Apple

Apple Inc. is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Cupertino, California, that designs, develops, and sells consumer electronics, computer software, and online services. The company's hardware products include the iPhone smartphone, the iPad tablet computer, the Mac personal computer, the iPod portable media player, the Apple Watch smartwatch, the Apple TV digital media player, and the HomePod smart speaker.
The latest news and discussion about the tech giant in the post-Steve Jobs era.
  • 11 New Products Apple Could Release This Fall
    Kiplinger

    11 New Products Apple Could Release This Fall

    Apple (AAPL, $209.75) has been on an incredible run over the past decade, shooting nearly 1,200% higher and becoming the first American company to reach a trillion-dollar market capitalization. And when you look back at its meteoric rise, it's unquestionably tied to a tireless march of blockbuster Apple products. Year after year, Apple's biggest quarter is traditionally its fiscal Q1 (ending in December), when the company reaps the rewards of its fall releases -- led by new iPhones and other products -- and holiday sales. This fall is shaping up to be a pivotal one for Apple, and AAPL stock as the company tries to make a meaningful move above $1 trillion in market cap. Naturally there will be new iPhones, but Apple is rumored to be making some other big moves after the iPhone X's 2017 launch was met with mixed results. The company also could open the floodgates across multiple product lines; if even half these new Apple products hit shelves for the holiday shopping season, the next Q1 report could be incredible. Here are 11 new Apple products to expect this fall - from sure bets to long shots. SEE ALSO: 10 Apple Products That Changed Everything (And 10 That Didn't)

  • Apple's best media moves
    Macworld

    Apple's best media moves

    When it comes to entertainment, Apple has a long and storied—if you'll pardon the pun—past. This has formed a sort of shifting triangle of power where Apple, customers, and the entertainment industry have, at various times, found themselves facing off against each other, or making unlikely alliances. In recent years, Apple has more and more ended up making decisions that seem to closely align with the interests of its customers. That's not particularly a surprise, since the customers are ultimately who keep Apple in business, but getting entertainment companies to buy in on those moves is an equally happy development. This bodes well for Apple itself, especially as it prepares to launch its own

  • Apple 2018 iPad Lineup Will Feature Four Devices, Report Claims
    Inverse

    Apple 2018 iPad Lineup Will Feature Four Devices, Report Claims

    The company is making some changes.

  • Not that Apple should worry, but it looks like Google’s first full-time store is coming
    BGR News

    Not that Apple should worry, but it looks like Google’s first full-time store is coming

    Google appears set to be finally moving to correct one of the key differences between the company and Apple, which uses a retail footprint of hundreds of brick-and-mortar stores to push its iGadgets into consumers' hands and subsequently stoke the fandom among the Apple faithful. According to a report in the Chicago Tribune, Google appears close to signing a lease for almost 14,000 square feet of space in Chicago's Fulton Market district, on two floors in a pair of connected buildings near where Google already has a Midwest office headquarters. If it comes to fruition, it would be the first dedicated, standalone retail spot for the Mountain View-based tech giant, which until now has used small spaces and pop-up experiences within other stores as a physical retail outlet. Google, of course, isn't commenting on a potential Chicago store, but it would certainly be a win for that part of the city if things work out. The Tribune notes Google's offices have already helped transform Fulton Market "from a gritty meatpacking and food wholesale hub to an in-demand home for restaurants, residential towers, major offices -- including McDonald’s new headquarters -- and hotels such as the Soho House, Ace and Nobu. National retailers such as Lululemon and Anthropologie also have moved in, but a Google flagship is likely to elevate Fulton Market’s stature as a retail destination." Also worth noting, though: Goole has come to this point before, where it's appeared set to move forward with plans for a dedicated retail presence only for things to fizzle or not really amount to much. Ars Technica's Ron Amadeo, reporting on the Chicago news, offers a reminder that the company once leased space in SoHo, spent millions on renovations, and then just abandoned the project. To be sure, there's a reason Apple got into the physical retail space, and Google would be wise to follow its lead. Surely, it doesn't need much persuading either, given the expansiveness of the company's product portfolio now, which covers everything from Pixel phones to Google Home smart speakers, Google Chromecast and so much more.

