Anchorage, Alaska

Anchorage is a unified home rule municipality in the U.S. state of Alaska, located on the West Coast of the United States. With an estimated 291,538 residents in 2018, it is Alaska's most populous city and contains more than 40 percent of the state's total population; among the 50 states, only New York has a higher percentage of residents who live in its most populous city.
  • Wildfire burns at least 50 structures, prompts evacuations
    seattlepi.com

    Wildfire burns at least 50 structures, prompts evacuations

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — High wind pushed a weekend Alaska wildfire across the main highway connecting Anchorage and Fairbanks and burned at least 50 structures, according to the state Division of Forestry. Fire officials did not have details on what kinds of structures burned and whether they were homes, outbuildings or businesses. The fire along the Parks Highway north of Wasilla was one of two that closed state highways. High wind on the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage pushed a second wildfire across the Sterling Highway into the Skilak Wildlife Recreation Area and closed the highway. Alaska generally sees wildfires subside by August. However, July was the warmest month ever recorded in

  • Blooms, beasts affected as Alaska records hottest month
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Blooms, beasts affected as Alaska records hottest month

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures. So did children in the coastal town of Nome. Wildfire season started early and stayed late. Thousands of walruses thronged to shore. Unusual weather events like this could become more common with climate warming, said Brian Brettschneider, an associate climate researcher at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' International Arctic Research Center. Alaska has seen "multiple decades-long increases" in

  • Alaska lawsuit blames fatal home fire on gas company, owners
    SFChronicle.com

    Alaska lawsuit blames fatal home fire on gas company, owners

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska wrongful death lawsuit blames a natural gas company and the owners of a mobile home for a fire that killed five young girls who had been left home alone, a report said. Parents Jimmy Flores and Janelle Quackenbush, who rented the home, filed the lawsuit Thursday in Palmer Superior Court, The Anchorage Daily News reported Saturday. Enstar Natural Gas, the mobile home's owners, managers and real-estate companies contributed to the deaths in 2017 by failing to fix problems with the home in the community of Butte, the lawsuit said. The children ranged in age from 3 to 12 and their parents are seeking more than $100,000 in damages each, among other requests. The

  • Thousands in Northeast Ohio still without power hours after strong morning storms
    cleveland.com

    Thousands in Northeast Ohio still without power hours after strong morning storms

    CLEVELAND, Ohio – More than 23,000 FirstEnergy customers in Northeast Ohio still don't have power Sunday afternoon after strong thunderstorms moved through the area. The majority of those without power are in Ashtabula County, where FirstEnergy reports there are nearly 16,000 customers in the dark as of about 2:15 p.m. Sunday, according to the FirstEnergy outage website. In Cuyahoga County, there are still about 3,500 customers without electricity. Fairview Park has the most outages, with about 900, and North Olmsted trails with just under 800. About 2,400 FirstEnergy customers in Lake County are experiencing outages as of about 2:15 p.m. Those without power are concentrated in Madison and Madison

  • Russian sailor's 50-year-old message in a bottle found on Alaskan shore
    The Telegraph

    Russian sailor's 50-year-old message in a bottle found on Alaskan shore

    A Russian Navy sailor has been reunited with his 50-year-old letter in a bottle after it washed up on the shore of western Alaska.

  • Daughter of deceased Alaska state senator applies for seat
    SFChronicle.com

    Daughter of deceased Alaska state senator applies for seat

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The daughter of a recently-deceased Alaska state senator applied to fill his vacant seat, a report said. Tali Birch Kindred, 37, announced her decision last week following the Aug. 7 death of her father, 68-year-old Chris Birch, Alaska Public Media reported Friday. Birch died from a torn or ruptured aorta after taking Birch Kindred and her family to the Anchorage airport for a vacation flight, she said. Benefits consultant Albert Fogle also filed a financial disclosure Friday, a prerequisite for applying. Fogle ran unsuccessfully in the 2018 GOP primary for a state House seat. GOP leaders in Birch's district collected applications to replace Birch in accordance with state

  • Alaska man discovers message in bottle from Russian Navy
    Daily Hampshire Gazette

    Alaska man discovers message in bottle from Russian Navy

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska. Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported. “I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.” Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response

  • Alaska sees warmest month ever, with melting sea ice, more wildfires and thousands of walruses coming ashore
    Chicago Tribune

    Alaska sees warmest month ever, with melting sea ice, more wildfires and thousands of walruses coming ashore

    Unusual weather events like this could become more common with climate warming, said Brian Brettschneider, an associate climate researcher at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' International Arctic Research Center. Alaska has seen "multiple decades-long increases" in temperature, he said.

  • The Seattle Times

    Power restored after thousands affected by outages in Alaska

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Power has been restored to thousands of people in Alaska after strong winds caused multiple power outages. The Anchorage Daily News reported Saturday that outages affecting more than 4,000 people were reported across the Anchorage area. Officials say residents in Midtown, around the University-Medical District and in parts of Muldoon lost power Saturday after wind blew multiple trees on a transmission line. Utility officials say those affected had power restored hours later. Officials say about 3,600 customers serviced by Municipal Light & Power and about 250 customers serviced by Chugach Electric Association lost power. Authorities say police helped direct traffic, because