Emma Stone Is Unrecognizable in a Pixie Wig on the Cover of 'Vogue'

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Emma Stone VOGUE
Photography by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott for Vogue

Emma Stone’s taken on some versatile roles throughout her distinguished movie career, yet offscreen she’s maintained a signature style. However, gracing the November cover of Vogue, the actress appears transformed.

Shot by fashion photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, the 27-year-old hides her shoulder-length locks with a pixie-cut wig, a style she’s seemingly never tried before. Something else she apparently wore for the first time? A skimpy crop top. Stone displayed more pale skin than usual in a Michael Kors Collection striped sweater.

Emma Stone Vogue
Emma Stone dancing for the camera in a Oscar de la Renta dress, Beladora earrings, and Nicholas Kirkwood shoes. (Photography by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott for Vogue)

Throughout the shoot, Stone tries on multiple different personas, all of which are “pretty chic.” There’s the 1920s flapper wig paired with a polka dot Oscar de la Renta gown; yet another image takes the actress back to Hollywood’s heyday, channeling Marilyn Monroe or Elizabeth Taylor in wayfarer sunglasses and a pencil skirt.

Image: Emma Stone covers Vogue's November Issue.
Emma Stone in a Bottega Veneta cardigan and skirt and Ray-Ban sunglasses. (Photography by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott for Vogue)

With a romantic musical comedy-drama, La La Land, slated to release in December, the Oscar nominee is poised to cement herself in history alongside the women she channels on the pages of the magazine. In the article, Stone discussed everything from her quick and unexpected rise to fame to her thoughts on the male-female wage gap during her interview with the magazine.

Although La La Land hasn’t been released yet, it’s already getting rave reviews. The film, which also stars Ryan Gosling, follows the romance of an actress trying to catch a break in the film industry with an aspiring jazz club owner. It’s already received the seal of approval from one of Hollywood’s finest. “If the audience doesn’t go and embrace something as wonderful as this, then we are all doomed,” Tom Hanks said about the film during a Q&A for his movie Sully.

A quick glance at the trailer for the flick shows that it is a departure from the roles Stone usually snags. In 2014, Stone did star in the musical Cabaret, but she is more known for playing quirky and often humorous characters. It’s clear her career is shifting, as she has taken on more serious, mature, and diverse roles in recent years.

Damien Chazelle, the film’s director, revealed to Vogue why he selected Stone for the role. “Obviously it was a big swing to do an original musical where she’d have to sing and dance and the whole gamut onscreen,” he said. “But Emma just has that presence. She’s a great comedian and also can be tremendously moving. She can play every single register.”

Despite Stone’s immense success, she remains humble and grounded. The actress maintains that just as the the industry fluctuates, so does actors’ relevance. “You always feel a little bit like that,” she said. “That you could again be an outsider, that something could make people never want to hire you again.”

Image: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott / Vogue
Image: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott / Vogue

La La Land is one of Stone’s many projects in the works. She’s also starring in the upcoming Battle of the Sexes, with Steve Carell, about a revolutionary tennis match that shed light on gender equality.

Taking part in Battle of the Sexes was important to Stone, who has been vocal about eradicating the wage gap between men and women in Hollywood. “We should all be treated fairly and paid fairly,” she said. “I’ve been lucky enough to have equal pay to my male co-stars. Not ‘lucky.’ I’ve had pay equal to my male co-stars in the past few films. But our industry ebbs and flows in a way that’s like, ‘How much are you bringing into the box office?’ ‘How much are you the draw or is the other person the draw?’ I felt uncomfortable talking to my agent or lawyer about it because I was like, ‘Do people want to see me as much as they want to see Steve Carell?’ It’s a weird conversation to have because it’s trying to see oneself from the outside.”

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