Ministers consider 'bring a bottle' plan to cut holiday test costs

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Hazel Plush
·24 min read
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Free NHS lateral flow tests are currently offered to everyone in England, but the results are not presently accepted for international travel - Getty
Free NHS lateral flow tests are currently offered to everyone in England, but the results are not presently accepted for international travel - Getty

The Transport Secretary has hinted that free NHS tests could be used to facilitate international travel in the future, ending the need for holidaymakers to purchase notoriously expensive PCR tests.

Speaking at an industry webinar yesterday evening, Grant Shapps said that travellers may be able to “[take] the lateral flow tests, potentially, that they already have access to from home.”

The statement appears to suggest that holidaymakers could be permitted to use free NHS tests to obtain ‘fit to fly’ certificates, instead of PCR devices which currently cost an average of £128 per test. The twice-weekly NHS lateral flow tests are currently offered to everyone in England as part of the Government’s plans to ease lockdown, but the results are not presently accepted for international travel.

Travellers may also be permitted to use NHS test results to re-enter England after their holiday. “We are looking at things like whether people can take their tests away,” he added. “A sort of Covid version of 'bring your own bottle' when you go on holiday.”

However, Mr Shapps confirmed that PCR tests would be required for the foreseeable future. “For the time being, the PCR test gets us closer to the truth about somebody's Coronavirus and for the time being that's the one that's going to be required.”

Scroll down for more on this, and other breaking travel news.

04:28 PM

That's all for today

Before we go, here's a re-cap of today's main headlines:

  • Shapps confirms ‘green watchlist’

  • Greek, Spanish and Portuguese islands could open early to British tourists for summer holidays

  • France trials digital Covid travel certificate

  • Airlines are running out of cash, warns Emirates boss

  • Asian countries step closer to reopening for tourism

04:19 PM

Forget the Greek islands – head for the Athenian Riviera instead

Glinting in the warm morning sun our sleek silver tram swished past blue-tabled kafenions, exhaust pipe repair shops and chic boutiques selling flouncy frocks, writes Heidi Fuller-Love. I caught one last glimpse of The Acropolis and then we were out onto a smaller road and heading for the beach.

Stretching from chic yachties hangout Palaio Faliro to the marble-pillared splendour of Cape Sounion, the Athenian Riviera has to be one of the city’s best kept secrets.

Just half an hour’s tram ride – or 20 minutes in a taxi – from vintage tat in Monastiraki’s flea market and The Changing of the Guards in Syntagma Square, you’ll find this little-known 30 kilometre stretch of coastline lapped by the sheltered cobalt waters of the Saronic Gulf. Lined with Blue Flag beaches, stylish bars and feet-in-the-water fish tavernas, the Athenian Riviera makes the perfect base for a city break without the crowds.

Read the full article

athenian riviera - Getty
athenian riviera - Getty

04:08 PM

Hurtigruten announces extra UK voyages this summer

Norwegian cruise line Hurtigruten has added two more sailings to its UK programme this summer.

The British Isles: Picturesque Ports, Isolated Islands and Wonderful Wildlife cruise, a 15-day voyage out of Dover, has new departure dates for July 18 and August 27, with bookings now open.

Operated by the 532-capacity MS Mauda, the itinerary includes a voyage up the western side of Britain and around the Hebrides, with stops in Fowey, the Isles of Scilly, Holyhead, Stornoway and Fort William among others.

Anthony Daniels, general manager at Hurtigruten UK and EMEA, said: “With so many staycation sailings to choose from, we offer something truly different to British travellers who want adventure, excursions and space.

“We not only have our incredible expedition team to bring the places we venture to, to life, but our small expedition ship Maud can reach destinations the big white ships cannot get to, whilst still offering plenty of space to relax and dine onboard.

“We will create a unique perspective of the British Isles coastline that is hard to match, and we look forward to welcoming our frequent and new guests onboard.”

03:47 PM

Varadkar puts dampener on Irish holiday hopes

Tanaiste Leo Varadkar has said June is 'too soon' for fully vaccinated people in Ireland to consider summer holidays.

Irish government ministers are set to meet next week to discuss plans on easing lockdown restrictions, but Mr Varadkar warned today that any changes to travel advice are likely to be gradual, and even the current ban on domestic travel my still be in place by the beginning of summer.

“To anyone who is booking fair enough but make sure that you look at the terms and conditions and that it’s refundable if inter-county travel is not possible," he said.

