All about books

Google Books (previously known as Google Book Search and Google Print and by its codename Project Ocean) is a service from Google Inc. that searches the full text of books and magazines that Google has scanned, converted to text using optical character recognition (OCR), and stored in its digital database. Books are provided either by publishers and authors through the Google Books Partner Program, or by Google's library partners through the Library Project.
Read a good book lately? Tell us about it, or find what to read next.
  • Fall authors include Elizabeth Strout, Edwidge Danticat, Pete Souza and Richard Russo
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Fall authors include Elizabeth Strout, Edwidge Danticat, Pete Souza and Richard Russo

    Fall authors include Elizabeth Strout, Edwidge Danticat, Pete Souza and Richard Russo

  • the Guardian

    Martin Amis novels – ranked!

    As literature's oldest enfant terrible turns 70, John Self, who took his pen name from an Amis character, revisits the collected works 14. The Pregnant Widow (2010) From the portentous title (via Russian thinker Alexander Herzen) on, this is a project that should have been strangled at birth. It betrays its troubled origins – the unpicked remnants of an autobiographical novel – in the thinness of the material, which is all the more scandalous when you think how rich and full Amis's other long novels are. This fiction about feminism via a 1970s Italian holiday is cheerfully vulgar but – the worst horror of all for comic writing – fundamentally boring. Typical line “How was it that he had never

  • Janhvi Kapoor trolled for holding book upside down at book launch event, internet calls her 'nadan ladki'
    Hindustan Times

    Janhvi Kapoor trolled for holding book upside down at book launch event, internet calls her 'nadan ladki'

    Janhvi Kapoor was trolled for holding a book upside down at a book launch event in Delhi. Janhvi was in the capital for the launch of the Hindi edition of author Harinder Sikka's book, Calling Sehmat. As soon as the photographs from the event made way to the internet, the actor became a target of massive trolling. The trolls even termed her as 'nadan ladki'. “Is she holding the book upside down,” asked one. “Holding the book upside down at launch. That's beauty with no brains people,” wrote another. “she's holding the book upside down.. Does she even know the title of the book,” read a comment. Janhvi was seen in a white saree at event. She shared pictures of her look on Instagram as well. On

  • 'Plant-based Tokyo': A compelling guide to vegetarian food in the capital
    The Japan Times

    'Plant-based Tokyo': A compelling guide to vegetarian food in the capital

    A new resource for visitors and residents, “Plant-based Tokyo” by Momoko Nakamura is a beautifully presented, bilingual book of 45 dining establishments in the Tokyo and Shonan areas. Each location is committed to what Nakamura describes as “sustainable food system practices” and high-quality food. Plant-based Tokyo, by Momoko Nakamura. 288 pages MILESTAFF, Food. The book is prefaced with a short guide that includes a list of Japanese vocabulary so that readers can explain “I am vegan,” or “I am vegetarian,” et cetera. Each of the restaurant descriptions is then focused on the chef or restaurant owner's philosophy and relationship to food. Nakamura writes with a calm, charming voice, and describes

  • 'Sushi Master': Nothing fishy about this masterful account
    The Japan Times

    'Sushi Master': Nothing fishy about this masterful account

    “109.” That's the number on the front cover of “Sushi Master.” It's Nick Sakagami's osakana maisutā (fish master) number. Think of it as an accreditation similar to a master sommelier. Currently, Sakagami is the only certified fish master living outside Japan. Sushi Master, by Nick Sakagami. 168 pages QUARRY BOOKS, Food. Originally from Tokyo, Sakagami is a longtime resident of the U.S. where, from his base in California, he runs a fish consultancy and import-export business. Fish is his life: from trading in the labyrinth fish markets in LA and Tokyo, to checking in on sustainable fish farms in Tahiti and Wakayama Prefecture, or easing into a seat at the counter of a sushi restaurant on either

  • Jamaica Gleaner

    St James dominates National Reading Competition

    Three of the five national champions in the Jamaica Library Service National Reading Competition 2019 emerged from the parish of St James. At the awards ceremony held at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel yesterday, 65 parish champions across five age categories were celebrated. The competition began at the parish library level in March with more than 3,700 entrants and culminated with the national finals on August 22. Seven-year-old Travis Kerr, the national champion for the 6-8 age group, aspires to be a cardiologist. He received the prizes for obtaining the most points in the children category as well as overall in the competition. “I feel excited. I was just working hard and reading a lot of books,”

  • BEYOND LOCAL: Bored? Why not read this fascinating history of boredom?
    BayToday.ca

    BEYOND LOCAL: Bored? Why not read this fascinating history of boredom?

