Health Care Policy

Health Affairs is a peer-reviewed healthcare journal established in 1981 by John K. Iglehart; since 2014, the editor-in-chief is Alan Weil. It was described by The Washington Post as "the bible of health policy".
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  • Honduran boy ‘didn’t recognise parents’ after being separated from them at Texas border
    The Independent

    Honduran boy ‘didn’t recognise parents’ after being separated from them at Texas border

    After being separated from his parents five months on the US-Mexico border, a 15-month-old boy did not immediately recognise his parents when reunited in Honduras. Johan Bueso Montecitos had been separated from father Rolando Bueso Castillo in Texas this past March as part of the Trump administration's “zero tolerance” immigration policy which put undocumented immigrants in detention facilities away from their children, though many had crossed the border seeking asylum. The baby had been placed in a facility in Arizona and remained there after Mr Castillo was deported back to his native Honduras.

  • One letter reveals what ails health care
    The Des Moines Register

    One letter reveals what ails health care

    About 600,000 poor or disabled Iowans have their health care covered by Medicaid, which has been managed by for-profit companies since 2016. The caregivers in our union at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) got an ominous letter in the mail late last month. You can see it by scrolling to the bottom of this piece. It ordered them to send documents proving the identity of their spouses and children on the hospital's health insurance plan. If they fail to do so, their loved ones' coverage will be cut off. The letter came from an outside consulting firm called HMS, which bills itself as a leader in health care “cost containment.” But this isn't cost containment, it's cost shifting.

  • markets.businessinsider.com

    Dual Eligible Population Enrolled In Medicaid Managed Care Nearly Doubled Since 2011 – OPEN MINDS Releases 2018 Update On Dual Eligible Financing

    Gettysburg, PA, July 19, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A new report from OPEN MINDS found that 40% of full-benefit dual eligibles were enrolled in Medicaid managed care in 2017; a rapid increase from 2011, when 24% of the population was enrolled in Medicaid managed care. While national trends show a consistent push towards managed care for this population, there is a wide variation in state's policies for financing models for the dual eligible population. Dual eligibles are enrolled in only fee-for-service (FFS) systems in twelve states; dual eligibles are enrolled in only managed care systems in three states; and dual eligibles have a choice to enroll in one or more financing systems in thirty-six

  • Nancy Pelosi pushes for national health care plan during Milwaukee visit
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Nancy Pelosi pushes for national health care plan during Milwaukee visit

    Defending the Affordable Care Act and saying that a Medicare for All program ought to be considered, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi campaigned for Democratic Congresswoman Gwen Moore in Milwaukee Saturday.  Pelosi spoke to a group of about 75 people at Independence First, a resource center for people with disabilities located on the city's south side. Moore was not there because she had an unexpected medical issue, one of the event's speakers told the group. Pelosi, minority leader of the U.S. House of Representatives since 2011, whose district includes San Francisco, has been an advocate for government-paid health care. "Our goal has always been to expand coverage and to do so in a way that

  • U.S. Medigap Plans Fall Short on Protections for Pre-Existing Conditions
    Medscape

    U.S. Medigap Plans Fall Short on Protections for Pre-Existing Conditions

    (The opinions expressed here are those of the author, a columnist for Reuters.) CHICAGO (Reuters) - Thinking of adding a Medigap supplemental policy to your Medicare coverage? Beware: you could be charged higher rates or be turned away completely if you have a pre-existing condition. Medigap policies fill gaps in coverage for people enrolled in traditional fee-for-service Medicare, such as copays, deductibles and limits on hospitalization benefits. The plans are sold by commercial insurance companies. Federal law provides limited protection against medical underwriting by insurers - the practice of using health information when evaluating an application for coverage. And some states regulate

  • Will Southern voters be swayed by Democrats' health care attacks on GOP?
    McClatchy Washington Bureau

    Will Southern voters be swayed by Democrats' health care attacks on GOP?

    In southern states where Republican opposition to Obamacare has been strongest, Democrats are using heightened concerns about healthcare to woo undecided voters and challenge GOP candidates who don't support the Affordable Care Act and its key provisions. After Republicans ran against the ACA to regain control of the House in 2010, Democrats were reluctant to embrace Obamacare as polls showed only lukewarm partisan support for the health law. But as the law's popularity grew, Democrats saw an opportunity to fight GOP repeal efforts. The Republican effort to dismantle Obamacare has continued. Nine GOP-led southern states are part of a 20-state federal lawsuit that seeks to declare the ACA unconstitutional

  • Cost of Individual Health Insurance Depends More Than Ever On Where You Live
    ConsumerReports.org

    Cost of Individual Health Insurance Depends More Than Ever On Where You Live

    While the Trump administration continues to use its regulatory and legal powers to reshape the Affordable Care Act (ACA), states are making their own moves to protect or expand their insurance ma...

  • Republicans are bringing back the real 'death panels'
    Chicago Tribune

    Republicans are bringing back the real 'death panels'

    Sarah Palin burnished her reputation as a supremely ignorant commentator on public issues with her false assertion that the Affordable Care Act would create “death panels.” To the contrary, one of the principal objectives of the ACA was to remove the de factodeath panels” that had long pervaded the health care insurance industry. These “death panels” were the actuaries who determined whether people with pre-existing conditions could get any health care insurance at all (outside of big company group plans for employees) or whether they should be required to pay exorbitant, and essentially unaffordable, premiums to get limited health care coverage. The insurance company actuarial decisions were

  • Overnight Health Care: Trump officials score a win against Planned Parenthood
    The Hill

    Overnight Health Care: Trump officials score a win against Planned Parenthood

    Welcome to today's All-Star edition of Overnight Health Care. If you're reading this while waiting in line to get into Nats Park, we hope you managed to stay dry through the deluge. In today's news, Idaho will vote on Medicaid expansion and hospitals lost a key court case in a fight with the pharmaceutical industry over a drug discount program. But first: The Trump administration scores a win against Planned Parenthood. A federal judge ruled in favor of the Trump administration -- and against Planned Parenthood -- in a lawsuit over changes to a government-funded family planning program. Planned Parenthood sought to have the changes thrown out, arguing they are unlawful because the administration

  • Los Angeles Times

    Democrats wrestle with election-year message on health care

    Cheered on by a handful of activists, liberal House Democrats announced outside the Capitol that they were forming a caucus to push for " Medicare for All" — shorthand for government-financed health care. At the same time Thursday, Democratic senators were introducing a resolution aimed at putting Republicans on the defensive about Trump administration efforts to undermine former President Barack Obama 's health care law.

  • Lefty Think Tank Admits Obamacare Failed, Recommends Doubling Down
    The Federalist

    Lefty Think Tank Admits Obamacare Failed, Recommends Doubling Down

    Once again, the movement to expand government-run health care continues apace. No sooner had one think tank published a paper calling for the return of an individual mandate at the federal level than the liberal Commonwealth Fund published a paper, released on Friday, calling for states to impose their own Obamacare-style mandates at the state level. However, the paper proves most interesting for what it tacitly admits. Over time, Commonwealth believes that more and more people will purchase coverage solely due to a government order—because health costs and premiums will continue to rise. Because Obamacare failed to control health costs, more and more individuals will purchase health coverage

  • Fox Business

    Here’s what the Trump administration has done so far to lower drug prices

    Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said the Trump administration has taken several steps to lower the cost of prescription drugs.