Science

  • Musk's SpaceX successfully tests rocket engine that could help us colonize Mars
    CNBC.com

    Musk's SpaceX successfully tests rocket engine that could help us colonize Mars

    The methane-fueled engine is expected to form part of the Dragon rocket, with Musk suggesting the engines are three times more powerful than the current Merlin engines that SpaceX uses on its Falcon 9 rocket. The engine was fired at the company's McGregor, Texas facility, according to a report by tech website Engadget and comes ahead of a long-awaited speech by Elon Musk. USA Today reported on Sunday that Musk would outline his ideas for how to establish a city on Mars within a decade. The speech is due to be held at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, and Musk is expected to detail a new system called the "Mars Colonial Transporter," that could deliver 100 people to the planet Mars.

  • Jupiter Moon May Have Water Plumes That Shoot up 125 Miles
    ABC News

    Jupiter Moon May Have Water Plumes That Shoot up 125 Miles

    The Hubble Space Telescope has spied what appear to be water plumes on one of Jupiter's icy moons shooting up as high as 125 miles. The geysers are apparently from an underground ocean that is thought to exist on Europa, considered one of the top places to search for signs of life in our solar system. The plumes at the south pole were detected by the workhorse telescope as the moon passed in front of Jupiter. Even so, the possible presence of plumes, which shoot up and rain back down on the surface, would "allow us to search for signs of life in the ocean of Europa without needing to drill through miles of ice," astronomer William Sparks of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore said Monday.

  • African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'
    AFP

    African elephants 'suffer worst decline in 25 years'

    The number of African elephants has dropped by around 111,000 in the past decade, a new report released Sunday at the Johannesburg conference on the wildlife trade said, blaming the plummeting figures on poaching. The revelation, the worst drop in 25 years, came amid disagreement on the second day of the global meet over the best way to improve the plight of Africa's elephants, targeted for their tusks. With Namibia and Zimbabwe, wanting to be allowed to sell ivory stockpiles accrued from natural deaths to fund community elephant conservation initiatives, Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Oppah Muchinguri rejected the "imperialistic policies" of opposing countries, branding them a "clear infringement on the sovereign rights of nations".

  • U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today
    LiveScience.com

    U-2 Spy Plane Crash: Why 'Cold War' Aircraft Are Still Relevant Today

    A U-2 spy plane that crashed in northern California earlier this week, killing one of the two pilots, focused attention on a normally clandestine aspect of the U.S. military. The U-2 plane has a long and storied history that stretches back to the late 1950s, but how is the reconnaissance aircraft used today? U-2 planes have been flown by the United States and other nations for more than 60 years, as both a spy plane and an instrument of science.

  • LiveScience.com

    In Shift, Most Americans Now Say President Should Release All Medical Records

    A majority of Americans now say that a U.S. president should release all of his or her medical information. The poll, which was conducted by Gallup last week, found that a slim majority of Americans, 51 percent, said that a president should release all medical information that might affect that person's ability to serve in office, whereas 46 percent said that a president should have the right to keep those medical records private. The new poll results are a change from the results in 2004, when just 38 percent of Americans said that a president should release all of his or her medical information, and 61 percent said that a president should be able to keep those records private, according to Gallup.

  • 1,000mph car gets major funding boost
    Ars Technica

    1,000mph car gets major funding boost

    On Monday morning, the Zhejiang Geely Holding Group—which owns Chinese car brand Geely as well as Volvo and the London Taxi Company—announced that it is now the main sponsor and official automotive partner of the Bloodhound SSC land speed record project. The three-year deal includes both financial and technical support for the project, as well as an extension of Bloodhound SSC's STEM in schools promotion across China. Richard Noble, the main driving force behind Bloodhound SSC (and both previous land speed records) said "We could not have a better partner than Geely: not only are they an international technology company with tremendous vision and capability, they share our passion for innovation

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    WashU receives $23.6 million science grant to understand how single cells work

    ST. LOUIS • A joint effort between Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania received a $23.6 million federal grant to start a new Science and Technology Center. The partnership, fueled by the five-year grant, creates the Science and Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology. It's an effort to understand how single cells work, what they react to and how they can be used or developed to prevent diseases, boost crop practices and more. Single cell organisms are the root of all plants and animals. "Being named an STC is a prestigious distinction reserved for sweeping research projects that have the power to change lives. We're ready to get to work," Guy Genin, principal researcher

  • A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night
    Country Living

    A Rare Black Moon Will Rise In the Sky on Friday Night

    When it comes to rare lunar events, September 2016 seems to be the month that keeps on giving: This Friday, September 30, a Black Moon will rise in the skies of the Western Hemisphere, a phenomenon we haven't seen since March 2014. The Black Moon, which will occur at 8:11 p.m. ET on Friday, will only be happening in the Western Hemisphere because, technically, the new moon will happen on October 1 for the Eastern Hemisphere (they'll be getting their Black Moon at the end of next month). The next time we'll see a second new moon in a single calendar month in the Americas will be July 2019.

