Education

Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational.
  • Magic Software Inc. Announces Partnership With Instructure for Interoperable and Accessible Learning Solutions
    CNW Group

    Magic Software Inc. Announces Partnership With Instructure for Interoperable and Accessible Learning Solutions

    NEW YORK , July 18, 2018 /CNW/ - Magic Edtech (A division of Magic Software Inc.) is a leading services provider to the global education community to support development of their eLearning content and enable platform integrations. Magic Edtech recently announced a partnership with Instructure, Inc. (INST) to integrate with and offer content services for their industry-leading LMS platform Canvas in the US as well as in the UK. Ensuring an accessible and pleasant experience to all users, regardless of disability, is a key focus of Canvas, which will help Magic's initiative in building learning experiences that works for all.

  • Axalta, the Philadelphia Eagles and Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers with a Day of STEM in the Stream
    PR Newswire

    Axalta, the Philadelphia Eagles and Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers with a Day of STEM in the Stream

    PHILADELPHIA, July 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Axalta (AXTA), a leading global supplier of liquid and powder coatings headquartered in Philadelphia, the World Champion Philadelphia Eagles, and Stroud Water Research Center hosted a day of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning in White Clay Creek for recipients of Axalta's All-Pro Teachers designation – a program in conjunction with the Eagles that identifies, recognizes and rewards innovative STEM-focused teachers and their schools in the greater Philadelphia area.

  • UC regents to vote on first tuition decrease in nearly 20 years
    latimes.com

    UC regents to vote on first tuition decrease in nearly 20 years

    UC regents, who begin their two-day meeting Wednesday in San Francisco, plan to vote on an $8.7-billion spending plan for 2018-19 that includes the first tuition decrease in nearly 20 years. The proposed $60 decrease — the result of eliminating a surcharge added in 2007 to pay for legal bills — would bring down base tuition and fees to $12,570 annually.

  • Office Depot Unveils Hot New Supplies, Tech and Furniture to Help Students Go ‘Back to School Proud’
    Business Wire

    Office Depot Unveils Hot New Supplies, Tech and Furniture to Help Students Go ‘Back to School Proud’

    Office Depot, Inc. (ODP), a leading omnichannel provider of business services and supplies, products and technology solutions, is helping students and teachers, from kindergarten to college, go “Back to School Proud” this year with the ultimate assortment of products, furniture and tech that let their personality and individuality shine through as they head back to the classroom. This year, shoppers can give back to local schools through two different programs and learn about Start Proud!™, Office Depot’s new philanthropic program created to make a substantial difference for deserving students, parents and teachers. Additionally, customers can take advantage of Office Depot’s omni-channel shopping options via officedepot.com/school from any device and opt to buy online, pick up in-store or have their haul delivered straight to their front door via next-business day delivery.

  • Schools should stop telling parents how to raise their children, Ofsted report says 
    The Telegraph

    Schools should stop telling parents how to raise their children, Ofsted report says 

    Schools should stop telling parents how to raise their children, Ofsted report says 

  • Somali students volunteer to educate the dispossessed
    AFP

    Somali students volunteer to educate the dispossessed

    Taking time out from their studies, a group of young student volunteers in Somalia's capital are providing free education to children uprooted from their homes by war and famine. Seven years after hunger and disease killed a quarter of a million people, and in the midst of an ongoing Islamist insurgency in Somalia, so-called IDP camps dot Mogadishu. Most of the volunteers are students at local universities, such as Abdirashid Abdulahi, one of the group's founders.

  • San Jose Unified, charter battle over school site
    San Jose Mercury News

    San Jose Unified, charter battle over school site

    A month before the start of the new school year, dozens of parents are still battling with the San Jose Unified over a location for a new K-8 charter school that the district has been reluctant to support. The charter school, Promise Academy that will partner on curriculum with the Tech Museum of Innovation, has requested space at one of six elementary schools near downtown San Jose, where most of the low-income students live. But the district has offered the academy room for 197 students at Allen at Steinbeck, a campus in south San Jose near the Westfield Oakridge Mall. “I don't think it would be possible for me to send my kid there. It's too far.” said Lety Gomez, a San Jose mom who hopes to

  • Florida State to relocate statue near front of campus
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Florida State to relocate statue near front of campus

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida State University President John Thrasher has accepted a pair of recommendations by a university panel tasked with reviewing statues and recognitions throughout campus. Thrasher said on Tuesday that the statue of Francis Eppes, which is located near the school's main administration building, will be removed and relocated elsewhere on campus. Student groups voiced opposition to the Eppes statue because he was a slave owner. Eppes was the grandson of Thomas Jefferson. Thrasher also announced he will seek approval from the Florida Legislature to remove of the name of B.K. Roberts from the College of Law building. Roberts, a former state Supreme Court justice, authored

  • 4 Entrepreneurial Skills We Should Be Teaching in Schools
    San Francisco Chronicle

    4 Entrepreneurial Skills We Should Be Teaching in Schools

    "If you can dodge a wrench, you can dodge a ball" is the most memorable line from the 2004 movie Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story. In the film, a kid fails to dodge the heavy steel projectile and gets nailed in the face; he falls to the floor writhing in pain. For me, this is the perfect metaphor for the American educational system, with the wrench being the future students aren't prepared for. But, it doesn't have to be this way. We can teach that kid, the ill-prepared student roaming the halls of the school in Everywhere, USA, to anticipate and learn to play -- to succeed. We can teach him to build platforms, create confidence, recognize patterns and win by failing. We can teach him entrepreneurship.

  • Proposed ordinance would fine Arlington Heights parents with truant kids
    Chicago Tribune

    Proposed ordinance would fine Arlington Heights parents with truant kids

    Arlington Heights parents who fail to ensure their kids attend school consistently could be fined and ticketed under a proposed change to the village code that trustees discussed recently. Rick Veenstra, who works as the village's school resource officer at Arlington Heights School District 25, explained to village board members during a committee meeting July 16 that the ordinance change is needed to try and address unexcused absences at the school district. Although chronic truancy is rare at District 25, the police department has seen continual attendance issues with about 10 families across the district — all of whom have children with at least 10 unexcused absences during a school year, Veenstra said.

  • The awkward obligation: When you suspect a student is dangerous
    Chicago Tribune

    The awkward obligation: When you suspect a student is dangerous

    Two decades ago, Americans hoped the slaughter of students at Columbine High School would prove to be a horrible aberration, an event provoked by some bizarre confluence of causes unlikely to be repeated. Tragically, we now know better. School shootings in America have proved maddeningly difficult to predict — and just as maddeningly difficult to prevent. There's no widely accepted profile of the young person likely to emerge as a shooter. Law enforcement authorities say attackers have been male and female, high academic achievers and laggards, loners and popular students. Some made threats, others didn't. Some showed symptoms of mental illness or were under psychiatric care, others didn't and

  • Public Schooling Must Discriminate Against Religion. American Education Must Not
    Forbes

    Public Schooling Must Discriminate Against Religion. American Education Must Not

    We fight about many things in public schools, from what time the day starts to the saltiness of lunches. But few battles are more painful than ones involving closely-held values, or intensely personal attributes such as race or culture. And among such searing conflicts, none are further beyond resolution within public schooling than religious battles, because the only thing public schools are outright legally prohibited from advancing is religious belief. This prohibition hasn't always existed. For much of American history many public schools were de facto Protestant, but since the 1960s public schools advancing religious beliefs has been barred. With good reason: If you weren't religious, or