  • A bankrupt Applebee's franchisee claimed in a lawsuit that IHOP's 'ballyhooed rebranding' as IHOb put its burger sales at risk (DIN)
    San Francisco Chronicle

    A bankrupt Applebee's franchisee claimed in a lawsuit that IHOP's 'ballyhooed rebranding' as IHOb put its burger sales at risk (DIN)

    Applebee's second-biggest franchisee, RMH Holdings, is claiming in a lawsuit that its parent company, Dine Brands, put its burger sales at risk by allowing sister brand IHOP to temporarily change its name to IHOb.  RMH — which filed for bankruptcy in May — says that Dine Brands exacerbated "the deterioration of Applebee's brand" with IHOP's rebrand.  Applebee's president dismissed concerns, pointing to the fact that Applebee's sales actually grew by 5.7% in the quarter when IHOP rebranded as IHOb.  IHOb is just one of many disagreements between franchisee and franchisor as RMH and Dine Brands duke it out in court. IHOP's short-lived name change to IHOb is getting pulled into a battle between

  • Apple AirPower Price and Release Date Revealed in New Report
    Inverse

    Apple AirPower Price and Release Date Revealed in New Report

    The long-awaited charging pad is almost here.

  • Zane Lowe marches ahead to a new beat while bringing positive vibes to Apple Music's Beats 1
    Los Angeles Times

    Zane Lowe marches ahead to a new beat while bringing positive vibes to Apple Music's Beats 1

    Lowe in 2015 was hired by the tech giant to bring some brand-name recognition — and a gregarious personality — to the world of streaming music, a bold shift at the time away from logarithm-based programming. In the new music retail landscape, Lowe was part of Apple's plan to take on market leader Spotify, and was hyped as a key differentiator in a competitive space in which each outlet offers nearly identical catalogs and pricing structures.

  • Apple Already Has an Answer for Galaxy S10’s Best Feature
    Tech Media Network (Tom's Guide)

    Apple Already Has an Answer for Galaxy S10’s Best Feature

    Apple has found a new method for getting Touch ID into iPhones. The technology would use cameras that would live under the display and offset at certain angles. The cameras would then analyze your fingerprint as you place it on the screen and determine whether you should be given access to the iPhone or not.

  • Apple Already Has an Answer for Galaxy S10’s Best Feature
    Tom's Guide

    Apple Already Has an Answer for Galaxy S10’s Best Feature

    Apple has found a new method for getting Touch ID into iPhones. The technology would use cameras that would live under the display and offset at certain angles. The cameras would then analyze your fingerprint as you place it on the screen and determine whether you should be given access to the iPhone or not.

  • Here's Why Apple's Margins Will Be Flat This Quarter
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Apple's Margins Will Be Flat This Quarter

    There's some bad news and some good news.

  • A 16-year-old hacked Apple and stole 90GB of secure files
    BGR News

    A 16-year-old hacked Apple and stole 90GB of secure files

    Apple’s servers are widely believed to be unhackable, and to date the company hasn't suffered any massive breach that would have exposed user data to hackers. Well, it turns out that while most hackers might not be able to get into Apple’s servers, a sixteen-year-old Australian with a passion for Apple managed to do it, stealing some 90GB of secure files and accessing customer accounts in the process. The best part is that he stored it all in a folder called “hacky hack hack.” The teen’s defense lawyer said the kid was a huge fan of the company and wanted to work for Apple, according to The Age. His name can’t be shared because he’s still a minor, but also because he’s a well-known individual in the international hacking community. Apple, meanwhile, is "very sensitive about publicity” on the matter, and it’s quite understandable why. The kid apparently used VPNs and other systems to hide his identity and hacked Apple’s servers for about a year. He also had access to authorized keys, the kind that grant log-in access to users and should be extremely secure. The hack apparently “worked flawlessly” until Apple caught wind of it. It’s unclear what kind of data the hacker stole, or how it all happened. While the attacker tried to hide his identity, Apple was able to identify the serial numbers of the laptops used to perform the attacks, and that’s how the investigation led to Australia. The Australian Federal Police (AFP) seized two laptops, a mobile phone, and a hard drive, discovering proof of the hack in the process, including the “hacky hack hack” folder. The teen apparently used WhatsApp to brag about his achievements to other parties. He pleaded guilty in court and now awaits sentencing... and Apple should probably follow up with a job offer.