The No-Plumbing-Required Water Filter That Actually Looks Good

·3 min read
Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare
Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare


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The not-so-eco-friendly Californian in me secretly enjoyed nothing more than the luxury of driving home from Trader Joes with an overpriced case of water bottles in my trunk. Now I live in a NYC walk-up apartment—there are too many floors to even tell you—and I haven't seen a case of water since. I like to tell people I’m becoming more sustainable. Or we can call it what it is: lazy.

I opted for the usual Brita, and it’s fine, just fine. As someone who dreads the constant refill and spills five out of ten times when pouring a glass, pitchers just aren't for me. But seemingly they are the most practical option for city dwellers. While I could probably use one forever, I hate settling for less, and thrive in searching for better. Better for me is defined by being both simple, yet stylish, which is often hard to find in practical home items. When I say simple, I mean like "button on a fridge" simple, and clearly my walk-up didn’t come with the newest smart fridge.

Every Google search led me to a fancy-looking reverse osmosis water filtration system that is supposed to make your life better for X, Y, and Z reasons. But the second I saw the “plumbing required” fine-print, I instantly exited my browser window and drank from my Brita. I then discovered The Reservoir through one of my most tech-savy friends. I haven't touched a pitcher since.

Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare
Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare

What Makes It Better?

The biggest hangup for me with a device like this is that I’m a tried-and-true minimalist (aside from loving plastic water bottles) and don't want just another appliance on display. I’m a firm believer that if it doesn’t look good, it belongs in a cupboard (I also clearly don’t have children). But the Reservoir passes the style test in my book. At first, I resentfully put it on display to stay hydrated. Now, as it turns out, I really don’t hate it.

As for the specs, they speak for themselves. Aside from the sleek look, the filtration system sets itself apart from competitor brands because it's made from compressed coconut husks that create a micropore structure to filter the water. Translation from brand jargon: It's a more plant-based way to filter H2O. Most pitcher filters use a gravity-fed charcoal filters, which not only have a weird taste, but are also less effective. To be exact, The Reservoir system traps 76 more contaminants, including heavy metals and chemicals, compared to charcoal-based filters. It lasts long too; the filter can purify up to 390 gallons of water before it needs replacing.

SHOP $199, amazon.com

Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare
Photo credit: Timothy Mulcare

Why It's Worth the Upgrade

You simply plug it in, fill it up, and press a button, which is all I wanted. Someone even told me they have one on their nightstand (kind of genius, right?). It holds two liters of water at a time, which I'm finding myself going through quicker than usual just because of the pure convenience.

It meets both the style and practicality bill, but for me the best part was almost a surprise: the taste. I am one of those people who tastes water, and the difference between a Smart Water and Fiji is blatantly obvious to me. This tastes clean, fresh, and not like it's being run through a cheap plastic system. My only hangup is that while I like room temperature water, I wish the base had a chilling feature, so you could have slightly colder water if you wanted. Still, all in all, this is the most worthy upgrade I could find, and I have zero regrets.

The best part: it's on sale for Amazon Prime Day 2022, so get it while you can for 20% off.

SHOP $199, amazon.com

Photography by Timothy Mulcare. Prop styling John Olson for Halley Resources.

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