Style Cover
  • Clinton pokes fun at Trump for ‘defective’ mic complaint
    Liz Goodwin

    Clinton pokes fun at Trump for ‘defective’ mic complaint

    WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Hillary Clinton poked fun at Donald Trump on Tuesday morning for complaining about his microphone after the first presidential debate. “Anybody who complained about the microphone is not having a good night,” Clinton told reporters in a brief question-and-answer session at the back of her plane before taking off for a rally in Raleigh, N.C. Monday night, Trump entered the spin room at Hofstra University after a tough first debate and complained that his mic had been “defective.” He mused whether that was on purpose.

  • NYPD fact-checks Donald Trump’s debate claims on crime
    Caitlin Dickson

    NYPD fact-checks Donald Trump’s debate claims on crime

    The first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton drew a plethora of fact checkers, poised and ready to scrutinize every statement uttered by either candidate Monday night. The New York Police Department, somewhat unexpectedly, joined the fact-checking fray.

  • Donald Trump: I opposed Iraq War, just call Sean Hannity!
    Michael Walsh

    Donald Trump: I opposed Iraq War, just call Sean Hannity!

    Feel free to call Sean Hannity if you want to know what Donald Trump thought about invading Iraq before the war started. Trump frequently touts his purported opposition to the now-unpopular war as proof of his vision when it comes to foreign policy. “I did not support the war in Iraq,” Trump said at the debate.

  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton deny their own words in debate
    CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER and JEFF HORWITZ

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton deny their own words in debate

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's habit of peddling hype and fabrication emerged unabated in the first presidential debate while Hillary Clinton played it cautiously in her statements, though not without error. They both denied making statements that they are on the record as saying.

  • Rudy Giuliani: I’d skip future debates if I were Trump
    Michael Walsh

    Rudy Giuliani: I’d skip future debates if I were Trump

    Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said he would not participate in the next two presidential debates if he were in Donald Trump’s position — that is, unless the moderators agreed to certain conditions. The outspoken Trump adviser expressed dismay over NBC journalist Lester Holt’s performance moderating the debate Monday night at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Politico reported. Giuliani was apparently aggrieved by Holt’s attempts to fact-check the Republican candidate on the legality of stop-and-frisk and whether he initially supported the Iraq War.

  • Debate scorecard: How Clinton and Trump compared on six key presidential qualities
    Andrew Romano

    Debate scorecard: How Clinton and Trump compared on six key presidential qualities

    You could, if you were so inclined, distill Monday’s marquee clash between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University to a single iconic incident: Trump sniffling several times per sentence, perhaps, or Clinton debuting a new dance move.

  • Preparation pays off for Clinton in debate matchup
    Garance Franke Ruta

    Preparation pays off for Clinton in debate matchup

    Donald Trump is the king of declaratory moral judgments. This is particularly true when it comes to judgments about his presidential rival, Hillary Clinton. “She can’t bring it home,” he said in the spin room after the first presidential debate Monday in Hempstead, N.Y.  “She doesn’t have what it takes to make America great again,” he observed wearily at another point.

  • Clinton campaign takes victory lap after debate
    Liz Goodwin

    Clinton campaign takes victory lap after debate

    Well I sure do,” Hillary Clinton told a crowd of supporters at a debate watch party in Westbury, N.Y., Monday night after her hour and a half head-to-head with Donald Trump. Meanwhile, in the “spin room” at Hofstra University, her top staffers were taking a victory lap, calling Trump unprepared and erratic and praising Clinton’s performance to the hundreds of reporters still in the arena. “I think he was totally unprepared for this entire debate,” Clinton’s campaign manager, Robby Mook, said.

