HERstory Made! Ketanji Brown Jackson Sworn in as First Black Female Supreme Court Justice

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Photo by Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

Ketanji Brown Jackson has officially become the 116th Supreme Court justice of the United States

Making history as the first black woman to serve on the highest court of the land, Brown will replace justice Stephen Breyer who officially retired on Thursday, swearing her in.

During the ceremony which took place at noon in Washington, DC, Jackson took a constitutional oath administered by Chief Justice John Roberts and a judicial oath administered by Breyer himself. As Jackson was sworn in, her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson held two stacked bibles: a family one and one donated by Justice John Marshall Harlan known as the Harlan bible.

Jackson was officially elected to the position in April with a 53 to 47 senate vote on her nomination after a grueling confirmation hearing. During her remarks at the White House celebration of her appointment, she expressed her gratitude and pride.

"It has taken 232 years and 115 prior appointments for a Black woman to be selected to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, but we've made it! We've made it — all of us," she said. "I have dedicated my career to public service because I love this country and our Constitution and the rights that make us free."

Photo by Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images

Jackson's confirmation and appointment has become a beacon of hope and marks a sign of progress that the country continues to embrace diversity. Her historical win is a nod to her extensive and impressive career as an attorney, judge and Vice Chair of the United States Sentencing Commission.

A seasoned legal professional, Jackson graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, and later cum laude from Harvard Law School, where she also served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review.

Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Throughout her career, she served as a Supreme Court Clerk for Justice Breyer, as a public defender, and as a Judge on the U.S. District Court and Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.