Science

  • Solar plane takes off from Egypt on final leg of world tour
    Reuters

    Solar plane takes off from Egypt on final leg of world tour

    By Lila Hassan CAIRO (Reuters) - An aircraft powered by solar energy left Egypt on Sunday on the last leg of the first ever fuel-free flight around the globe. Solar Impulse 2, a spindly single-seat plane, took off from Cairo in darkness en route to Abu Dhabi, its final destination, with a flight expected to take between 48 and 72 hours. The plane, which began its journey in Abu Dhabi in March 2015, has been piloted in turns by Swiss aviators Andre Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard in a campaign to build support for clean energy technologies.

  • "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    "Shark Tank" Star Reveals #1 Mortgage Payoff Tip

    If you're over 40 years old and you own a home, you need to read this. (It's not what you think!)

  • Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows
    LiveScience.com

    Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

    Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France. An avid mountaineer, he died on Feb. 17, 1934, when he was climbing alone near the village of Marche-les-Dames, southeast of Brussels.

  • Associated Press

    Wyoming Vet Lab getting biohazard facility to test wildlife

    Work is underway at the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory to add a biohazard facility that will focus on the nasty diseases found in some Wyoming wildlife, like the plague and rabies. Director William Laegreid said the upgraded "biosafety level 3" laboratory will allow veterinarians to keep the main facility open when an animal shows up with a serious disease. The Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, operated under the University of Wyoming, focuses on diagnosing diseases present in Wyoming wildlife, the Laramie Boomerang reported (http://bit.ly/29TDubl).

  • The Cheat Sheet

    7 Ways That 'Star Trek' Changed the World

    The idea that Star Trek has changed the world might sound as farfetched as some of the USS Enterprise’s spacefaring missions, but the truth is that the science fiction series has directly or indirectly impacted both our present and future. It seems like an absurd statement — when creator Gene Roddenberry was first kicking around the idea in 1964, he probably never imagined that Star Trek would still be around in 2016 with reboots in the pipeline. Here are seven ways that Star Trek changed the world. 1.

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  • Climb Inside Apollo 11 in Virtual Reality and 3D
    Time

    Climb Inside Apollo 11 in Virtual Reality and 3D

    There wasn’t much glamour in an Apollo command module. The ship was little more than an 11-ft (3.3 m) tall conical capsule that served as home to a trio of astronauts for most of their trip to and from the moon. It had a habitable volume of just 210 cubic

  • Reuters

    'Brain training' cut dementia risk in healthy adults -U.S. study

    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - A computerized brain training program cut the risk of dementia among healthy people by 48 percent, U.S. researchers said on Sunday in reporting an analysis of the results of a 10-year study. The preliminary findings, presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto, are the first to show that any kind of intervention could delay the development of dementia in normal, healthy adults. To date, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have largely rejected evidence that computer-based cognitive-training software or "brain games" have any effect on cognitive function.

  • That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds
    LiveScience.com

    That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

    Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.

  • Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security Camera Systems: Going Wireless

    Security camera systems allow you to keep your family and property protected from criminal activity. See why many homeowners are making the switch.

  • Manatees head to Caribbean in first ever repopulation scheme
    AFP

    Manatees head to Caribbean in first ever repopulation scheme

    Singapore's zoo said Monday it will send two manatees to Guadeloupe as part of the world's first repopulation programme for the animal, which became extinct on the French Caribbean island in the early 20th century. Males Kai, seven, and Junior, six, will be the first manatees -- which are also known as sea cows -- on the island since the species died out. Another 13 manatees of both genders from zoos around the world will follow the pair to the Grand Cul-de-Sac Marin, a 15,000 hectare (37,000 acre) protected bay, the Asian city-state's zoo operator said.

  • Associated Press

    Scientists work toward storing digital information in DNA

    Her computer, Karin Strauss says, contains her "digital attic" — a place where she stores that published math paper she wrote in high school, and computer science schoolwork from college. Strauss, who works at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, is working to make that sci-fi fantasy a reality. Rather, they aim to help companies and institutions archive huge amounts of data for decades or centuries, at a time when the world is generating digital data faster than it can store it.

  • The Cheat Sheet

    The 5 Biggest Regrets People Have Before They Die

    With all the distraction that life provides us, it can be easy to let the things that matter fade into the background. While never pleasant, death has the uncanny ability to peel back the layers and get to the heart of what matters. Being aware of death

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  • One of the fastest growing fields in science still makes a lot of people very uncomfortable
    Quartz

    One of the fastest growing fields in science still makes a lot of people very uncomfortable

    Think of someone whose political ideology leads them to ignore and groundlessly reject science. Typically, this often describes those on the right of the political spectrum, where climate change, women’s reproductive health, and even evolution are routinely dismissed. But a massive and fast growing field in science—behavioral genetics—has a huge body of conclusive evidence that, at first reading, seems at odds with left-wing ideology. This week, Robert Plomin, professor of behavioral genetics at King’s College London, published a paper showing that a child’s educational success can be predicted by their genes. Genetic data from 20,000 DNA variants across several genes collectively account for

  • Nectartini? This Little Lemur Has a Taste for Alcohol
    LiveScience.com

    Nectartini? This Little Lemur Has a Taste for Alcohol

    In the new study, the researchers wanted to investigate whether alcohol was part of the aye-ayes' regular diet. But aye-ayes also use this finger to probe for nectar in a plant called the traveler's tree, also native to Madagascar. Previous observations of aye-ayes showed that they spend as much as 20 percent of their feeding time during the rainy season searching for and devouring the liquid treat.

  • This short documentary shows how astronomers hope to find the next habitable planets
    The Verge

    This short documentary shows how astronomers hope to find the next habitable planets

    The short documentary The Search for Earth Proxima outlines the breakthroughs that have led us to these discoveries, and how a group of astronomers plan to look for habitable planets in our neighborhood. It’s hard to detect these Earth-like planets: they’re extremely faint — one astronomer likened it to trying to spot a firefly in a spotlight from 10 miles away. Fortunately, nearby stars make this task a bit easier, and the astronomers want to take a closer look at Alpha Centauri A and B, our closest stellar neighbors.

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  • As Pokemon Popularizes Augmented Reality, Hollywood Explores AR's Potential
    The Hollywood Reporter

    As Pokemon Popularizes Augmented Reality, Hollywood Explores AR's Potential

    Emerging technologies and applications for both augmented and virtual reality will be showcased in a dedicated exhibition area at the annual CG confab Siggraph, which begins today and runs through July 28 at the Anaheim Convention Center. The "VR Village" aims to demonstrate the technology's potential for storytelling, as well as in areas such as education, design and gaming.