Family health

Family medicine (FM), formerly family practice (FP), is a medical specialty devoted to comprehensive health care for people of all ages; the specialist is named a family physician or family doctor. In Europe the discipline is often referred to as general practice and a practitioner as a General Practice Doctor or GP; this name emphasises the holistic nature of this speciality, as well as its roots in the family.
Latest news and discussion about family health.
  • 'Miracle Baby' Made History For Weighing Less Than 1 Pound And 15 Years Later She's Thriving
    LittleThings.com

    'Miracle Baby' Made History For Weighing Less Than 1 Pound And 15 Years Later She's Thriving

    Eric and Tammy Koz desperately wanted a baby, but Tammy's lupus diagnosis contributed to her heartbreaking miscarriage in 2003. The couple was elated to learn they were pregnant again, and everything was going smoothy — until 19 weeks when an ultrasound showed their terrifying reality. Zoe was incredibly tiny and underweight, and not growing properly in the womb. Doctors were so concerned that they gave Tammy and Eric a choice: either “cut their losses” deliver the baby with almost no chance of her surviving or try and make it to 27 weeks pregnant. Even then, the chances of Zoe's survival were slim-to-none. The birth would even put Tammy's life at risk. But the couple decided to try and make

  • What Does Being Pregnant Feel Like? Part IV
    The Cut

    What Does Being Pregnant Feel Like? Part IV

    “Once I crossed some sort of medical threshold of birth security, I felt expansive and powerful.”

  • What No One Tells You About Not Being Able to Breastfeed
    The Cut

    What No One Tells You About Not Being Able to Breastfeed

    We’re told that every woman who tries hard enough can do it, but that’s far from accurate.

  • The ever-rising cost of long-term care insurance
    CBS News

    The ever-rising cost of long-term care insurance

    Long-term care insurance seemed like such a great idea. Buy a policy when you're in your 50s or 60s, while you're still relatively healthy, pay your monthly premiums and in return you'll have help managing the astronomical costs of a nursing home, assisted-living facility or personal aide when the time comes. This insurance was not only supposed to help you afford quality care, but it also was supposed to help protect your nest egg and legacy. You wouldn't have to spend all your hard-earned retirement savings on getting old. But long-term care insurance hasn't exactly worked out that way. The past few years have brought sky-high premium increases for most policyholders. In some cases, premium

  • Rainbow babies: Families find hope, love after losing baby
    Khou

    Rainbow babies: Families find hope, love after losing baby

    They say a picture is worth a thousand words. For the Shipley's, few precious images are worth more than words can describe. “I had never done a newborn photoshoot before so I was open to it,” said Kaisey Shipley. “So that's really why we're here- to celebrate our little miracle.” That miracle is Millie -- born on April 5 which previously had been a darker day for the family. “We had a stillborn two years ago exactly on her birthday,” Kaisey said. The mother had experienced two miscarriages before Millie's arrival. “We thought we're done, no more, we're not going to put ourselves through this again,” Kaisey recalled. “We don't want to chance having this trauma again, but we got a little miracle

  • Infant health deserves careful research
    Detroit News

    Infant health deserves careful research

    Want to win a political argument? Accuse your opponent of hurting children.   That's the lesson behind two recent studies regarding the well-being of America's babies. A new report from the United Nations Children's Fund finds that America's infant mortality rate is only slightly better than Sri Lanka's.  The left seized this finding to call for single-payer health care.  Another recent analysis suggests that fracking -- the drilling method that extracts natural gas and oil from shale rock -- can harm babies in the womb. In both cases, the critical issue of infant health is being used to advance a political agenda. But both analyses are methodologically flawed and do more to obscure the truth

  • New Book Explores The Science Of Pregnancy 'Like A Mother'
    NPR.org

    New Book Explores The Science Of Pregnancy 'Like A Mother'

    TERRY GROSS, HOST: This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. After giving birth to her first daughter, my guest, journalist Angela Garbes, started breastfeeding. She'd been told by medical professionals, books and friends that breast is best, but she didn't understand what was so special about breast milk. So she did some research and wrote an article for the weekly Seattle paper The Stranger, where she was a food writer. What she learned about breast milk amazed her, and it amazed readers, too. The piece went viral. That led her to do further investigation into pregnancy and childbirth. Now she has a new book, called, "Like A Mother: A Feminist Journey Through The Science And Culture Of Pregnancy."