“This virus keeps surprising us and June is a long way away and six weeks is a long time away in a pandemic.”

03:30 PM

Thousands enter Iceland within first two weeks of reopening

Almost 5,000 tourists entered Iceland in the first two weeks of April, with 1,106 of them carrying Covid-19 travel certificates.

The Nordic nation reopened its borders for 'non-essential' travel on April 6, and there have been encouraging signs since then that its previously thriving tourism industry looks set for a recovery.

Visitors from within the Schengen Area are not currently required to submit any documentation regarding their Covid history (although they must still take a PCR test on arrival); those travelling from countries outside the zone, including the UK, US and Canada, must show proof of a vaccine or previous Covid infection.

Iceland's seven-day caseload is currently just six per 100,000 people, and with almost 20% of the population having now received their first dose of the vaccine, it is a strong contender for the UK's holiday 'green list' this summer.

02:59 PM

Around the world in pictures

Men dressed as Hindu deities from the epic Ramayan sanitise their hands before going on a public awareness campaign against the spread of Covid-19, on the occasion of the Hindu festival 'Ram Navami', in Bangalore - AFP via Getty
Men dressed as Hindu deities from the epic Ramayan sanitise their hands before going on a public awareness campaign against the spread of Covid-19, on the occasion of the Hindu festival 'Ram Navami', in Bangalore - AFP via Getty
Detail of the head of the Christ The Protector Statue which is under construction in Encantado, Brazil. The statue will surpass the iconic Christ The Redeemer of Rio de Janeiro by five metres. - Getty Images South America
Detail of the head of the Christ The Protector Statue which is under construction in Encantado, Brazil. The statue will surpass the iconic Christ The Redeemer of Rio de Janeiro by five metres. - Getty Images South America
Also in Brasil, an indigenous man wears a protective mask during a protest against President Jair Bolsonaro's mining politics regarding indigenous lands, and demanding Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles' resignation, outside the Ministry of the Environment in Brasilia. - Getty
Also in Brasil, an indigenous man wears a protective mask during a protest against President Jair Bolsonaro's mining politics regarding indigenous lands, and demanding Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles' resignation, outside the Ministry of the Environment in Brasilia. - Getty
Photographed from above, thousands of abandoned public shared bicycles lie rusting in Shenyang, in China's northeastern Liaoning province. - Getty
Photographed from above, thousands of abandoned public shared bicycles lie rusting in Shenyang, in China's northeastern Liaoning province. - Getty

02:40 PM

Cambridge to launch a-moo-zing art trail

A cow enjoys a punt on the River Cam - Richard Marsham - RMG Photograph
A cow enjoys a punt on the River Cam - Richard Marsham - RMG Photograph

Cambridge has announced the launch of its long-awaited outdoor art trail, Cows About Cambridge. Featuring 85 decorated bovine sculptures, the trail will open on June 28 and remain on display throughout the city for ten weeks.

The fibreglass cows have been painted by local artists, community groups and schools, and were modelled on the Red Poll cattle that graze Cambridge meadows. The launch was originally scheduled for March 2020, but was mooved to this summer because of Covid.

02:22 PM

10 things you need to know before joining a round-Britain cruise

A trip to Durdle Door, in Dorset, features on an upcoming Saga itinerary - Getty
A trip to Durdle Door, in Dorset, features on an upcoming Saga itinerary - Getty

British holidaymakers have been quick to snap up the array of UK cruises on offer this summer. Nearly every major cruise line has announced fresh itineraries, from Viking Cruises launching the maiden voyage of its newest ship, sailing from Portsmouth, to Virgin Voyages offering at-sea “staycations” this August.

But there are few things you should know before you go, says Emma Featherstone.

Swot up here.

02:00 PM

Tour operator Intrepid reveals £14 million loss in 2020

Intrepid, the world's biggest adventure travel company, has revealed a pre-tax loss of AU$26.1 million (£14.45 million), caused by the coronavirus travel bans.

The Australian company, whose other brands include Peregrine Adventures and Urban Adventures, had recorded a profit of $21.5 million (£11.9 million) in 2019.

In its annual report, chief executive James Thornton revealed that the company's strategy changed “almost overnight” last year, from running 460,000 trips to suspending all of its leisure travel operations.

“By the end of 2020, we had processed over 43,000 trip credits and returned $21 million in refunds,” he explained. “At the end of 2020, Intrepid’s cash balance was $48 million compared to $87 million at the end of 2019.”

