There Is Now a Permanent Immersive Art Space in New York City

·2 min read

Hall des Lumières, housed in a beaux-arts building by City Hall Park, is bringing immersive art to Manhattan year-round.

<p>Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières</p>

Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières

Immersive art has been trending with pop-up exhibits around the world, featuring the renown works of Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Frida Kahlo, and Leonardo da Vinci. And the newest digital art landmark, Hall des Lumières, opened yesterday, Sept. 14, in New York City.

Inside a historic beaux-arts building at 49 Chamber Street adjacent to City Hall Park, the permanent space will be dedicated to custom immersive art experiences, making its debut with the multi-sensory "Gustav Klimt: Gold in Motion."

<p>Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières</p>

Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières

Once inside, guests will be immersed in 30-foot-high illuminated animations of Klimt’s art, along with an original soundtrack and other sensory elements. They’ll be projected onto the space’s marble walls, towering columns, coved ceiling, and stained glass skylight, creating an unmatched experience that builds upon pop-up exhibits around the world. In fact, Hall des Lumierès co-creator, French arts company Culturespaces, worked with Gianfranco Iannuzzi, who has designed several other trending immersive art exhibits featuring the works of Van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The main exhibit at Hall des Lumières will rotate out every 10 to 12 months.

<p>Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières</p>

Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières

<p>Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières</p>

Mark Zhelezoglo/Courtesy of Hall des Lumières

Also on display is a shorter experience by Austrian painter Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who inspired much of KIimt’s works. Visitors can also experience a creation called "5 Movements" from interdisciplinary studio Nohlab and a mirrored infinity room showing a film called "Recoding Entropia" by François Vautier, reflecting on the vastness of the mind’s possibilities.

Open seven days a week with timed entry, admission starts at $30 for adults, $15 for children 5 to 16, and $28 for seniors 65 and older. A family package is also available for $75 that admits two adults and two children. Book your tickets here.