Medical services

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), previously known as the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), is a federal agency within the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that administers the Medicare program and works in partnership with state governments to administer Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and health insurance portability standards.
  • GlobeNewswire

    Nuance Introduces AI-Powered, Cloud-Based Clinical Documentation Excellence Product Suite at AHIMA ‘18

    MIAMI, Sept. 24, 2018-- Today, at the American Health Information Management Association Convention and Exhibit, Nuance Communications, Inc. introduced and demonstrated Nuance CDE One, and other new clinical ...

  • Dozens of medical groups join forces to improve diagnoses
    KWWL Iowa

    Dozens of medical groups join forces to improve diagnoses

    (HealthDay News) -- Every nine minutes, a patient in a U.S. hospital dies because a diagnosis was wrong or delayed -- resulting in 80,000 deaths a year. That sobering estimate comes from the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM). To help remedy this situation, more than 40 health care and patient advocacy groups have joined forces to improve the quality of diagnoses, especially those that can result in patient harm. The effort is called ACT for Better Diagnosis. "Providing an accurate medical diagnosis is complex and involves uncertainty, but it's obviously essential to effective and timely treatment," Paul Epner, chief executive officer and co-founder of SIDM, said in a statement.

  • The Economic Times

    Doctors clueless about Ayushman Bharat a km away from launch function in Lucknow

    LUCKNOW: Just a kilometre away from Indira Gandhi Pratisthan in Lucknow where the PM Jan Arogya Yojana-Ayushman Bharat scheme is launched at a grand function by Uttar Pradesh Governor Ram Naik on Sunday, a doctor handling patients at 'Critical Care Unit' of the government-run Ram Manohar Lohia (RML) Combined Hospital draws a blank when asked about the scheme. “We have no information on this,” he says. There is not a single banner or hoarding of the scheme at this hospital or at the adjoining Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, forget an 'Ayushman Bharat' kiosk or 'Ayushman Mitras', who are supposed to guiding patients. “Ayushman Bharat? There is a PM Jan Ayushdi Kendra…Are you talking

  • N.J. needs to allow the terminally ill the right to a peaceful death
    NJ.com

    N.J. needs to allow the terminally ill the right to a peaceful death

    Supporters of a long-overdue piece of legislation designed to give terminally ill patients the right to a peaceful death will be out in force later this month. They will come Trenton to urge their representatives in the state Assembly to act - finally - on the Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act, a measure New Jersey residents support by an overwhelming margin. We hope their pleas, heartfelt and in many cases stemming from personal experience with a loved one, find a receptive ear. The bill, which passed the Assembly's Judiciary Committee in March with a 5-2 vote, has not had an easy journey. The lawmakers first considered a so-called physician-assisted suicide bill way back in their 2012-2013

  • N.J. needs to allow the terminally ill the right to a peaceful death
    NJ.com

    N.J. needs to allow the terminally ill the right to a peaceful death

    Supporters of a long-overdue piece of legislation designed to give terminally ill patients the right to a peaceful death will be out in force later this month. They will come Trenton to urge their representatives in the state Assembly to act - finally - on the Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act, a measure New Jersey residents support by an overwhelming margin. We hope their pleas, heartfelt and in many cases stemming from personal experience with a loved one, find a receptive ear. The bill, which passed the Assembly's Judiciary Committee in March with a 5-2 vote, has not had an easy journey. The lawmakers first considered a so-called physician-assisted suicide bill way back in their 2012-2013

  • Physician burnout common in Florida, U.S., survey finds
    Orlando Sentinel

    Physician burnout common in Florida, U.S., survey finds

    As many as 80 percent of Florida physicians have experienced burnout at some point in their career, according to a recent survey by the national nonprofit Physicians Foundation. Although slightly higher than the national average, the startling statistic isn't unique to Florida. Burnout is something that three in four U.S. physicians have experienced, according to findings of the sixth Survey of America's Physicians, which is conducted every other year. A perfect storm of physician job dissatisfaction, a growing aging population, the increasing number of people with chronic diseases like obesity, the opioid epidemic and the continuing physician shortage may be putting today's physician under enormous

  • Nurses in D.C.'s 911 center are helping cut some unnecessary ambulance runs, but not most
    Washington Post

    Nurses in D.C.'s 911 center are helping cut some unnecessary ambulance runs, but not most

    D.C. Fire and EMS officials found positive signs in the first 90 days of a $1 million nursing phone line at the 911 call center, but have yet to see big dividends in one of the program's intended goals: reducing ambulance trips for patients who don't need them. D.C. Fire Chief Gregory Dean sent a letter to the department this month highlighting early data from the “Right Care, Right Now” program that staffs a triage line at the 911 center with registered nurses. The nurses are there to diagnose callers who appear to have nonlife-threatening maladies or injuries and may not need medics or a fire crew and a trip to the emergency room. The fledgling program has been providing quick, private transportation for noncritical patients to clinics using a ride-share service, Dean's letter said, and 911 callers who were processed through the nurse gave uniformly positive reviews about their experience in follow-up surveys.

  • Primary Care Doctors Less Familiar With Vaginal Atrophy
    Medscape

    Primary Care Doctors Less Familiar With Vaginal Atrophy

    (Reuters Health) - Postmenopausal women who experience problems like vaginal dryness, painful intercourse or urinary incontinence may want to see a gynecologist instead of a primary care provider for help, a recent study suggests. That's because gynecologists may be more knowledgeable about vulvovaginal atrophy, a common but often overlooked condition that can seriously impact women's lives after menopause and lead to avoidance of intimacy, loss of libido, and painful sex. For the study, researchers asked 90 primary care providers and 29 gynecologists multiple choice questions about how to recognize vulvovaginal atrophy and surveyed participants about how often they assessed patients for these

  • Tufton promises improvements in delivery of maternal care; childcare
    The Jamaica Observer

    Tufton promises improvements in delivery of maternal care; childcare

    Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton says the Government has made significant strides in strengthening the delivery of maternal care and childcare under the Programme for the Reduction of Maternal and Child Mortality (PROMAC). Dr Tufton was addressing a recent ceremony at the Bustamante Hospital for Children in St Andrew, to mark the breaking of ground for construction of a high-dependency unit (HDU) at the facility, in addition to Victoria Jubilee, St Andrew; and Cornwall Regional, St James. The health minister, meanwhile, said investments have been made in building the capacity of healthcare professionals, citing the award of scholarships for studies at the University of the West Indies (UWI).

  • Even as the US grows more diverse, the medical profession is slow to follow
    Houston Chronicle

    Even as the US grows more diverse, the medical profession is slow to follow

    I've never cared for a Hmong child, but I often think about what it would be like. The summer before we started medical school, I and other students were advised to read Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down." The book chronicles the illness of Lia Lee, a Hmong girl with severe epilepsy, and her family's saga navigating the American medical system. The Hmong come from Southeast Asia. The story has become a symbol of the sometimes devastating consequences of a cultural divide - a cautionary tale of miscommunication, misperception and mistrust, culminating in a catastrophic two-hour seizure and permanent brain damage. Lia died in 2012, after living the last 26 years of her life

  • Catholic Bishops Conference Gives Plans To Fight Abuse In The Church
    Yahoo View

    Catholic Bishops Conference Gives Plans To Fight Abuse In The Church

    The bishops say they'll create a third-party reporting system for fielding complaints, among other things.