The report continued, “When or how quickly international travel will recover remains unclear, and with governments starting to roll back benefits and wage subsidy schemes, maintaining cash and balance sheet strength will remain critical until travel rebounds.”

01:40 PM

'The universal language of travel is not English – it is football'

From the beaches of Zanzibar to a car park in Cuba, Greg Dickinson is well-versed in the unifying force of football:

On my travels I have found a language that is universal: football. And I’m not talking about ‘Man United’ being the conversational touchstone in every taxi south of Dover. I’m talking about playing the beautiful game itself.

This week, top flight football has seen its darkest hour with the humiliating Super League debacle. But from my travels I know there is something that the greediest club owners can never take away from us. That most simple thrill of kicking a ball about with absolute strangers, far away from home, and celebrating a goal as if you have a crowd of 80,000 cheering fans around you. If that isn’t joie de vivre, I’m not sure what is.

Read the full story.

01:22 PM

Asian countries step closer to reopening for tourism

With the positive news of Bhutan's vaccination progress in recent days comes another indication there are reasons to be hopeful about the possibilities for long-haul travel in the medium to longer-term, writes David Leck.

The tiny mountain kingdom has vaccinated more than half its population in a week, out-performing much richer nations in its roll-out. The news comes as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Nepal and Bali have taken tentative steps towards re-opening borders to inbound tourism.

However, as Nick Pulley – founder of tour operator Selective Asia – explains, there remains a need for both a clear and pragmatic approach.

“We’re not realistically expecting to be sending legions of travellers to the beaches of Thailand or the tea hills of Sri Lanka this year. Many of our clients are telling us they understand the need for caution, but they would like to know that – if they can’t travel in 2021 – they can at least look to early 2022 with some confidence.

Sri Lanka - Getty
Sri Lanka - Getty

“As a team, we’ve found Sri Lanka has been particularly impressive in its preparation. Nepal has opened and Bali hopes to unlock its borders in July 2021. Thailand has also set out its plans for the coming months, although it is now having to deal with a vaccination roll-out programme slower than some of its neighbours',” adds Pulley.

“And, if you take somewhere such as Bali as an example, it lends itself to travel of a more secluded style such as sailing holidays, as do the more remote areas of the countries we feature like trekking in Nepal and the island idylls of the Maldives.”

01:02 PM

The seven destinations likely to feature on the holiday 'green list' this summer

The Government has confirmed that a ‘traffic light system’ will be unveiled to kickstart holidays in 2021, writes Greg Dickinson.

Countries will be categorised as "red", "amber" or "green" depending on the proportion of its population that has been vaccinated, its infection rates, the prevalence of variants of concern and its capacity to sequence their genomes.

Under the Government’s roadmap, international holidays will be able to resume as early as May 17, with the green list likely to be unveiled as late as May 10.

The Government has, as yet, given no clear indication as to which countries will be green, amber or red, but Telegraph Travel has crunched the numbers to assess which destinations look highly likely to get the go-ahead for the green list.

These are the top contenders

Gibraltar will almost certainly get the 'green light' this summer - Getty
Gibraltar will almost certainly get the 'green light' this summer - Getty

12:48 PM

Manchester Airport chiefs call for test-free travel between 'safest' countries

Bosses at Manchester Airport have urged the Government to add a fourth category to its travel traffic light system, allowing test-free travel for passengers arriving from countries with low Covid infection rates.

The senior figures in the Manchester Airports Group (MAG), which also owns London Stansted and East Midlands airports, argued that "plotting a path to restriction-free travel" is vital for saving the country's struggling aviation sector.

Charlie Cornish, CEO of MAG said: "The UK government is among the first to have set out proposals for a system that enables international travel to resume and should be applauded for taking the lead.

"The requirement to complete a PCR test on return from even the safest countries adds potentially unnecessary cost and the government’s attention must now turn to finding smarter and more affordable ways to manage the risk posed by new variants of concern."

MAG recently revealed that it served just 140,000 passengers in March 2021, down 97% on the four million passengers who passed through its airports in March 2019.

The company has made 465 staff redundant since the start of the pandemic, and is currently in consultation over a further 138 job cuts.

12:31 PM

The best UK canal boat holidays to book now – before they sell out

With an increasing number of Britons turning their attention to the UK for their summer holidays, a canal boat holiday is surely among the most appealing options.

