Jillian Michaels gives tips on prioritizing mental and emotional health during quarantine: 'Invest in your self-care'

Jillian Michaels is just like the rest of us as she navigates these unprecedented times. And with quarantine still a way of life, it is no surprise that the fitness expert is prioritizing ways to continue to maintain her overall health.

During Yahoo’s Reset Your Mindset event, Michaels discussed the effects of the burden of uncertainty that weighs heavy on many shoulders.

“Things are scary, crazy unknown,” she said. “We have our kids at home for those of us that have kids, we're overwhelmed in pretty much every conceivable way. And at times like this, it's absolutely normal to say ‘I can't handle anything else. I'm checking out on my self-care and all the other stuff that I deem to be more punishing.’ But one of the most important things you can do is invest in your self-care and prioritize your health right now.”

The former The Biggest Loser fitness trainer went on to encourage people to be their best selves as they go through this difficult time by bringing “meaning and purpose to the moment.”

“Prioritize your physical and mental health in ways that maybe you haven't actually taken the time to do before because it is more important than ever. And there's a reason that saying goes when the going gets tough, the tough get going. You're tough, so let’s get going,” she says.

Getty Images
Getty Images

The Losing It With Jillian star noted that there are a plethora of trainers that are still available to help with daily workouts whether it be through social media or YouTube. She also suggested workout apps like her own, My Fitness, where users can access personalized workouts, meal plans, weight loss planners and more.

She also suggested trying easy workouts at home that require no equipment like squats, lunges, side lunges, pushups, planks, burpees, mountain climbers, butt kicks, jumping jacks, high knees, side planks – and the list goes on.

Michaels also stressed the importance of being mindful of how you’re eating but understands that it can be difficult in trying times.

“I keep a ton of messages and comments on social media and in app forums that people are stress eating and I get it,” she says. “It’s normal to do that when we feel out of control or when we feel stressed or anxious or sad or mad or bored, and I'm sure we're all feeling all of those things. What I want you to do when that happens is pause. Get out of that impulsive state of mind where you're reacting emotionally, right? Pause and say, OK, I'm at the fridge again. Am I actually hungry?”

Michaels also wants to remind people that they should not hold themselves to unrealistic standards, but they can take little steps to prioritize their mental and physical health that will add up.

“Here's what you can change. You can take control of your physical health and the benefits of doing so. Showing up and moving your body, even if it's just for seven to 10 minutes a day, four to five times a week,” she says. “By managing what you're eating and making better food choices more often than you make the bad ones, this will dramatically improve your state of mind.”

For the latest coronavirus news and updates, follow along at https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus. According to experts, people over 60 and those who are immunocompromised continue to be the most at risk. If you have questions, please reference the CDC’s and WHO’s resource guides. 

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