  • California's First Accredited Senior ER Comes to La Jolla
    La Jolla, CA Patch

    California's First Accredited Senior ER Comes to La Jolla

    The Gary and Mary West Emergency Department at UC San Diego Health in La Jolla has been accredited as a geriatric emergency department by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The accreditation is the first of its kind and is part of an effort to improve the quality and standards of emergency care provided to the nation's older patients. It builds upon the foundational work and support of the Gary and Mary West Health Institute and The John A. Hartford Foundation to enhance geriatric emergency care across the country. "This recognition is an acknowledgement of the superior, tailored care we provide to any senior who arrives in our emergency department," said Vaishal Tolia, MD, MPH, FACEP, medical director of the Emergency Department at UC San Diego Health and director of the Gary and Mary West Senior Emergency Care Unit at Jacobs Medical Center.

  • Mexico stumbles in race against global obesity time-bomb
    reuters.com

    Mexico stumbles in race against global obesity time-bomb

    MEXICO CITY (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Children at school already mock six-year-old Yatzyri by calling her “fatty”, fuelling her mother Ana Laura Martinez's worries about her daughter's health if does not lose about 16 kg (35lb). As Yatzyri fidgeted with a large pink hair bow, Martinez explained that tests so far have shown no signs of the 38 kg child having the illness that plagues her family - and ranks as Mexico's biggest killer - type 2 diabetes. “I'm diabetic. My dad died very young of diabetes at 39, my grandmother also died, my mother has it, my brother has it. It's something in the family,” said Martinez, in the obesity clinic at the Federico Gomez Children's Hospital. “She needs

  • Austin mother warns others after near death experience during childbirth
    Khou

    Austin mother warns others after near death experience during childbirth

    An Austin mother nearly lost her life after complications during pregnancy and childbirth. Thirty-seven-year-old Leah Bahrenru shared her story with the crowd that showed up for the Promise Walk for Preeclampsia at Dick Nichols Park in South Austin on Sunday. The mother of twins said looking back, she wished she would have spoken up about her symptoms. "My organs were failing when I went in to go get checked," recalled Bahrencu. At the time, Bahrencu didn't know she had HELLP syndrome, a life threatening pregnancy complication. Symptoms of HELLP syndrome include nausea, headache, belly pain and swelling. HELLP stands Hemolysis elevated liver enzymes and low platelets. At just 34 weeks, she was

  • Woman says she delivered her baby in jail cell after jailers said she was faking labor
    Citizen Times

    Woman says she delivered her baby in jail cell after jailers said she was faking labor

    A woman says she delivered her premature baby in her jail cell after guards ignored her screams for help, accusing her of faking her labor. DALLAS — A woman, who was five months pregnant, said officials at a Texas jail ignored her repeated pleas for help while she was in labor last week, which resulted in her giving birth to her son alone in jail cell.  "I delivered a 1-pound, 2-ounce baby in that single cell screaming for hours, begging them to come and help me," said Shaye Bear. "The guards would walk by and tell me they wouldn't do nothing for me until I had that baby in that cell." Bear, 25, was in an Ellis County, Texas, jail Thursday when she went into labor. “I had my baby in my hands,”

  • This Incredibly Sad Statistic About IVF Proves Why It's Unattainable For So Many People
    PopSugar

    This Incredibly Sad Statistic About IVF Proves Why It's Unattainable For So Many People

    Approximately 12 percent of women in the US have or will have some trouble getting pregnant. But despite infertility affecting so many women, great strides have also been made in the advancement of assisted reproductive technology (ART), such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF).