Civil Rights

Latest news and discussion about civil rights in the United States.
  • Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court to Legalize Workplace Discrimination Against Gay Employees
    Time

    Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court to Legalize Workplace Discrimination Against Gay Employees

    Workers' sexual orientation is not protected under Title VII legislation, federal lawyers argue

  • Gun control endangers our constitutional rights
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Gun control endangers our constitutional rights

    Instead of his statement “My rights are more important than collective rights,” he should have written, My opinions are more important, etc. If one were to apply his analysis to other rights in our Constitution or Bill of Rights, he could justify restricting voting, alcohol, driving, free speech, political party affiliation or any other activity based solely on his opinion and the actions of a few. Taking away the rights of millions, based on the illegal acts of a few, must never happen in a free society. Although I am not a member of Manchester United Methodist, I have had the privilege to attend various services and functions as an invited guest and friend of many members, and it has been a rewarding experience.

  • Louisiana seeks proposals for civil rights markers
    SFChronicle.com

    Louisiana seeks proposals for civil rights markers

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — State officials are looking for suggestions on what to include in the new Louisiana Civil Rights Trail. The Louisiana Office of Tourism says in a news release that submissions can include sites, "events, persons, activities, stories, or experiences that had a significant impact on the Civil Rights Movement in Louisiana." In recent months officials have held 15 meetings across the state to discuss the project. Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser says the Louisiana Civil Rights Trail will recognize the "stories, people and locations" that played a crucial role in the history of the state and the country. The deadline to submit suggestions online is Dec. 6.

  • The Seattle Times

    Race and the death penalty: Arguments ongoing in N Carolina

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Four death row prisoners will argue to North Carolina's highest court that racial bias so infected their trials that they should be resentenced to life in prison as attorneys revive arguments about a repealed law on race and capital punishment. The state Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday and Tuesday in the cases of four death row inmates who briefly were resentenced to life without parole when legislators approved the Racial Justice Act in 2009. The law was repealed four years later. Justices also will hear from attorneys for two other death row prisoners whose claims under the act weren't decided before the law was repealed in 2013. Under the act, condemned men and

  • Civil rights and business leader dies
    Houston Chronicle

    Civil rights and business leader dies

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A Rhode Island civil rights and business leader has died. The Providence Journal reports Michael Van Leesten died Friday. He was 80. Van Leesten helped co-found and served as CEO of the Opportunities Industrialization Center of Rhode Island, which provides job training, career counseling and other programs for people from underserved communities. He also worked for Connecticut's Mashantucket Pequot Tribe and helped develop their Foxwoods Resort Casino. Earlier in life, Van Leesten helped register black people to vote in Alabama in the 1960s. He was also a star basketball player at Rhode Island College. James Vincent, president of the NAACP Providence branch, called his

  • Appeals court upholds ruling on fees in gay marriage case
    seattlepi.com

    Appeals court upholds ruling on fees in gay marriage case

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Federal appeals judges have upheld a ruling that the state of Kentucky must pay $224,000 in legal expenses stemming from a former county clerk's refusal to issue same-sex marriage licenses. News outlets report a three-judge panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati on Friday upheld a 2017 ruling that the state must pay attorney fees and costs incurred by same-sex couples who sued. Lawyers for Gov. Matt Bevin, who supported former Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis when he ran for election in 2015, argued in January that Davis should pay the fees, not the state. A Bevin spokesman said in a statement, "We respect the court's decision." The lower court ruling

  • Medium

    A Post-Trump GOP needs to be leaders in the fight for Civil Rights and Racial Justice

    The Trump moment in the GOP won't last forever, despite it feeling like an eternity. There are simply too many party leaders and voters who are longing for a return to normalcy. There will be a GOP post-Trump, and at that time there will have to be a public reckoning of the kind of party Republicans want to be after the cult of personality ends. Part of this soul searching must include a candid look at the state of racial politics in the GOP. Things aren't looking great right now. There's literally one black senator who is a Republican. The two Latinos, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, are both Cuban like myself, a historically Republican voting block that itself is experiencing a rapid erosion of loyalty

  • The Chattanoogan

    Tennessee Supreme Court Vacates Board Of Professional Responsibility

    In an opinion released Friday, the Tennessee Supreme Court vacated the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility's Formal Ethics Opinion 2017-F-163, which provided guidance to prosecutors about ethical duties under Tennessee Rule of Professional Conduct 3.8(d).  On March 15, 2018, the Board of Professional Responsibility issued Formal Ethics Opinion 2017-F-163 with the purpose of clarifying Rule 3.8(d) of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct.  Rule 3.8(d) covers a prosecutor's ethical duties to disclose evidence or information tending to negate the guilt of the accused or to mitigate the offense.  The Ethics Opinion interpreted Tennessee's ethical rules for prosecutors as extending

  • 45 landmark Supreme Court cases that changed American life as we knew it
    Business Insider

