Everything We Know About the 'Minari' Golden Globe Controversy

Joshua Ocampo
·2 min read
Photo credit: A24
Photo credit: A24

From Men's Health

Out of the Golden Globe-nominated films and television shows this year, perhaps no other project has received more critical acclaim than Minari. Based on director Lee Isaac Chung's own childhood, the film tells the story of a Korean American family adjusting to life in Arkansas during the '80s. The movie was an easy shoe-in during awards season; actor Steven Yuen is perhaps the most buzzed about actor entering Oscar season.

Of course, the Golden Globes themselves have come under fire lately for practices surrounding the voting body (also known as the the Hollywood Foreign Press Association) and their criteria. Minari, too, has been entangled in controversy because of its nomination in the Best Foreign Language category, rather than Best Drama. Here's everything you need to know about the ongoing discussion surrounding Minari's nomination:

Why is Minari not nominated for Best Picture?

In short, pursuant to the guidelines in place by the Hollywood Foreign Press, any film that contains "at least 51% non-English dialogue" is considered a Foreign Language film. Because Minari contains dialogue in Korean that exceeds that threshold, it meets that criteria. Also, any film that qualifies for Best Foreign Language award is exempt from two other major awards: Best Drama and Best Comedy.

Why is Minari's nomination controversial?

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men's Health

For one, the movie is distinctly American—it takes place in the U.S., was filmed in the U.S., features a Korean American family, stars American actors, etc. Many Asian American actors and directors in Hollywood feel Minari is being targeted, given the experience of several movies that have gone on to earn nominations in the Best Picture categories, though they were not predominantly in English. (Many are pointing out Quentin Tarantino's Inglorious Basterds as an example. More than half the movie was spoken in German or French, yet it received a Best Picture nomination back in 2010).

"The film equivalent of being told to go back to your country when that country is actually America," actor Daniel Dae Kim wrote on Twitter.

Here are other reactions to the news:

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

You Might Also Like