    This article, written by Michelle Fu, University of Toronto, originally appeared on The Conversation and is republished here with permission: “I'm bored” is a statement many parents dread hearing during the summer holidays. Should parents scramble to fill the unstructured time of summer for their kids — so they don't complain of nothing to do (or worse, get into trouble)? Or should they allow children time, perhaps, to be bored? Indeed, today, the popular idea exists, advanced by psychologists, management experts or innovators, that boredom is important for the development of qualities such as creativity and brilliant ideas. Boredom is not just viewed as something to be avoided, but also something

  • https://www.oneindia.com

    Jaitley's family insists, Modi doesn't cut short foreign trip

    New Delhi, Aug 24: Prime Minister Narendra Modi is unlikely to cut short his foreign visit in event of Arun Jaitley's death. Modi spoke with both the wife and son of Jaitley and expressed his condolences. Both insisted that he does not cut short his foreign trip. With the demise of Arun Jaitley Ji, I have lost a valued friend, whom I have had the honour of knowing for decades. His insight on issues and nuanced understanding of matters had very few parallels. He lived well, leaving us all with innumerable happy memories. We will miss him! BJP and Arun Jaitley Ji had an unbreakable bond. As a fiery student leader, he was at forefront of protecting our democracy during the Emergency. He became a

  • Book 'stole' Mormon historian's work, but publisher offers a settlement to 'make it right'
    The Salt Lake Tribune

    Book 'stole' Mormon historian's work, but publisher offers a settlement to 'make it right'

    After more than a decade of digging out anecdotes about the Mormon past — drawing a line from an elder's letter here, a paragraph from a Sunday school report there — historian Ardis E. Parshall has grown accustomed to seeing her original work pop up in unfamiliar places. Parshall discovered that more than 60 of the anecdotes in the 348-page book came from her Mormon history blog, Keepapitchinin, as well as from other professional papers the independent historian had written. Neither Jenkins nor her publisher, Covenant Communications (a branch of Deseret Book, which is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), contacted the researcher in advance to ask permission, she said, nor even to inform her what was being included in the book.

  • Researching 1619 in Virginia took hours, overseas travel
    Houston Chronicle

    Researching 1619 in Virginia took hours, overseas travel

    HAMPTON, Va. (AP) — The most basic information — dry, demographic details — is contained in a census that was taken in 1620, and then subsequent ones in 1624 and '25. They contained the names of the residents of Jamestown, including at least some of the Africans who had recently arrived. Here the names are recorded for posterity, and if you want to view the handwritten notes, you need to travel to England — to Magdalene College in Cambridge, or to the UK National Archives public records office in Kew. When Hampton History Museum registrar Beth Austin was researching those who arrived in 1619 — the city recently commemorated the 400th anniversary — her budget would not cover a round trip to England,

  • Audible Captions Feature Prompts Copyright Suit from Top U.S. Publishers
    The Hollywood Reporter

    Audible Captions Feature Prompts Copyright Suit from Top U.S. Publishers

    Audible's recently announced Audible Captions feature has sparked a copyright infringement lawsuit from seven top publishers that alleges the service creates unauthorized copies of their books by generating error-ridden text. Through the Association of American Publishers, Chronicle Books, Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins Publishers, Macmillan Publishing Group, Penguin Random House, Scholastic and Simon & Schuster on Friday sued the Amazon-owned audiobook giant for allegedly creating unlawful derivative works and asked the court to stop the service. Audible announced Audible Captions on July 31 and billed it as a way to boost interest in reading and help listeners who have difficulty understanding

  • www.iran-daily.com

    Avicenna bust unveiled in Hamedan

    The unveiling ceremony was attended by Iran's Minister of Science, Research and Technology Mansour Gholami, Hamedan's Governor General Saeed Shahrokhi and a number of officials, ISNA wrote. Iranians commemorate Avicenna every year on August 23, which is the nation's Physicians Day. Sculptor Hadi Arabney, a sculptor and painter, has made the bust based on an illustration by Abolhassan Khan-Sediqi. The bust, which is around 120 centimeters in height, is going to be installed on a plinth with two meters height. Avicenna, also known as Ibn Sina, was a Persian and Muslim physician, astronomer, alchemist, chemist, logician, mathematician, metaphysician, philosopher, physicist, poet, scientist and theologian.

  • www.iran-daily.com

    Women, late-in-life new authors, expand Japanese literature

    Japan is home to what many consider the world's first novel, 'The Tale of Genji,' written in the 11th century by noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu. Its modern fiction has been defined mostly by long-established male writers such as past Nobel laureates Kenzaburo Oe and Yasunari Kawabata. And for decades it has been dominated by Haruki Murakami, whose surreal blend of magical realism and pop culture has made him an international bestseller, AP reported. But Japanese literature is beginning to look different as new voices, including young writers, women and the elderly, receive domestic and international recognition. On Friday, two women, Natsuko Imamura and Masumi Oshima, are being presented with the

  • 5 books not to miss: 'Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' Lisbeth Salander returns, 'Respect' tackles sex
    USA TODAY Entertainment

    5 books not to miss: 'Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' Lisbeth Salander returns, 'Respect' tackles sex

    David Lagercrantz continues Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series, and "Respect" tackles sex for young men in the MeToo era.

  • the Guardian

    Lynne Truss on Petersham: 'I consider moving back, but Richmond is too posh for me'

    The author and broadcaster recalls borrowing adult books from Ham library as a child, and walks in Richmond Park I grew up in Petersham, a leafy area between Richmond and Kingston on the south-west outskirts of London. In 1952, a council estate had sprung up on former farmland, and my parents had been awarded a three-bedroomed, red-brick end-of-terrace house opposite the new infants' school. I was born three years later. This house represented a huge improvement to their lives. Mum once told me that when she first moved in, she could hardly credit the number of taps (six) that she didn't have to share with strangers. It was quite a small house, and there were five of us, so space and privacy