  • SpaceX's New Raptor Rocket Engine Shoots Massive Flames, As It Should
    The Drive

    SpaceX's New Raptor Rocket Engine Shoots Massive Flames, As It Should

    For the first time, SpaceX has fired the Raptor rocket engine Elon Musk and his company intend to use to send people to the Red Planet. SpaceX founder Elon Musk tweeted photos of the Raptor rocket engine churning out streams of fiery exhaust Monday morning. In a tweet, Musk stated that "SpaceX propulsion just achieved first firing of the Raptor interplanetary transport engine." The announcement of the first successful firing comes a day before a speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Mexico where Musk will be discuss his plans for sending humans to other planets in our solar system.

  • China Builds The World's Largest Radio Telescope
    Popular Mechanics

    China Builds The World's Largest Radio Telescope

    The world's largest radio telescope began searching for signals from stars and galaxies and, perhaps, extraterrestrial life Sunday in a project demonstrating China's rising ambitions in space and its pursuit of international scientific prestige. Beijing has poured billions into such ambitious scientific projects as well as its military-backed space program, which saw the launch of China's second space station earlier this month. Measuring 500 meters in diameter, the radio telescope is nestled in a natural basin within a stunning landscape of lush green karst formations in southern Guizhou province.

  • India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2
    Mashable

    India to ratify Paris Agreement climate pact on Oct. 2

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India will ratify the Paris Agreement climate change pact on Oct 2. Modi’s announcement on Sunday is seen as a major boost to the implementation of measures at international level in an attempt to control global warming. Modi added that the country has chosen Oct. 2 to coincide with the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, who lived his entire live with minimum carbon footprint.

  • Paris bans cars along part of River Seine
    AFP

    Paris bans cars along part of River Seine

    Strollers and cyclists can breathe easy on the banks of the Seine after Paris on Monday approved a plan to ban cars on a long stretch of riverside road cutting across the city. A centrepiece of her battle against pollution, the plan has divided opinion in the French capital. "We need to slow down a bit, let go, stop and relax," said Violetta Kolodziejczak, a restaurant greeter.

  • Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine
    LiveScience.com

    Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine

    More than 40 people in a Canadian city were treated for an opioid overdose this summer after they smoked crack cocaine that had been contaminated with an opioid drug related to fentanyl, according to a new report. In mid-July, a hospital in the city of Surrey, British Columbia, experienced a large spike in patients needing treatment for an opioid overdose — about 11 patients per day needed treatment, up from the usual four patients per day. Most of the patients had become unconscious after smoking what they thought was crack cocaine, the report said.

  • One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real
    Business Insider

    One of the original 'power posing' researchers now says its effects aren't real

    Authored by Dana Carney and Andy Yap, then of Columbia University, as well as Amy Cuddy of Harvard, the study suggested that standing like Wonder Woman for two minutes could raise testosterone levels and reduce stress hormone levels temporarily. Cuddy gave a TED talk on power posing in 2012 that has been viewed 46 million times, and she's built a lucrative business based partly on the research that power posing works. Dana Carney, who today serves as a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, recently published a report renouncing the effects of power posing.

  • Singapore's manufacturing output inches up by 0.1% in August
    Singapore Business Review

    Singapore's manufacturing output inches up by 0.1% in August

    There has been an upturn in Singapore's manufacturing sector, as output emerges from the red in August. According to the latest figures by the Singapore Economic Development Board manufacturing output increased 0.1% in August 2016.

  • Engadget

    Researchers think chaos theory can get us past Moore's Law

    Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, believed that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit would double every year or two. And, to his credit, that rule pretty much held out between 1965 and 2015, when the laws of physics began to get in the way. Now, researchers at North Carolina State believe that we don't need to obsess over ever-smaller transistors to make chips even more powerful. Instead, they've turned to chaos theory in the hope that mixing things up will provide the performance boost that Intel can't. Lead researcher Behnam Kia explains that we are now "reaching the limits of physics in terms of transistor size." If you've ever listened to one of Intel's presentations, you'll

  • Forensic scientists are burning pigs and flying laser planes to find Mexico’s 43 missing students
    Quartz

