LA-based Replicated adds former GitLab head of product as its chief product officer

Hackathlon vector illustration. Flat tiny programmers competition persons concept. Technological IT software coding event process scene. Codefest and hackfest experts community challenge visualization
Hackathlon vector illustration. Flat tiny programmers competition persons concept. Technological IT software coding event process scene. Codefest and hackfest experts community challenge visualization
Jonathan Shieber

Replicated, the Los Angeles-based company pitching monitoring and management services for Kubernetes-based applications, has managed to bring on the former head of product of the $2.75 billion-valued programming giant GitLab as its new chief product officer. 

Mark Pundsack is joining the company as it moves to scale its business. At GitLab, Pundsack saw the company grow from 70 employees to 1,300 as it scaled its business through its on-premise offerings.

Replicated is hoping to bring the same kind of on-premise services to a broad array of enterprise clients, according to company chief executive Grant Miller.

First introduced to Replicated while working with CircleCI, it was the company's newfound traction since the launch of its Kubernetes deployment management toolkit that caused him to take a second look.

“The momentum that Replicated has created with their latest offering is tremendous; really changing the trajectory of the company," said Pundsack in a statement. "When I was able to get close to the product, team, and customers, I knew this was something that I wanted to be a part of. This company is in such a unique position to create value throughout the entire enterprise software ecosystem; this sort of reach is incredibly rare. The potential reminds me a lot of the early days of GitLab.”

It's a huge coup for Replicated, according to Miller.

"Mark created the core product strategy at GitLab; transforming GitLab from a source control company to a complete DevOps platform, with incredible support for Kubernetes," said Miller. "There really isn’t a better background for a product leader at Replicated; Mark has witnessed GitLab’s evolution from a traditional on-prem installation towards a Kubernetes-based installation and management experience. This is the same transition that many of our customers are going through and Mark has already done it with one of the best. I have so much confidence that his involvement with our product will lead to more success for our customers.”

Pundsack is the second new executive hire from Replicated in six months, as the company looks to bring more muscle to its C-suite and expand its operations.

More From

  • Stream, whose APIs help product teams build chat and activity feeds fast, just raised a $15 million Series A round

    "It was really scary when [the virus] initially hit, because a lot of our smaller customers went out of business, which made us worry about what would happen to the larger ones," recalls Thierry Schellenbach, who started Stream with Tommaso Barbugli, the lead engineer at his last startup. Schellenbach understood the impulse  He and Barbugli created Stream to address a pain they felt firsthand at Schellenbach's first company out of college -- a social network that was ultimately acquired for a modest sum by a private equity firm in the Netherlands, says Schellenbach. Schellenbach attributes Stream's resiliency in the pandemic to a decision 10 months ago to also begin developing a chat API (after seeing customers trying to build their own atop their activity feeds).

  • Moka, the HR tool for Arm and Shopee in China, closes $43M Series B

    Investors are betting on the automation of human resources management in China. The startup declined to disclose its investors in the latest round, saying the proceeds will go towards recruitment, product innovation and business expansion. GGV Capital invested in its Series A round.

  • How China's ACRCloud detects copyrighted music in short videos

    Music is front and center in the rise of TikTok and other short-video apps. It's not just the video platforms that are harvesting the fruit of their surging popularity. Music rights holders are also prepared to extract money from the millions of songs found in snappy user-generated videos.

  • ByteDance in talks with India's Reliance for investment in TikTok

    Chinese giant ByteDance is engaging in early discussions with Reliance Industries Limited, the parent firm of telecom giant Jio Platforms, for financially backing TikTok's business in India in a move to potentially save the popular video app's fate in its biggest market by users, two people familiar with the matter told TechCrunch. TikTok's business in India, where it had amassed over 200 million users before it was banned in late June, is being valued at more than $3 billion, one of the sources said. An investment in TikTok could help the oil-to-retails giant Reliance, the most valuable firm in India, make deeper connections with consumers.