Charleston shooting

The Charleston church shooting (also known as the Charleston church massacre) was a mass shooting in which Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old white supremacist, murdered nine African Americans during a prayer service at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, on the evening of June 17, 2015. Three other victims survived. The morning after the attack, police arrested Roof in Shelby, North Carolina.
Tracking news about the deadly Charleston, S.C. shooting and suspect Dylann Roof.
  • 'Sheltering wings:' Charleston memorial plan conveys solace
    Associated Press

    'Sheltering wings:' Charleston memorial plan conveys solace

    Designs for a memorial to nine black worshippers slain at a South Carolina church began not at a drafting table, but with questions from grieving family members to prospective architects. They didn't want to see any drawings until they sat down with the eventual designer to discuss how best to honor loved ones lost in the racist attack at Emanuel AME Church.

  • Dylann Roof-Inspired White Supremacist Gets Less Than 3 Years For Attack Plot
    HuffPost

    Dylann Roof-Inspired White Supremacist Gets Less Than 3 Years For Attack Plot

    WASHINGTON ― A South Carolina white supremacist who told an undercover FBI

  • Charleston City Paper

    To close 'Charleston loophole,' FBI will give examiners access to national database

    The FBI will soon allow its background check examiners to access a previously underutilized database of more than 400 million records to determine whether or not gun purchases can go through across the country. The database is called the National Data Exchange, or N-DEx and it is managed by the FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division. It houses information including incident/arrest reports (sometimes including arrest narratives); booking and incarceration reports; pre-trial, probation, and parole reports; warrants; tickets and citations; and field contacts and interviews. Currently, the National Instant Criminal Background Check system (NICS) checks three main database to

  • When Black Women Soar, We Do It Without Wings – Ezinne Ukoha
    Medium

    When Black Women Soar, We Do It Without Wings – Ezinne Ukoha

    When Dylann Roof killed nine unsuspecting Black worshippers in a Charleston church on the evening of June17th, 2015 — the mass shooting was a breathtaking tragedy that was particularly brutal due to the nature of the circumstances. Roof, a young White male who happened upon a prayer service in session — and was generously allowed to participate — specifically targeted the oldest “African Methodist Episcopal Church in the South.” He had done his research and was purposeful in his quest to inspire a race war based on the results of his deadly actions. It was later revealed that Roof was a White supremacist who had a fondness for smugly posing with the Confederate flag. Once this news item was made public — the longstanding debate about whether or not to remove traces of the historical symbol of racial disharmony — fueled by the lethal treachery of White America against Black America — was reignited.

  • Is Bill Shine’s Wife, Darla Shine, a Racist? Let’s Look at the Tweets
    The Wrap

    Is Bill Shine’s Wife, Darla Shine, a Racist? Let’s Look at the Tweets

    Is Darla Shine, the wife of new White House deputy Bill Shine, a racist? Among some of the comments Mediaite screen-captured from the @darlashine account were criticisms of Black Lives Matter, an attempt to explain white supremacist Dylann Roof’s motivation for a mass shooting, a retweet of a meme insulting Africa and complaints about who is allowed to use the N-word and who isn’t. Darla Shine, Bill Shine, and the White House did not immediately respond to requests from TheWrap for comment.

  • This Life with Gracie: Does an apology for slavery matter to you?
    Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    This Life with Gracie: Does an apology for slavery matter to you?

    On the day set aside to celebrate Juneteenth last week, the Charleston City Council formally apologized for the city's role in the slave trade, its support of slavery and for enforcing Jim Crow-era laws. Charleston should be congratulated but it's 2018. What you might find ironic is the apology fell on June 19, which marks the day, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, that enslaved people in Texas learned that the Civil War had ended and they were free. It also happened to take place two days after the third anniversary of the mass murder at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, when the pastor, Clementa Pinckney, and eight black parishioners were shot and killed by a self-described white supremacist.