    Forensic scientists are burning pigs and flying laser planes to find Mexico’s 43 missing students

    It’s been two years since 43 students from a teacher’s college in the Mexican state of Guerrero went missing and there’s still no trace of them. On Sept. 26, 2014 they disappeared on their way to a protest. A few months later, the government claimed they were killed and burned at a dump by a drug cartel that believed the students were members of a rival group. Since then, though, forensic science has largely disproved that theory, and could eventually provide some answers to the grief-stricken families of “the 43,” as the victims are known, and millions of outraged Mexicans. Pigs in a pyre The Mexican government enlisted an independent group (link in Spanish) of international investigators to

  • Canada confirms Arctic discovery of 200-year-old ship
    AFP

    Canada confirms Arctic discovery of 200-year-old ship

    Canada's parks department on Monday confirmed the discovery of a British exploration ship that vanished during a storied Arctic expedition in 1846. The statement comes two weeks after scientists from the Arctic Research Foundation announced they had found the ship -- part of a two-vessel expedition during which both disappeared -- submerged but well-preserved beneath 24 meters of water in the Northwest Passage. "Parks Canada's underwater archaeology team is proud to confirm that the wreck located in Terror Bay on the south-west side of King William Island, Nunavut is that of HMS Terror," the government agency said.

  • Gorgeous Mars valley was 'once a potentially habitable place'
    CNET

    Gorgeous Mars valley was 'once a potentially habitable place'

    If you want to visit Mars and happen to know a Time Lord who can take you there, you might want to ask to go way, way back in time and stop in at Mawrth Vallis, a fascinating and mysterious part of the Red Planet's landscape. The European Space Agency released a mosaic image of the pockmarked valley on Monday. The "Mawrth Vallis" name is a mashup from two languages. "Mawrth" is Welsh for "Mars" and "Vallis" is Latin for "valley." At over 370 miles (600 kilometers) in length, Mawrth Vallis dwarfs the Grand Canyon. The lighter areas of the large valley point to clay minerals known as phyllosilicates that hint at an ancient source of water. "Phyllosilicates on Mars are evidence of the past presence

  • Asia's poor choking on filthy air
    AFP

    Asia's poor choking on filthy air

    Polluted air is a "public health emergency", the World Health Organization said Tuesday, adding nine out of 10 people globally breathe bad air that is blamed for more than six million deaths a year. Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region -- including China -- are the hardest hit, the data showed. South Asia is also badly affected, with the WHO saying poor air quality is responsible for the deaths of more than 600,000 people in India and 37,000 people in Bangladesh every year.

  • Cosmos Magazine

    Boeing and AIMS team up to protect Great Barrier Reef

    The Great Barrier Reef stretches 2,300 kilometres down Australia's east coast – that's a lot of area to monitor. Aerospace manufacturer Boeing and the Australian Institute of Marine Science have signed a five-year agreement to develop advanced monitoring capabilities to better understand the health of the Great Barrier Reef. Brisbane-based engineers from Boeing will team up with marine scientists to develop innovative sea-to-space technologies including unmanned aerial vehicles, satellites and autonomous underwater vehicles. “Working with Boeing will provide an ideal platform from which we can paint a detailed picture of what is happening on the reef,” AIMS chief John Gunn, a member of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation’s International Science Advisory Committee, said in a press release.

  • Barrons

    Amgen: The Blame Game

    This morning, Amgen (AMGN) reported that its cancer drug Kyprolis failed to do what it hoped it would in a late-stage trial. Amgen announced the Clarion study (head to head versus Velcade) did not meet stat sig for progression free survival although survival did show a solid trend (Hr=1.21). This is a surprise since the prior Endeavor second line study was a very big success and today’s result in first line may be due to lack of sufficient powering in our view, given strong trend in survival and deeper responses with Kyprolis should better especially earlier. Furthermore, all 3 key-opinion leaders Amgen hosted emphasized that the Clarion study was not designed optimally, since (a) MP is no longer used (does not bring down disease to high degree and is a toxic regimen), and (b) the study duration was too limited.

  • How Two Astronomers Accidentally Discovered the Big Bang
    Great Big Story

    How Two Astronomers Accidentally Discovered the Big Bang

    Nowadays, it's a universally accepted theory that the universe began 13.8 billion years ago with the Big Bang. But did you know that two radio astronomers unintentionally stumbled upon its discovery? In the 1960s, Robert Wilson and Arno Penzias were measuring the brightness of the sky with their radio telescope. No matter where they pointed it, they picked up an inexplicable droning sound. What initially sounded like a mistake ended up being the discovery of a lifetime.