Which MLB Ballpark Has the Best Craft Beer? We Ranked All 30.

·16 min read
Ballpark beer
Ballpark beer

Baseball and beer are one of life’s most classic combinations, and if you’re anything like us, you’ve spent the last 15 months fantasizing about the day finally you’re able to safely crack open a cold one while soaking up the sun at a crowded ballpark. After more than a year of brutal isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there’s perhaps no sweeter sign that things are beginning to get back to normal than watching thousands and thousands of fans return to support their teams in person and yes, toss back a few overpriced stadium beers.

Thankfully, that’s our reality now, as more and more teams lift their mask requirements for vaccinated fans and announce their return to 100 percent capacity crowds. With that in mind, we’re celebrating by ranking all 30 major league parks based on their craft beer selections. For the purposes of this list, we took into consideration each stadiun’s selection of local brews, the overall amount and variety of craft options, affordability and accessibility within the park. The pandemic is almost over, and so are your days of spending $15 on a Bud Light at a game. (Unless, of course, you happen to be a Yankee fan.) Check out the complete ranking below.

30. Yankee Stadium (New York Yankees)

Yankee Stadium is notorious for having the worst beer selection in all of Major League Baseball, and unfortunately, that reputation is entirely deserved. Despite being located in one of the best beer cities in the country, the home of the Bronx Bombers barely offers any local options, save for a few brews from Bronx Brewing and Blue Point. Good luck finding them, though; for the most part, it’s overpriced macrobrews as far as the eye can see.

29. Dodger Stadium (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Don’t get us wrong, there’s a decent amount of good craft beer options at Dodger Stadium, but there’s not a whole lot of variety — most of them will be some type of Golden Road brew (like perhaps their Dodger Blonde Ale, which is brewed specifically for the stadium). Depending on where your seats are, you’re probably going to have to walk a bit to find them, and at $17.50 a pop, they’re pricier than in most other ballparks.

28. Rogers Centre (Toronto Blue Jays)

We should probably put an asterisk on this entry, as it’s worth noting that due to COVID-19 restrictions in Canada, the Blue Jays aren’t actually playing in Rogers Centre this season, setting up shop in Buffalo’s Sahlen Field for the remainder of their 2021 home games. But whenever the Jays return to Toronto, they’ll still have to contend with a pretty dire craft selection at their home park. Despite the fact that you can get a beer for as cheap as $5, there are virtually no craft beers available — although that might be changing soon. In 2019, the team surveyed its season ticket holders to gauge interest in expanding the craft beer selection.

 <div class="cell medium-shrink medium-text-right credit">Gabe Serrano</div>
Gabe Serrano

27. Citi Field (New York Mets)

Oh, how the mighty have fallen. Craft beer fans returning to Citi Field in 2021 might be shocked to discover that the amount of great craft beer options (local and otherwise) in and around the ballpark has taken a huge hit in the wake of the pandemic. Mikkeller Brewing NYC closed in 2020, and McFadden’s will also not reopen (it’s currently being used a vaccination site). The Empire State Craft stands in the 100- and 400-levels that used to feature New York-brewed favorites are also shuttered. Overall, the park’s craft beer selection is currently a shell of what it once was as recently as 2019. Local options like a Brooklyn Pulp Art Hazy IPA will set you back $12.75.

26. Fenway Park (Boston Red Sox)

Being the oldest ballpark in all of Major League Baseball is generally a big selling point for the iconic Fenway Park, but it’s admittedly a bit of a handicap when it comes to the amount of room it has to add new beer stands. You’ll still find local favorites from Harpoon, Wachusett and Narragansett, but overall, we’d love to see more considering how big of a beer town Boston is, and unless you’re planning on missing a few innings walking and waiting in line, you’re probably better off just sticking with the macrobrews here.

25. Globe Life Field (Texas Rangers)

The home of the Rangers is the newest ballpark on this list, having just opened last year, and there’s definitely still room for improvement. The majority of the beers offered at the stadium are macrobrews from Anheuser-Busch, though there are a few local options like 4 Corners, Legal Draft and Bishop Cider as well as standbys from other parts of Texas, like Shiner Bock and Karbach.

24. Marlins Park (Miami Marlins)

Marlins Park’s actually jumped up a few spots in the craft beer rankings recently, thanks to the new addition of the Biscayne Bay Brewing Beer Hall behind home plate. The local brewery is the official craft beer of the Marlins, and they brew a special Marlins Lager (a German-style, 4.8% ABV lager) you can get your hands on at the park. But while the beer hall is a welcome improvement, there’s still more that could be done — specifically, beefing up the amount of craft options that are available throughout the rest of the ballpark — to improve the experience.

23. Chase Field (Arizona Diamondbacks)

There are roughly 20 craft beers available in Chase Field’s Draft Room on the right-field upper level, but it’s not exactly easy to access from the rest of the park. Overall, there are some solid Arizona brews available in the park (we recommend Four Peaks’ Hop Knot IPA), but getting your hands on them can prove challenging depending on where your seats are. Most of the craft beers available in the ballpark will set you back somewhere between $12 and $15.

22. PNC Park (Pittsburgh Pirates)

PNC Park has plenty of regional beers available, including some Pennsylvania brews like Tröegs Perpetual IPA (out of Hershey), Victory Summer Love (out of Downingtown) and of course, Yuengling. But while there’s a pretty solid craft beer selection in the park as a whole, it doesn’t really offer much of anything that’s local to Pittsburgh specifically, so we had to dock some points. They do have a new walk-through beer vendor in section 109 this season, where fans can pick out a can of beer and then place it under a camera, which will identify the brew and give them the price.

21. Wrigley Field (Chicago Cubs)

Cubs fans are notorious for the number of Old Styles they can toss back during a game, but in recent years the club has made an effort to beef up its craft beer menu, adding favorites like 3 Floyds Zombie Dust, Half Acre’s Daisy Cutter and several offerings from Revolution Brewing. But being such an old ballpark — and a National Historic Landmark at that — can make it difficult to add and alter too much, so the major downside here is the craft beer is mostly relegated to certain sections of the park, meaning you’re going to have to walk a while to get it. Who has time for that when you’re working on a massive beer snake?

20. Truist Park (Atlanta Braves)

We’ve got great news if you happen to be a fan of the Athens, Georgia-based Terrapin Beer: it is all over Truist Park, including in the Terrapin Tap Room in the right-field corner and the ATL Brew Lab Terrapin microbrewery attached to the park. The bad news? That’s pretty much the only craft brand you’ll find in most of the ballpark; it’s an excellent option, but we’d love to see a little more variety.

19. Angel Stadium (Los Angeles Angels)

Like PNC Park, Angel Stadium tends to offer more regional beers than local ones, which is sort of fitting given the confusing history of what city this team is actually in. (Remember the “Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim” years?) That said, the beers from elsewhere in California that you’ll find in the park, like Ballast Point, Stone, Modern Times and Saint Archer — which has a tap room in the right field stands with a view of the field — don’t disappoint.

 <div class="cell medium-shrink medium-text-right credit">Gabe Serrano</div>
Gabe Serrano

18. Citizen’s Bank Park (Philadelphia Phillies)

The home of the Phillies boasts some really solid local options thanks to the city’s own Yards Brewing, which is just a 10-minute drive from the park, as well as plenty of offerings from Tröegs and Victory. Outside of local choices, Goose Island also has a strong presence, and in 2019 the park added a new outdoor beer garden, which opens two hours before each game and stays open after the game as well.

17. Busch Stadium (St. Louis Cardinals)

You’d be forgiven for assuming that, given its name, Busch Stadium would be dominated by macrobrews. You’re not completely wrong, of course; if you happen to be a fan of Anheuser-Busch, you’re pretty much guaranteed to always be in the vicinity of a Bud when you’re watching the Cardinals play. (Of course, if you prefer that watered-down swill and love the Cardinals, as a craft beer-loving Cubs fan, I have no choice but to loathe you.) But the park has expanded its craft offerings in recent years, serving up local favorites like 2nd Shift, Schlafly, 4 Hands and Urban Chestnut.

16. Minute Maid Park (Houston Astros)

It goes without saying that you won’t find Departed Soles’ Trash Can Banger beer at Minute Maid Park. But you will find some very strong local options at the park’s very large St. Arnold Brewing Company stand and a Karbach bar upstairs that features an Astros-specific beer called Crawford Bock. A portion of the proceeds from each Crawford Bock goes to the team’s Astros Foundation charity.

15. Coors Field (Colorado Rockies)

Coors Field is another one that, given the macrobrewery it’s named after, might not exactly seem like a craft beer haven. But the home of the Colorado Rockies also includes offerings from New Belgium, Oskar Blues, Breckenridge, and of course, plenty of MillerCoors craft brands like Hop Valley. Since 1995, it’s also been home to the SandLot Brewery, the first brewery to be located inside a major league ballpark.

14. Camden Yards (Baltimore Orioles)

If you’re looking to drink something other than Natty Boh, Camden Yards actually has a decent amount of craft options, including great offerings from Flying Dog, Key Brewing, Monument City and Heavy Seas. It also wins big points for affordability as one of the only ballparks where you can find a premium draft for less than $10.

13. Nationals Park (Washington Nationals)

The local District Drafts stands in Nationals Park feature beers from DC Brau, Atlas, Old Ox, 3 Stars, Port City and more, and they’re now easier to find than ever. For the 2021 season, the park expanded the number of District Drafts locations (formerly five) to 13 throughout the park, making them relatively easy to access no matter where you are. The park also offers happy hour specials that begin two hours prior to scheduled first pitch and ends 30 minutes prior to the first pitch.

12. Oakland Coliseum (Oakland Athletics)

The Oakland Coliseum has plenty of classic California craft brews from the likes Firestone Walker and Sierra Nevada readily available. This season, thanks to COVID-19 precautions, you don’t even have to bother leaving your seat to get them; the ballpark is one of several that are offering mobile ordering from more than 30 of its concession stands. Get it while you can, though: the A’s might not be at the Coliseum for much longer.

11. Tropicana Field (Tampa Bay Rays)

Tropicana Field only has about 10 craft beers on tap, but what it lacks in variety it makes up with quality, thanks to extremely strong local brews from Cigar City, 3 Daughters and Green Bench. (Trust us and go with the Cigar City Jai Alai IPA — a bold, citrusy IPA perfect for nursing through several innings.)

10. Comerica Park (Detroit Tigers)

It should come as no surprise that Michigan’s major league ballpark doesn’t disappoint when it comes to local craft beer. The state is, of course, home to Bell’s, and you can find that brewery’s heavy-hitters like Oberon, Two-Hearted IPA and Hopslam year-round as well as a rotating cycle of 10 limited-release seasonal options. Founders fans also have plenty to cheer for at Comerica Park; it offers four permanent selections from the Grand Rapids-based brewery along with eight limited releases, including the popular Canadian Breakfast Stout.

 <div class="cell medium-shrink medium-text-right credit">Gabe Serrano</div>
Gabe Serrano

9. American Family Field (Milwaukee Brewers)

It still feels weird to refer to Miller Park as “American Family Field,” but even when you take away the name, beer is pretty much everywhere you look here. (When the team is called the Brewers, it better be.) Of course, plenty of it is of the MillerCoors variety, but the park also offers a surprising amount of top-notch local craft options, many of which you can find in the massive Local Brews bar on the Loge Level, including brews from New Glarus, Lakefront, Central Waters and Milwaukee Brewing Company.

8. Target Field (Minnesota Twins)

Target Field offers a pretty robust selection of Minnesota brews, including favorites like Surly, Fair State, Bent Paddle and Summit. The access to it throughout the park is a little hit-or-miss — some stands are closed on certain weekends — but overall, it’s more manageable than most, and you absolutely can’t go wrong sipping on a Surly Furious IPA while taking in a Twins game.

7. Progressive Field (Cleveland Indians)

Progressive Field takes a somewhat unusual approach to its craft beer, breaking the park up into “districts” that represent different neighborhoods of the city with each district featuring breweries local to that area. It’s sort of like a mini tour of the city, with some excellent Great Lakes beers in one part of the park and Fathead’s in another, but don’t fret — if the “districts” concept gets too confusing, you can always find 40 rotating taps at the Corner Bar in right field.

 <div class="cell medium-shrink medium-text-right credit">Gabe Serrano</div>
Gabe Serrano

6. Great American Ballpark (Cincinnati Reds)

Craft beer is pretty much always within reach at Great American Ballpark, thanks in part to the Brewery District, a 72-foot long bar commonly referred to as “The Long Bar” that boasts over 60 taps of local, regional and international beers. It’s surrounded by plenty of TVs to ensure you don’t miss any action while you’re in line, but if the Long Bar still sounds too overwhelming, there are plenty of other areas smattered throughout the park where you can find some satisfying brews.

5. Kauffman Stadium (Kansas City Royals)

Kauffman Stadium is home to one of the best craft beer selections in all of baseball, with pretty much every stand that serves beer featuring at least one craft offering — something that’s more of a rarity than you realize in most ballparks. The Craft & Draft is a must; it features 20 taps pouring local brews, as well as roughly 50 more available in cans and bottles. And if that’s too packed, you can always try the Boulevard Pub behind home plate.

4. Oracle Park (San Francisco Giants)

Given the number of excellent craft beers that have sprung up out of the Bay Area, it should come as no surprise that Oracle Park is chock full of them. You’ll find favorites from Anchor, Russian River, Lagunitas, Temescal Brewing and more, and the park also is connected to the Public House beer bar — which offers 24 rotating beers on tap and over 75 bottles, 80% of which are local — and allows you to carry your beer into the game. The only downside is they can be awfully pricey (but hey, what in San Francisco isn’t these days?).

3. Guaranteed Rate Field (Chicago White Sox)

Earlier this year, it was determined that Chicago White Sox fans drink more alcohol than any other MLB fanbase, a fact that is absolutely not surprising to anyone who has ever spent any time in the Windy City, which is home to the most breweries in America. So it makes sense then that Guaranteed Rate Field would also be home to the one of the biggest beer selections in all of baseball, offering up more than 90 craft brews in its Craft Kave, Revolution Brewing Bar and two Midwest Craft stands. The Craft Kave especially is a treasure trove of canned options, making it easy to transport your beers throughout the park as needed.

2. Petco Park

San Diego is one of the best craft beer cities in the nation, and Petco does an excellent job of highlighting everything it has to offer, serving up a wide variety of local microbrews. There are even two Padres-specific options: Ballast Point’s Swinging Friar, and AleSmith’s .394 Pale Ale, named for Tony Gwynn’s batting average during his fateful 1994 season. The beers will set you back between $10 and $14.50 — pretty standard stadium pricing.

 <div class="cell medium-shrink medium-text-right credit">Gabe Serrano</div>
Gabe Serrano

1. T-Mobile Park (Seattle Mariners)

Like San Diego, Seattle is in the midst of a craft beer boom, and you can find just about every Pacific Northwest craft brew your heart desires at the Mariners’ T-Mobile Park. Elysian, Fremont, even pFriem Family Brewers — it’s all here, and there’s even a stand behind home plate that offers rarer barrel-aged and specialty beers. You don’t even have to worry about spending all your money on booze while you’re at the park; this year the park doubled its Value Beer selection, meaning you can find a significant amount of craft beer cans for just $5 or $6.

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The post Which MLB Ballpark Has the Best Craft Beer? We Ranked All 30. appeared first on InsideHook.

The article Which MLB Ballpark Has the Best Craft Beer? We Ranked All 30. by Bonnie Stiernberg was originally published on InsideHook.