You can embrace ‘slow travel’ while discovering portions of the country that you may never have considered – and you’ll wonder why you didn't try it sooner. Social distancing is a doddle on the more than 2,000 miles of inland waterways that you can drift along, and when the ‘rule of six’ returns, families can spread themselves across a number of boats – reuniting in their own private navy.

Here are some of the UK’s best routes for a canal boat holiday this year.

The United Kingdom's waterways open up parts of the country you may never have thought to explore - Getty
The United Kingdom's waterways open up parts of the country you may never have thought to explore - Getty

12:14 PM

Trans-Tasman travel bubble not to blame for Auckland airport case

A Covid-19 case detected at Auckland airport in New Zealand is not linked to the country's new travel bubble with Australia, authorities have confirmed.

The virus, contracted by a cleaner specialising in planes arriving from high-risk countries, has instead been traced to a passenger arriving from Ethiopia, who is now in quarantine.

Others who have been in contact with both carriers have been tested and isolated.

The discovery came just days after the quarantine-free bubble opened, sparking fears that new-found travel freedoms would be abruptly curtailed again.

New Zealand’s Covid-19 minister, Chris Hipkins, has since clarified the circumstances in which the two countries might abandon the bubble, citing “unidentified community transmission cases” as the chief cause for concern.

“Where it's a link to a border worker, if that spreads further by one or two cases and we can contain those and contain their close contacts, that's not the sort of thing that would need to disrupt trans-Tasman travel,” he said.

11:59 AM

Vaccine race: the European islands most likely to welcome Britons this summer

Capri, in the Bay of Naples, is aiming to complete its vaccinations early - Getty
Capri, in the Bay of Naples, is aiming to complete its vaccinations early - Getty

The possibility of an island getaway has been given a boost further this week, after Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said each isle would be considered for travel independent of its mainland partner: opening the door to potential trips to the likes of Majorca, but not Madrid; Santorini but not Athens.

But which islands could be back on the map – and will they achieve it in time for summer holidays?

Hugh Morris investigates.

11:42 AM

'Ramblers are the scourge of the countryside'

They are noisy, obnoxious and tedious, writes Chris Moss. Whatever happened to the Wordsworthian ideal of enjoying our own company in inspiring solitude?

Do you see the silver-topped heads wagging and nodding over the swaying hay, the functional hats and caps climbing a stile in the nearest dry stone wall? Did you not hark the unmistakeable murmur of opinion, contradiction, emphatic enthusing, platitude and pseudo-expert observation floating on the sweet breeze?

What am I talking about? As if you didn’t know. I’m talking about ramblers – those gangs of Millets and Cotswold-garbed retirees who, walking poles in hand, legs in metronomic rhythm and OS maps a-swinging in waterproof neck-bag, are wont to intrude on almost every quiet trek, reflective moment and idyllic “solitude”, wherever you may choose to take your boots and jam butties.

Read on, and tell us: do you agree?

11:26 AM

The view around England today

Paper artist Rich McCor (aka Paperboyo) captures the excitement of a reopening London, in association with Sony - Rich McCor
Paper artist Rich McCor (aka Paperboyo) captures the excitement of a reopening London, in association with Sony - Rich McCor
The tulip fields of King's Lynn are in full bloom - PA
The tulip fields of King's Lynn are in full bloom - PA
Gardener Danielle Falkingham prepares the lawns and flower beds of 17th-century Asthall Manor in Oxfordshire for its tenth biennial sculpture show, OnForm - Russell Sach
Gardener Danielle Falkingham prepares the lawns and flower beds of 17th-century Asthall Manor in Oxfordshire for its tenth biennial sculpture show, OnForm - Russell Sach

11:13 AM

Macron considers easing French travel restrictions

President Macron is planning to ease travel restrictions and lift a nationwide curfew on May 2 on the expectation that coronavirus cases will soon begin to fall, a source close to the presidency said.

Mr Macron is also expected to allow restaurants to serve diners outdoors from mid-May, while cinemas, theatres and museums will also be permitted to reopen with reduced capacity.

The French president imposed a strict lockdown on April 3 to contain a third wave of the virus that pushed hospitals to the brink. People are currently only permitted to travel 10 kilometres from thier homes and a 7pm curfew is in place.

Macron also ordered the closure of schools, but nursery and primary school students are set to return on Monday. He is set to chair a meeting with his top health officials today to evaluate the state of the virus in France.

