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  • Debate scorecard: how Clinton and Trump compared on six key presidential qualities
    Andrew Romano

    Debate scorecard: how Clinton and Trump compared on six key presidential qualities

    No one expected Trump — a political novice who has shown little tolerance for debate prep or policy briefings — to display a greater command of the issues than a former first lady, senator, and secretary of state.

  • Preparation pays off for Clinton in debate match-up
    Garance Franke Ruta

    Preparation pays off for Clinton in debate match-up

    Donald Trump is the king of declaratory moral judgments. This is particularly true when it comes to judgments about his presidential rival, Hillary Clinton. “She can’t bring it home,” he said in the spin room after the first presidential debate Monday in Hempstead, New York.  “She doesn’t have what it takes to make America great again,” he observed wearily at another point.

  • Clinton campaign takes victory lap after debate
    Liz Goodwin

    Clinton campaign takes victory lap after debate

    In the “spin room” at Hofstra University, Hillary Clinton's top staffers took a victory lap after the debate, calling Trump unprepared and erratic and praising Clinton’s performance to the hundreds of reporters still in the arena.

  • Clinton and her campaign stopped just short of calling Trump a ‘racist’ at the debate
    Hunter Walker

    Clinton and her campaign stopped just short of calling Trump a ‘racist’ at the debate

    During their first presidential debate on Monday night, Democrat Hillary Clinton attacked her Republican rival, Donald Trump, for telling what she described as a “birther lie” that was “racist.” While she used the term “racist” to characterize Trump’s past comments, both Clinton and one of her top aides did not employ the word to describe Trump as a man. Trump spent several years raising questions about the debunked “birther” conspiracy theories claiming President Obama wasn’t born in the U.S. Earlier this month, Trump said he no longer has questions about Obama’s origins after ducking the subject in an interview, embroiling his campaign in new controversy. At the debate, Trump argued he did a “good job” handling the issue and credited himself with pushing Obama to release his birth certificate.

  • Lester Holt tries, with mixed success, to fact-check the debates
    Lisa Belkin

    Lester Holt tries, with mixed success, to fact-check the debates

    After a week of debate over whether the moderator of the first presidential debate should fact-check answers in addition to asking questions, Lester Holt’s answer was to try, but not always succeed. More than half a dozen times during the debate, Holt interrupted to question a candidate — on all but one occasion, Donald Trump — who he said had gone off track. Holt’s most combative interaction with Trump was over whether the Republican nominee had supported the war in Iraq — which, not coincidentally, was what Lauer was strongly criticized for not challenging.

  • Trump claims his ‘strongest asset’ is ‘my temperament’
    Olivier Knox

    Trump claims his ‘strongest asset’ is ‘my temperament’

    Donald Trump — the brash, tough-talking candidate who memorably mocked his Republican primary opponents with derisive nicknames — declared in his first debate with Hillary Clinton on Monday that his strongest asset, “maybe by far,” is his temperament. “I think my strongest asset, maybe by far, is my temperament.

  • Trump avoids Bill Clinton’s scandals ‘out of respect for Chelsea’
    Jerry Adler and Hunter Walker

    Trump avoids Bill Clinton’s scandals ‘out of respect for Chelsea’

    Going into Monday night’s presidential debate, there was much speculation about whether Donald Trump would raise former President Bill Clinton’s history with women. In the spin room afterwards, Yahoo News’ Hunter Walker asked Trump if he was “tempted” to raise the topic, as he has done repeatedly on the campaign trial. “I was, but I decided not to do it out of respect for Chelsea,” Trump replied.

  • Lester Holt calls out Donald Trump on stop and frisk in NYC
    Holly Bailey

    Lester Holt calls out Donald Trump on stop and frisk in NYC

    Donald Trump reiterated his call for a national stop-and-frisk policy to curb crime in the nation’s inner cities, insisting that African-Americans and Hispanics are “living in hell” because of gun violence. “No, you’re wrong,” Trump interrupted.

  • Diverse cast of characters helped the candidates spin ahead of the debate
    Hunter Walker

    Diverse cast of characters helped the candidates spin ahead of the debate

    A motley crew of allies and aides for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her Republican rival, Donald Trump, appeared in the spin room ahead of their first debate, at Hofstra University on Monday night. Boxing promoter Don King has hit the trail for Trump with an argument aimed at minorities and women who are “left outs” in our society. “Trump brings a refreshing breeze to the climate by beating out the system, which is the really problem in this country … pitting black against white, brown against yellow,” King said.

