Kristen Bell Just Christened Husband Dax Shepard's New Car... By Peeing In It

The Editors
·3 mins read

From Women's Health

  • Dax Shepard just revealed that wife Kristen Bell peed in his new car on Instagram.

  • Kristen later explained that she didn't want to use a public restroom amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Health officials say it's fine to use a public restroom, so long as you wear a mask and wash your hands.

Actor Dax Shepard just got a new car and wants the world to know how his wife Kristen Bell welcomed it into the family: by peeing in it. The "Armchair Expert" podcast host shared a photo of the occasion on Instagram, in which he took a masked selfie in the front seat while The Good Place alum peed into a container on the passenger seat, which she protected with the car's floor mat.

"The most important part of this photo isn't that my bride @kristenanniebell is peeing in the car, it's that the car is 36 hours old!!!! So much disrespect that I almost have to respect it," he wrote in the caption.

If you're wondering why the Frozen star is peeing in the car, look no further than her Instagram Stories. "My husband always outs me," she wrote on Dax's photo shared to her Stories. "I don't eff with public restrooms during a pandemic."

While public health professionals haven't issued any guidance advising the public to avoid restrooms, some caution that the risk is on par with other indoor spaces. If you do use a public restroom, it's important to wear a mask and wash your hands, even if there aren't other people around. Dr. John Ross, hospital medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, told the Harvard Health Blog that other indoor activities like going to bars, attending weddings and religious services, and indoor parties pose a much greater risk than using a public restroom, since the virus is transmitted through aerosol droplets in breath.

It's known that these droplets can stay airborne indoors, per the World Health Organization, and a recent study of two hospitals in Wuhan, China, showed that a temporary, single-toilet room with no ventilation had the highest concentration of aerosols of any other space.

According to Dr. Todd Ellerin, director of infectious diseases and an instructor at Harvard Medical School, it's up to every person to assess their own comfort level. Everyone should wear a mask in public and wash their hands regularly, but it's okay to not want to use a public restroom if it makes you feel more comfortable. "Some people will take their own extra steps with cleaning, because it provides a greater sense of psychological confidence, since there’s still much uncertainty,” he told the Harvard Health Blog.

"When it comes to the bathroom," Dr. Ellerin said, "follow the basic hygiene, get in and out, and you’re probably in a low-risk group."

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