Louisville, Ky.

Louisville is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 29th most-populous city in the United States. It is one of two cities in Kentucky designated as first-class, the other being Lexington, the state's second-largest city. Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County, located in the northern region of the state, on the border with Indiana.
  • Daily Journal

    Major tracks to ban race-day use of anti-bleeding medication

    ARCADIA, Calif. — All three sites of the Triple Crown are among several major tracks that have agreed to phase out the use of a common anti-bleeding medication starting next year. Starting in 2020, 2-year-old horses won't be allowed to be treated with the drug Lasix within 24 hours of racing. Lasix is a diuretic given to a majority of horses on race days to prevent pulmonary bleeding. In 2021, the same prohibition would extend to all horses running in any stakes race at tracks in the coalition that announced the ban Thursday. That's the year the Triple Crown would be run for the first time under the new medication rules. Churchill Downs, Pimlico and Belmont are the hosts for the Triple Crown

  • More suburban fire districts have ambulance services. But can they?
    Louisville Courier-Journal

    More suburban fire districts have ambulance services. But can they?

    A wave of fire departments across suburban Jefferson County have gotten the rights to own and operate ambulances in recent years, responding to what they say is a clear need in their communities.  First there was only Anchorage, which has operated one for decades. Then, St. Matthews. Harrods Creek and Jeffersontown came soon after. Buechel and Eastwood followed. Now, Fern Creek and Okolona are pursuing their own, and a proposed merger between four East End fire districts could mean even more residents are served by ambulances not operated by Louisville Metro Emergency Medical Services.  But amid this wave, some are raising questions about the trend's legality. The union that represents EMS workers,

  • Google will pay Louisville $4 million to repair roads after Fiber exit
    Engadget

    Google will pay Louisville $4 million to repair roads after Fiber exit

    Google Fiber service ended in Louisville this week following a number ofissues, including exposed cables