  • Clinton and her campaign stopped just short of calling Trump a ‘racist’ at the debate
    Hunter Walker

    Clinton and her campaign stopped just short of calling Trump a ‘racist’ at the debate

    During their first presidential debate on Monday night, Democrat Hillary Clinton attacked her Republican rival, Donald Trump, for telling what she described as a “birther lie” that was “racist.” While she used the term “racist” to characterize Trump’s past comments, both Clinton and one of her top aides did not employ the word to describe Trump as a man. Trump spent several years raising questions about the debunked “birther” conspiracy theories claiming President Obama wasn’t born in the U.S. Earlier this month, Trump said he no longer has questions about Obama’s origins after ducking the subject in an interview, embroiling his campaign in new controversy. At the debate, Trump argued he did a “good job” handling the issue and credited himself with pushing Obama to release his birth certificate.

  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton deny their own words in debate
    Associated Press

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Clinton deny their own words in debate

    Donald Trump’s habit of peddling hype and fabrication emerged unabated in the first presidential debate while Hillary Clinton played it cautiously in her statements, though not without error. TRUMP, denying Clinton’s accusation that he supported the Iraq war: “Wrong. THE FACTS: There is no evidence Trump expressed public opposition to the war before the U.S. invaded, despite his repeated insistence that he did.

  • Lester Holt tries, with mixed success, to fact-check the debates
    Lisa Belkin

    Lester Holt tries, with mixed success, to fact-check the debates

    After a week of debate over whether the moderator of the first presidential debate should fact-check answers in addition to asking questions, Lester Holt’s answer was to try, but not always succeed. More than half a dozen times during the debate, Holt interrupted to question a candidate — on all but one occasion, Donald Trump — who he said had gone off track. Holt’s most combative interaction with Trump was over whether the Republican nominee had supported the war in Iraq — which, not coincidentally, was what Lauer was strongly criticized for not challenging.

  • Trump claims his ‘strongest asset’ is ‘my temperament’
    Olivier Knox

    Trump claims his ‘strongest asset’ is ‘my temperament’

    Donald Trump — the brash, tough-talking candidate who memorably mocked his Republican primary opponents with derisive nicknames — declared in his first debate with Hillary Clinton on Monday that his strongest asset, “maybe by far,” is his temperament. “I think my strongest asset, maybe by far, is my temperament.

  • Trump avoids Bill Clinton’s scandals ‘out of respect for Chelsea’
    Jerry Adler and Hunter Walker

    Trump avoids Bill Clinton’s scandals ‘out of respect for Chelsea’

    Going into Monday night’s presidential debate, there was much speculation about whether Donald Trump would raise former President Bill Clinton’s history with women. In the spin room afterward, Yahoo News’ Hunter Walker asked Trump if he was “tempted” to raise the topic, as he has done repeatedly on the campaign trial. “I was, but I decided not to do it out of respect for Chelsea,” Trump replied.

  • Lester Holt calls out Donald Trump on stop-and-frisk in NYC
    Holly Bailey

    Lester Holt calls out Donald Trump on stop-and-frisk in NYC

    Donald Trump reiterated his call for a national stop-and-frisk policy to curb crime in the nation’s inner cities, insisting that African-Americans and Hispanics are “living in hell” because of gun violence. “No, you’re wrong,” Trump interrupted.

  • Diverse cast of characters helped the candidates spin ahead of the debate
    Hunter Walker

    Diverse cast of characters helped the candidates spin ahead of the debate

    A motley crew of allies and aides for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her Republican rival, Donald Trump, appeared in the spin room ahead of their first debate, at Hofstra University on Monday night. Boxing promoter Don King has hit the trail for Trump with an argument aimed at minorities and women who are “left outs” in our society. “Trump brings a refreshing breeze to the climate by beating out the system, which is the real problem in this country … pitting black against white, brown against yellow,” King said.

  • Trump boasts at debate that he did ‘good job’ on birther issue
    Liz Goodwin

    Trump boasts at debate that he did ‘good job’ on birther issue

    Hillary Clinton sharply criticized Donald Trump for pushing a “racist birther lie” about President Obama during a heated exchange at Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University. Moderator Lester Holt asked Trump to explain his yearslong campaign supporting the conspiracy theory questioning Obama’s citizenship and birthplace. “I was the one that got him to produce the birth certificate, and I think I did a good job,” Trump said.

  • Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump exchange fierce blows to kick off debate
    Liz Goodwin

    Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump exchange fierce blows to kick off debate

    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump traded blows on a host of topics in the opening hour of the first presidential debate Monday, with Clinton pinning Trump on his refusal to release his tax returns and Trump painting Clinton as an ineffective politician with no fresh ideas. Debate moderator Lester Holt asked Trump why he’s broken with tradition in not releasing his tax returns.

  • Donald Trump’s sniffling distracts debate watchers
    Jerry Adler

    Donald Trump’s sniffling distracts debate watchers

    Hillary Clinton’s health has been an issue in the campaign, at least since her bout of pneumonia two weeks ago. Donald Trump takes a drink of water during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York.

  • Presidential debate live updates: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off at Hofstra
    Yahoo News Staff

    Presidential debate live updates: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off at Hofstra

    Campaign rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will face off on Monday for the first of three general-election presidential debates, in what is predicted to be one of the most-watched moments in modern political history. And we will be there live!

  • Debate marks latest bump in Mark Cuban and Donald Trump’s roller-coaster relationship
    Colin Campbell

    Debate marks latest bump in Mark Cuban and Donald Trump’s roller-coaster relationship

    Mark Cuban speaks during a moderated conversation at the graduation of the inaugural class of the Presidential Leadership Scholars program. Donald Trump and Mark Cuban’s on-again, off-again relationship is set to reach its nadir at Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., where Cuban will apparently try to rattle Trump by sitting in the front row. Cuban, now a vocal supporter of Hillary Clinton, tweeted last week that he had received a ticket to watch the first debate.

  • Preparations for the presidential debate at Hofstra University
    Yahoo News Photo Staff

    Preparations for the presidential debate at Hofstra University

    Preparations are underway for tonight's presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump will face off at 9 p.m. ET for their first in a series of three debates ahead of the Nov. 8 election. Here’s a look. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.

  • Here’s what people are betting on for the big debate
    Dylan Stableford

    Here’s what people are betting on for the big debate

    Will Donald Trump call Hillary Clinton "crooked"? Will moderator Lester Holt ask Trump about his evolution on the "birther" conspiracy? What color pantsuit will Clinton wear? For political junkies who are feeling lucky, betting on the answers to those questions — and plenty of others — is underway.

  • Donald Trump’s new campaign-trail discipline is about to be tested at debate
    Holly Bailey

    Donald Trump’s new campaign-trail discipline is about to be tested at debate

    Donald Trump has long bragged he can act presidential if he wants to. And, over the last month — with a few exceptions here and there — he has set aside his stream-of-consciousness politicking in favor of a more controlled message.

  • Head of Commission on Presidential Debates: It’s not the moderator’s job to fact-check
    Dylan Stableford

    Head of Commission on Presidential Debates: It’s not the moderator’s job to fact-check

    Hostra University students playing the roles of the candidates and moderator go through a rehearsal for the first presidential debate in Hempstead, N.Y., on Sunday. On the eve of the first presidential debate of the 2016 election, Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, said on Sunday that she doesn’t believe moderators should fact-check the candidates. “I don’t think it’s a good idea to get the moderator into essentially serving as the Encyclopedia Britannica,” Janet Brown, executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates, said in an interview with CNN’s “Reliable Sources” from Hofstra University, where Monday’s debate, moderated by NBC’s Lester Holt, will be held.

  • Clinton campaign launches early voting drive in Latino churches
    Liz Goodwin

    Clinton campaign launches early voting drive in Latino churches

    The Clinton campaign is launching a church-based voter mobilization drive aimed at Latinos called “Fe en Nuestro Voto,” or Faith in our Vote, this month in at least nine states. Sen. Tim Kaine will lead a roundtable with faith leaders in Orlando Monday to kick off the program aimed at boosting turnout among Latinos, who overwhelmingly back Hillary Clinton over her rival Donald Trump but have historically turned out in lower numbers than white or black voters. In Virginia, Iowa, Florida, Nevada and North Carolina, Clinton campaign organizers will descend upon Latino churches and encourage parishioners to register to vote during “Domingos de Acción” — Sundays of action.