He is hoping that the number of daily cases will fall to around 20,000 within a month, and that France will meet its target of vaccinating 20 million people with at least one dose by mid-May, according to the source.

This week, the country becomes the first EU member state to trial a digital Covid travel pass, accessed via the TousAntiCovid app. See the story below for details (10.22am).

10:54 AM

Why a cruise around Britain should be your first post-lockdown holiday (and the best ports to visit)

Oban's harbour, overlooked by McCaig's Tower - iStock
Oban's harbour, overlooked by McCaig's Tower - iStock

With the news that cruises in UK waters will be allowed from May 17, several cruise lines – including Princess Cruises, Viking and P&O Cruises – plan to offer domestic sailings. These trips offer passengers a novel opportunity to gain a new perspective on the British Isles.

It’s a type of cruise which has been growing in popularity in recent years, and given our appetite for it – in 2018, the number of ocean cruises taken by UK and Irish passengers exceeded two million for the first time, according to industry body CLIA – that’s not surprising. Guernsey, a common staging post, disappointed many by banning ships until 2022, but fear not: there are plenty of other spectacular stop-offs to look forward to...

Tamara Hinson lists the UK's top cruise spots.

10:35 AM

'I found my gap year journal, and my mother was right to be worried'

Nudity, dares and overdoses – reading the diary I kept as an 18-year-old in Thailand was amusing, but also horrifying, writes Annabel Fenwick-Elliott.

Read it yourself, here.

10:18 AM

Qantas quotes £547 million for flight upgrade

Flight upgrades can be expensive, yes, but one Qantas passenger has been quoted AU$987,999,999 (£547,212,867) for a little extra legroom.

Dave O’Neil opted for the upgrade for flights between Melbourne and Perth – but took to Twitter when he saw the price:

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A Qantas rep responded, "Hmmm…does look slightly over the normal price," before offering to investigate further. An airline spokesperson later confirmed that O’Neil was eventually charged just £70 per flight for the extra legroom.

That's quite the discount.

09:59 AM

Battle in 'fair Verona' over Juliet's balcony

A couple kisses on the balcony of Juliet's House in Verona, overlooking the courtyard - Getty
A couple kisses on the balcony of Juliet's House in Verona, overlooking the courtyard - Getty

Forget the feud between the Capulets and the Montagues – a battle is being waged over the courtyard and balcony in “fair Verona” where Romeo is supposed to have wooed Juliet.

Before the pandemic killed tourism stone dead, the balcony and courtyard – part of a gothic stone palazzo known as Juliet’s House – were a hugely popular tourist attraction in the city in northern Italy.

Now, anticipating the return of tourist hordes once the pandemic eases, Verona city council wants to install turnstiles at the entrance to the courtyard to avoid the unseemly overcrowding that marred the attraction for years.

Officials also want to set up an online booking system to regulate the flow of tourists – but the plans have caused uproar in the city.

Nick Squires has the story.

09:39 AM

Airlines are running out of cash, warns Emirates boss

The UAE will not lose its 'red list' status any time soon because Dubai Airport (pictured) is a global travel hub, says Grant Shapps - Getty
The UAE will not lose its 'red list' status any time soon because Dubai Airport (pictured) is a global travel hub, says Grant Shapps - Getty

Sir Tim Clark, President of Emirates, has warned of an impending crisis in the aviation industry if leisure travel does not return with vigour this year.

Speaking at the World Aviation Festival Virtual, Clark said that airlines had assumed leisure travel would resume sooner than planned:

We believed quite firmly late last year that by April/May we would start seeing an uptick in demand. Clearly that has not happened to the extent we would have wanted.

We are good for another six, seven, eight months in terms of cash, but if in six months global demand is where it is today, we are all going to face difficulties, not just Emirates.

His comments come as Transport Secretary Grant Shapps explained that the UAE – home of Emirates – remains on the UK's red list because it is an international travel hub (see post below).

Clark added that Emirates was currently flying all of its 151 Boeing 777 aircraft – but that the flights were mostly carrying cargo.

09:22 AM

France trials digital Covid travel certificate

France has begun trialling a digital coronavirus travel certificate, which will be used to facilitate international travel from this week.

The country's contact tracing app, TousAntiCovid, is now able to store Covid test result certificates on users' smart phones – and the technology will reportedly be trialled on flights to Corsica this week.