    45 landmark Supreme Court cases that changed American life as we knew it

    The US Supreme Court was formed in 1789. It's gone from five seats to 10, and is now fixed at nine. It makes fewer than 100 decisions every year, but its choices have had a huge impact on the country. Some decisions have empowered women, helped protect the environment, or guaranteed a person's right to expression. Others have strengthened racist laws, enabled forced sterilization, and allowed unequal schooling. Here is a guide to 45 of the Supreme Court's most impactful decisions. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The US Supreme Court, the court of last resort, has undeniably changed the country. It makes fewer than 100 decisions every year that have sweeping effects on American

  • Pennsylvania House wins appeal in atheist prayer-policy suit
    The Seattle Times

    Pennsylvania House wins appeal in atheist prayer-policy suit

    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A federal appeals court reversed a lower court decision and ruled Friday that the Pennsylvania House of Representatives' policy of barring atheists from delivering invocations does not violate the U.S. Constitution. Friday's decision by the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds the Pennsylvania House's policy of limiting prayers at the start of legislative sessions to guest chaplains who believe in God or a divine or higher power. It reverses last year's decision by a district judge, who sided with the atheists, agnostics, freethinkers and humanists who sued. The judge ruled that the restrictions violated constitutional prohibitions on making laws that establish a religion.

  • Bloomfield seeks to crowdfund remaining balance of Ten Commandments lawsuit fees
    The Farmington Daily Times

    Bloomfield seeks to crowdfund remaining balance of Ten Commandments lawsuit fees

    FARMINGTON — The City of Bloomfield is asking community members to help it pay nearly $500,000 that it owes to American Civil Liberties Union lawyers. The city launched a GoFundMe fundraiser on Aug. 13 asking for help raising $467,000. As of the morning of Aug. 22, it had received $100 in donations. "Given the overwhelming public support during the litigation, the City is reaching out to concerned citizens in an effort to help crowd fund the remaining balance owed in attorneys' fees," the GoFundMe page states. "The City appreciates all of the support private citizens can offer." A nonprofit law firm, Alliance Defending Freedom, represented the city for free throughout the litigation process.

  • The National Law Review

    Ninth Circuit Denies En Banc Re-Hearing of Facebook First Amendment Challenge—TCPA Constitutionality Fight Headed to the Supremes?

    Following the Ninth Circuit's recent ruling severing portions of the TCPA to convert the statute to a content-neutral restriction in a bid to save it from a robust First Amendment challenge, if Facebook plans to challenge the constitutionality of the TCPA to the highest court in all the land it first had to request an en banc re-hearing by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Well, that box is checked. Yesterday the Ninth Circuit court of appeal issued a characteristically brief denial of Facebook's request for an en banc reconsideration of the Court's decision in Dugid. The en banc denial reads, in its entirety: Judge McKeown votes to deny the petition for rehearing en banc, and Judges Wallace

  • Appeals court upholds ruling on fees in gay marriage case
    The Kansas City Star

    Appeals court upholds ruling on fees in gay marriage case

    Appeals court upholds ruling on fees in gay marriage case Federal appeals judges have upheld a ruling that the state of Kentucky must pay $224,000 in legal expenses stemming from a former county clerk's refusal to issue same-sex marriage licenses. News outlets report a three-judge panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati on Friday upheld a 2017 ruling that the state must pay attorney fees and costs incurred by same-sex couples who sued. Lawyers for Gov. Matt Bevin, who supported former Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis when he ran for election in 2015, argued in January that Davis should pay the fees, not the state. A Bevin spokesman said in a statement, "We respect the court's

  • The Columbus Dispatch

    Patchwork of anti-discrimination laws don't protect all LGBTQ workers

    While working at an auto dealership in 2016, Kathleen O'Donnell said mechanics frequently would sling insults behind her back, calling her a gay slur and referring to her as “Bob” or “Joe” because of her closely cropped hair. A few days before her six-month probationary period ended at the Billings, Montana, dealership, her manager — with tears in his eyes — told her that he had to fire her because she is gay. It was the first time that O'Donnell had been fired from a job. If O'Donnell had worked just a two-hour drive away in Bozeman, she would have been protected by that city's ordinance against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. If she had worked at one of the dozens

  • Attorney who challenged Arkansas gay marriage ban dies
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Attorney who challenged Arkansas gay marriage ban dies

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Cheryl Maples, an attorney who successfully challenged Arkansas' gay marriage ban before the nation's highest court said same-sex couples could wed, has died at age 69. Maples died Thursday in Little Rock from complications of congestive heart failure, her daughter Melina Maples-Granger said. Maples represented same-sex couples who challenged Arkansas' constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman. A Pulaski County judge struck the amendment down in 2014, which led to more than 500 same-sex couples marrying before the ruling was suspended by the state Supreme Court. The state's high court didn't rule before the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay