Meghan Markle Was "Frustrated" by the Palace's "No Comment" Policy to False Tabloid Stories

Bianca Betancourt
Photo credit: Max Mumby/Indigo - Getty Images
Photo credit: Max Mumby/Indigo - Getty Images

From Harper's BAZAAR

  • Duchess Meghan was reportedly "frustrated" with how Buckingham Palace didn't openly defend her or deny false tabloid reports about her during her time as a working member of the royal family.

  • The Duchess of Sussex also reportedly "took issue" with the palace's "no comment" policy when they knew stories to be untrue.

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, was reportedly not a fan of Buckingham Palace's approach to handling false tabloid stories, which was to say and do nothing at all.

A source revealed to People that Meghan didn't approve of the palace's signature "no comment" policy when it came to shutting down rumors and stories that circulated in the press. The news of the duchess's frustrations with palace press handlings follows last week's release of a court document, in which it was revealed that the duchess felt "unprotected" by the royal family when it came to insensitive media coverage.

"The go-to position [at the palace] was no comment or to ignore stories, and people actively prevented her from responding to stuff that we knew to be untrue," a source close to Meghan told People. "That is what she is taking issue with."

Photo credit: Gotham - Getty Images
Photo credit: Gotham - Getty Images

Per the aforementioned court document, Meghan experienced "a large number of false and damaging articles by the UK tabloid media," which eventually "caused tremendous emotional distress and damage to her mental health."

Also noted in the filing, "As her friends had never seen her in this state before, they were rightly concerned for her welfare, specifically as she was pregnant, unprotected by the Institution, and prohibited from defending herself."

A source "with close knowledge of the workings of the royal household" claimed to People that the palace's policy to not comment on stories was a traditional media tactic that existed before Meghan's coming into the royal family.

"The palace teams are faced with the difficulty that when things go wrong—particularly on private life matters—quite often any action taken with the media makes it worse," said the source. "It's not that the royal household doesn't want to help—more that they don't want to make it worse by giving a gossipy story more oxygen."

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