Health Care Policy

Health Affairs is a peer-reviewed healthcare journal established in 1981 by John K. Iglehart; since 2014, the editor-in-chief is Alan Weil. It was described by The Washington Post as "the bible of health policy".
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  • Obamacare small-business exchange insurance premiums to rise 4.6 percent
    SFChronicle.com

    Obamacare small-business exchange insurance premiums to rise 4.6 percent

    Health insurance premiums for 5,700 small businesses in California — which employ roughly 47,000 workers — will go up 4.6 percent in 2019, Covered California announced Thursday. The increase applies to the small slice of California companies and workers that get their health insurance from Covered California for Small Business, the exchange created under the Affordable Care Act where companies with 100 or fewer workers can buy health plans for their employees. Most of the state's small businesses buy health insurance directly from insurance companies or from other exchanges including Cal Choice. But the creation of California's small-business exchange gave employers more choices of health plans

  • Safe NHS staffing bill `can´t magically create nurses´
    Daily Mail

    Safe NHS staffing bill `can´t magically create nurses´

    A planned new law to ensure safe staffing levels in the NHS “can't magically create nurses” in the face of a recruitment crisis, MSPs have heard. Karen Hedge, national director of Scottish Care which represents independent health and social care providers, said there is a “huge crisis” in staffing currently, leading to payments of up to £1,200 for a night's agency nurse cover. “For nurses in particular the vacancy rate is currently sitting at 32%. It can't continue… 19 care homes have closed this year because they can't recruit nurses,” she told Holyrood's Health Committee. “We're really, really struggling to recruit staff. “Because of the 32% vacancy rate for nurses you'll see there's a growth

  • New Ideas Not Medicaid Will Create a Healthy Georgia
    East Cobb, GA Patch

    New Ideas Not Medicaid Will Create a Healthy Georgia

    Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare could not force states to expand their Medicaid programs, there has been a relentless campaign to get Georgia to reverse course and add more patients to the 53-year-old government plan. If you are a Medicaid patient and need a specialist to monitor your diabetes, high blood pressure or heart condition, for example, it's often more difficult to find a physician who will take Medicaid than someone with private insurance, Medicare or even Obamacare. As a result, Medicaid patients often have worse healthcare outcomes as they let conditions escalate and wind up in the emergency room for treatment. If the goal is to provide better healthcare for Georgians, especially in rural parts of the state, then we need to stop relying on a failed government program and look to 21st Century ideas to offer new healthcare options to those who need it.

  • Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek
    CBS Philadelphia

    Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek

    Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek

  • Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek
    CBS Philadelphia

    Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek

    Police: 17-Year-Old Dead Following Shooting In Cobbs Creek

  • New US survey shows some progress against opioid crisis
    Daily Mail

    New US survey shows some progress against opioid crisis

    Figures from a U.S. government survey released Friday show some progress in the fight against the ongoing opioid addiction crisis with fewer people in 2017 using heroin for the first time compared to the previous year. The number of new users of heroin decreased from 170,000 in 2016 to 81,000 in 2017, a one-year drop that would need to be sustained for years to reduce the number of fatal overdoses, experts said. Fewer Americans are misusing or addicted to prescription opioid painkillers. And more people are getting treatment for heroin and opioid addiction, the survey found. The Trump administration said the positive trends show government efforts are working. Messages are reaching people about

  • Cancer survivors Evers, Kleefisch clash over health care
    The Sacramento Bee

    Cancer survivors Evers, Kleefisch clash over health care

    MADISON, Wis. Democratic candidate for governor Tony Evers and Republican Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, both cancer survivors, clashed Friday over protections for people like them with pre-existing conditions. Kleefisch is featured in a new television ad in which she says as long as she and Gov. Scott Walker are in office, people with pre-existing conditions will be guaranteed health insurance. That protection is extended under former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, which Walker has been working for years to repeal. He signed off on Attorney General Brad Schimel joining a multi-state lawsuit this year that seeks to undo the law and the pre-existing conditions protection. But Walker

  • I'm dying of ALS, here's why health care will decide my last vote
    The Hill

    I'm dying of ALS, here's why health care will decide my last vote

    I am dying from ALS — a disease that affects the nervous system by weakening muscles and impacts my physical functions — and over the summer, I spent some of the last few months of my life traveling from coast to coast to tell my story and speak about why the fight our health care is so important. I'm outspoken about my personal life now, but that has not always been the case. Before October of 2016, I was living a regular life with my wife and son, but as is the case for many Americans, a medical emergency changed everything for us. From day one, my doctors have been clear with me. My ALS diagnosis means I don't have much more time left to live — and although I want to spend as much of that

  • Maryland suit seeks to protect US health law from 'sabotage'
    Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune

    Maryland suit seeks to protect US health law from 'sabotage'

    BALTIMORE — Maryland's attorney general has filed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump's administration for efforts he says are intended to undercut the nation's health care law. The lawsuit filed in federal court Thursday is the latest in a broad effort by attorneys general in various U.S. states pushing back against a "sabotage" of the Affordable Care Act following years of failed GOP attempts to fully repeal the Obama-era law. Attorney General Brian Frosh is seeking a declaratory judgment in U.S. District Court that ACA is constitutional. He says the Trump administration's "attempts to sabotage this life-saving law and jeopardize the health of Marylanders who rely on it cannot stand."

  • Free care for elderly pledged by Gething
    BBC News

    Free care for elderly pledged by Gething

    Elderly people could be entitled to free care funded by a new tax under proposals from a Welsh Labour leadership candidate. Vaughan Gething said he would establish a national care service if he became the next first minister. He said social care for older people faced "huge challenges" which "will only get worse if we don't act". The scheme would be run by councils and would "preferably" be funded by a social care levy, his campaign said. Trade union Unison has warned Wales' care home system is in "crisis", with figures suggesting concerns flagged to inspectors have quadrupled since 2010. The proposal promises "the highest standard of care" free at the point of use. Older people would be entitled

  • Of Course Russian Trolls Used Obamacare Repeal To Divide Americans
    The Federalist

    Of Course Russian Trolls Used Obamacare Repeal To Divide Americans

    On Wednesday, the Wall Street Journal published an analysis of nearly 10,000 tweets published by accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency (IRA), a Russian-backed organization that Special Counsel Robert Mueller indicted for its attempts to interfere with the American electoral process. The analysis, undertaken by researchers at Clemson University, found that just under two-thirds (63 percent) of the health care-related tweets trolled for Republican causes—that is, opposing Obamacare or supporting its repeal—while one-sixth (16 percent) trolled for Democratic ones, by supporting the law and opposing “repeal-and-replace” efforts last year. It should go without saying, but no one should support efforts to interfere with, or otherwise corrupt, the American democratic process. Particularly given the way in which Russia's authoritarian regime has stifled dissent and dismantled the country's free and independent media, the IRA and Russian President Vladimir Putin have little business trying to lecture the United States on how to run a government.