  • Trump boasts at debate that he did ‘good job’ on birther issue
    Liz Goodwin

    Trump boasts at debate that he did ‘good job’ on birther issue

    Hillary Clinton sharply criticized Donald Trump for pushing a “racist birther lie” about President Obama during a heated exchange at Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University. Moderator Lester Holt asked Trump to explain his yearslong campaign supporting the conspiracy theory questioning Obama’s citizenship and birthplace. “I was the one that got him to produce the birth certificate, and I think I did a good job,” Trump said.

  • Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump exchange fierce blows to kick off debate
    Liz Goodwin

    Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump exchange fierce blows to kick off debate

    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump traded blows on a host of topics in the opening hour of the first presidential debate Monday, with Clinton pinning Trump on his refusal to release his tax returns and Trump painting Clinton as an ineffective politician with no fresh ideas. Debate moderator Lester Holt asked Trump why he’s broken with tradition in not releasing his tax returns.

  • Donald Trump's sniffling distracts debate watchers
    Jerry Adler

    Donald Trump's sniffling distracts debate watchers

    Hillary Clinton’s health has been an issue in the campaign, at least since her bout of pneumonia two weeks ago. Donald Trump takes a drink of water during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York.

  • Presidential debate live updates: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off at Hofstra
    Yahoo News Staff

    Presidential debate live updates: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off at Hofstra

    Campaign rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will face off on Monday for the first of three general-election presidential debates, in what is predicted to be one of the most-watched moments in modern political history. And we will be there live!

  • Debate marks latest bump in Mark Cuban and Donald Trump’s roller-coaster relationship
    Colin Campbell

    Debate marks latest bump in Mark Cuban and Donald Trump’s roller-coaster relationship

    Mark Cuban speaks during a moderated conversation at the graduation of the inaugural class of the Presidential Leadership Scholars program. Donald Trump and Mark Cuban’s on-again, off-again relationship is set to reach its nadir at Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., where Cuban will apparently try to rattle Trump by sitting in the front row. Cuban, now a vocal supporter of Hillary Clinton, tweeted last week that he had received a ticket to watch the first debate.

  • Preparations for the presidential debate at Hofstra University
    Yahoo News Photo Staff

    Preparations for the presidential debate at Hofstra University

    Preparations are underway for tonight's presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump will face off at 9 p.m. ET for their first in a series of three debates ahead of the Nov. 8 election. Here’s a look. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.

  • Here’s what people are betting on for the big debate
    Dylan Stableford

    Here’s what people are betting on for the big debate

    Will Donald Trump call Hillary Clinton "crooked"? Will moderator Lester Holt ask Trump about his evolution on the "birther" conspiracy? What color pantsuit will Clinton wear? For political junkies who are feeling lucky, betting on the answers to those questions — and plenty of others — is under way.

  • Donald Trump’s new campaign-trail discipline is about to be tested at debate
    Holly Bailey

    Donald Trump’s new campaign-trail discipline is about to be tested at debate

    Donald Trump has long bragged he can act presidential if he wants to. And, over the last month — with a few exceptions here and there — he has set aside his stream-of-consciousness politicking in favor of a more controlled message.

  • Head of Commission on Presidential Debates: It’s not the moderator’s job to fact-check
    Dylan Stableford

    Head of Commission on Presidential Debates: It’s not the moderator’s job to fact-check

    Hostra University students playing the roles of the candidates and moderator go through a rehearsal for the first presidential debate in Hempstead, N.Y., on Sunday. On the eve of the first presidential debate of the 2016 election, Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, said on Sunday that she doesn’t believe moderators should fact-check the candidates. “I don’t think it’s a good idea to get the moderator into essentially serving as the Encyclopedia Britannica,” Janet Brown, executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates, said in an interview with CNN’s “Reliable Sources” from Hofstra University, where Monday’s debate, moderated by NBC’s Lester Holt, will be held.