France is the first European Union member state to commence such a scheme, and it is believed that the system will eventually be extended to foreign holidays and public events.

France's Covid tracking app - Shutterstock
France's Covid tracking app - Shutterstock

09:05 AM

The real reason why Dubai is on the 'red list'

The Transport Secretary had plenty to say about holidays at last night's ConservativeHome webinar.

In addition to his comments about lateral flow testing, the 'green watchlist' and the appetite for a UK-US travel corridor (see below), he also revealed why the UAE is currently on our red list.

It's because Dubai and Abu Dhabi are global transport hubs – not because the country itself has a high case rate. He explained:

We are not restricting UAE because of levels of coronavirus in the UAE. The specific issue in the UAE is one of transit. It’s because they are a major transit hub.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre can work wonders studying all this detail, but eventually you get to the point where they are having to make too many assumptions about where people are travelling to/from.

And that is specific issue we have with the UAE as opposed to prevalence or some other reason.

As such, it looks unlikely that the UAE will be removed from the list of banned countries, despite its high vaccination rate and low number of cases.

The Government is set to reveal its 'traffic light' system to restart travel in early May.

08:45 AM

Beach hut sells for £325k as demand soars ahead of staycation summer

Mudeford, where some beach huts are selling for £325,000 - Helen Hotson / Alamy Stock Photo
Mudeford, where some beach huts are selling for £325,000 - Helen Hotson / Alamy Stock Photo

The price of beach huts has risen 41pc in the last year to an average of £36,034, according to hotel booking website Hoo.

Three beach huts in Mudeford, Dorset, one of those most sought-after areas, recently sold at an asking price of £325,000, which is higher than the average price of a house in the UK.

Andy Denison, of Denisons estate agents, which sold the huts, said there is now a waiting list of prospective buyers for beach huts. "This is the highest we've ever seen for prices and demand. Interest has gone through the roof with restrictions against travelling abroad still in place," he added.

Mr Denison said buyers were mainly purchasing beach huts for personal use, but there has also been a spike in those looking to profit.

Rachel Mortimer investigates.

08:23 AM

Greek, Spanish and Portuguese islands could open early to British tourists for summer holidays

Asked if he would incorporate the “islands policy” into his traffic light system, Shapps said: “The simple answer is yes" - Getty
Asked if he would incorporate the “islands policy” into his traffic light system, Shapps said: “The simple answer is yes" - Getty

Greek, Spanish and Portuguese islands could be opened up early for summer holidays as part of the Government’s “traffic light” plans for resuming international travel, Grant Shapps has indicated.

The Transport Secretary said islands with lower Covid rates than the mainland could be granted “green list” status for holidaymakers to travel to them without facing quarantine on their return.

Greece has mounted a major campaign to fully vaccinate people living on 85 islands with more than 10,000 inhabitants by May so that they are Covid-free when the UK Government is due to lift its ban on non-essential foreign travel.

Other islands such as the Canaries, Madeira and the Azores have lower Covid rates than Spain and Portugal, which could mean they are granted green list status before their mainland counterparts.

Asked whether he would incorporate the “islands policy” into his traffic light system at a webinar organised on Tuesday night by Airlines UK, Mr Shapps said: “The simple answer is yes. I want to do that again.”

Charles Hymas has the full story.

08:13 AM

Shapps confirms ‘green watchlist’

The Transport Secretary has also confirmed plans for a ‘green watchlist’, with the aim of avoiding last-minute changes to the ‘travel traffic light’ system.

Speaking in last night’s webinar, hosted by ConservativeHome and Airlines UK, Mr Shapps explained:

We’re going to have a Green watchlist to try to give people more of an indication if there are concerns which might lead to quarantine later.

We don’t currently have an Amber watchlist category because people are already required to quarantine.

He also confirmed that vaccination certificates “will of course, be part of international travel”.

07:52 AM

Monday's headlines

Before we begin, here's a quick recap of yesterday's travel news:

  • Desperate scramble for travellers returning from India

  • Border officials detect at least 100 fake Covid certificates every day

  • Israel mulls 'green travel corridor' with the UK

  • The majority of Brits call for quarantine- and test-free travel, survey reveals

  • Two tests before a trip to Scotland’s islands

  • The Break Debate: What actually is a 'staycation'?

  • Boris Johnson: ‘We keep the list under constant review’

Now, on with today's stories.