the issue is resolved, the anxiety usually eases. With an anxiety disorder, you could be anxious all of the time and worry about everything from money to sexual performance to the well-being of loved ones, often for no good reason. Putting a Name to Your Feelings Excessive worrying is a sign of what's called

  • VivaHealth Magazine Launched, Promises To Serve Readers wWth Vital Health Information
    modernghana.com

    VivaHealth Magazine Launched, Promises To Serve Readers wWth Vital Health Information

    Remex Communications, a full-service digital media agency, last Saturday launched a comprehensive general health magazine with key concentration on mental health. The magazine delivers accurate and trusted information on real life medical challenges and educates readers about the underlying causes of certain medical conditions and how to safeguard against them.

  • Autism findings: Some better at interpreting facial expressions than previously thought
    medicalxpress.com

    Autism findings: Some better at interpreting facial expressions than previously thought

    The ability of people with autism to read what someone is feeling or thinking by looking at their eyes and face may have been underestimated, according to research conducted by a developmental psychology expert from London's Kingston University. Autism is a condition that affects social communication and it is widely believed people on the autism spectrum find reading expressions particularly challenging. Yet a new study by senior lecturer in developmental psychology Dr. Elisa Back, from the University's Faculty of Business and Social Sciences, suggests this is not always the case. The findings have important implications for healthcare and education professionals working with children and young

  • Is it even possible to connect '13 Reasons Why' to teen suicide?
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Is it even possible to connect '13 Reasons Why' to teen suicide?

    (The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Emily Lund, University of Alabama and Michael R. Nadorff, Mississippi State University (THE CONVERSATION) Netflix recently released the third season of “13 Reasons Why,” and the Salt Lake City school district has already sent home a letter to parents imploring them to discourage their children from watching the show. In season one, which was released in 2017, the protagonist died by suicide. Since then, studies have emerged about the effects of the show, and media has tended to cover the findings with alarmist headlines. In response to public anxiety, Netflix edited out the original

  • Personalised VR technology could improve and maintain positive mental health and well-being
    medicalxpress.com

    Personalised VR technology could improve and maintain positive mental health and well-being

    Personalised virtual reality (VR) technology that enables new forms of self-reflection could improve and maintain positive mental health. As well as helping with better mental health, this approach could also be beneficial for people in the early stages of dementia, those receiving end-of-life care and those with addiction problems or long-term physical conditions. Around one in four UK adults has a mental health condition, with depression and anxiety being the most common. Dr. Chris Blackmore, from the Mental Health Research Unit at the University of Sheffield's School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), said: "With more people seeking help with mental health problems, and increasing pressure on existing services, new ways of intervening faster and more effectively to help people are needed, and the use of new technology is one way of improving care; making it more personalized and engaging.

  • Expert discusses surprising findings linking PTSD treatment with lower diabetes risk
    medicalxpress.com

    Expert discusses surprising findings linking PTSD treatment with lower diabetes risk

    University of Virginia professor and clinical psychologist Peter Tuerk and his colleagues at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and the National Center for PTSD were surprised at the size of their findings. Could people who improved their post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms really have lessened their risk for developing Type 2 diabetes about 50 percent, as the study seemed to indicate? Earlier this week, UVA Today caught up with Tuerk, a professor of education in the Curry School of Education and Human Development and director of the school's Sheila C. Johnson Center for Clinical Services, to take a deeper dive into the study. Q. What did you learn about the relationship between PTSD improvement and Type 2 diabetes?