  • Clinton campaign launches early voting drive in Latino churches
    Liz Goodwin

    Clinton campaign launches early voting drive in Latino churches

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, meets with people at an event to speak with young immigrants, or so-called “dreamers” and their families at a campaign office Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016, in Las Vegas. The Clinton campaign is launching a church-based voter mobilization drive aimed at Latinos called “Fe en Nuestro Voto,” or Faith in our Vote, this month in at least nine states. Sen. Tim Kaine will lead a roundtable with faith leaders in Orlando Monday to kick off the program aimed at boosting turnout among Latinos, who overwhelmingly back Hillary Clinton over her rival Donald Trump but have historically turned out in lower numbers than white or black voters.

  • New York Times endorses Hillary Clinton for president
    Michael Walsh

    New York Times endorses Hillary Clinton for president

    The New York Times published a resounding endorsement of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on Saturday — in the hope that it will persuade readers who are reluctant to cast a vote for another Clinton. The paper’s editorial board explained that in any normal election year, it would compare the candidates on the issues side by side, but that it would be a fruitless endeavor this time around. “A comparison like that would be an empty exercise in a race where one candidate — our choice, Hillary Clinton — has a record of service and a raft of pragmatic ideas, and the other, Donald Trump, discloses nothing concrete about himself or his plans while promising the moon and offering the stars on layaway,” the board wrote.

  • Donald Trump’s original apprentice, Louise Sunshine, recalls her ‘magical’ years and the not-so-happy ending
    Lisa Belkin

    Donald Trump’s original apprentice, Louise Sunshine, recalls her ‘magical’ years and the not-so-happy ending

    Louise Sunshine, a powerful real estate developer who worked for Donald Trump for 15 years, starting in the ’70s, and rose to executive vice resident of the Trump Organization. Louise Sunshine entered Donald Trump’s orbit when she secured a vanity license plate for him. It was 1974, and Sunshine was the treasurer of the New York State Democratic Committee under the newly elected governor, Hugh Carey, to whom Trump was a significant donor.

  • Let’s go to the tape: Clinton and Trump’s top 10 debate moments
    Jerry Adler

    Let’s go to the tape: Clinton and Trump’s top 10 debate moments

    One of the largest audiences in the history of presidential debates — perhaps the largest ever — is expected to watch when Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face each other for the first time on the same stage. Clinton has a debate history that includes not just her appearances with Bernie Sanders in this cycle, but her epic confrontations with Barack Obama in 2008, all the way back to her campaign for United States senator in 2000. Trump built his winning primary campaign in large measure on his performance in a dozen debates against nine or more rivals since entering the race in 2015.

  • ‘This is a peaceful masjid’: Muslims in Elizabeth, N.J., gather for Friday prayer after resident accused of bombings
    Caitlin Dickson

    ‘This is a peaceful masjid’: Muslims in Elizabeth, N.J., gather for Friday prayer after resident accused of bombings

    Nearly 200 people gathered at the Muslim Community Center of Union County Friday afternoon for the first jumah prayer — Islam’s largest weekly gathering — since Elizabeth resident Ahmad Khan Rahami was arrested in connection to mostly unsuccessful bomb attacks in New York and New Jersey last weekend. Like Faisal, the suspect’s father, Mohammad Rahami, is a longtime member of MCCUC, and is known to pray regularly at the red brick mosque, which sits on the leafy corner of a charming, residential enclave less than two miles from Elizabeth’s gritty downtown.

  • Cruz backs Trump after bitter primary
    Jon Ward

    Cruz backs Trump after bitter primary

    Ted Cruz swallowed his pride and accepted political reality Friday, announcing on Facebook that he will vote for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on Nov. 8. Cruz stopped short of offering a full-throated endorsement. By releasing a written statement Friday afternoon he was able to parse the issue more than if he had made his announcement at a Saturday speaking engagement scheduled in his home state of Texas.

  • Obama vetoes 9/11 lawsuit bill, triggers override fight
    Olivier Knox

    Obama vetoes 9/11 lawsuit bill, triggers override fight

    President Obama speaks at a memorial ceremony at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2016. Risking an election-year public backlash, President Obama on Friday vetoed popular but controversial legislation allowing the relatives of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts. Obama’s rejection of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) sets up what seems likely to be the first-ever successful congressional vote to override his veto.